MSc Systems Engineering degree

Qualifications available: MSc

Entry requirements
2:1 +
Full-time
1 year
Part-time
2-6 years (typically 3 years)
Start date
September 2020
UK / EU fee
£10,950
International fee
£23,500
Location
Loughborough
Application status
Open

The fee stated is for a full-time student undertaking a master’s programme of 180 credits. Part-time students should divide the published fee by 180 credits and then multiply by the number of credits they are taking to calculate their tuition fees.

Overview

Our MSc Systems Engineering has been designed in collaboration with industry to meet the challenge of interdependence between sophisticated engineered systems of all kinds.

Advanced modelling, simulation and interactive visualisation tools and techniques will enable you to gain greater understanding of the performance, behaviour and emergent properties of advanced technology and complex systems. You will have access to advanced visualisation techniques to enhance models and simulations of real-world systems, including cockpit simulators to study pilot behaviour toward stress and the impact this has upon their mental agility.

The Systems Engineering master's emphasises model-based systems engineering, and is thus positioned at the cutting edge of academic and practitioner practice. To support this approach, you will gain an understanding and be encouraged to use appropriate systems-based computer tools across all modules. These range from the use of general tools and program environments such as those typified by spreadsheets, MATLAB, and LabView; to more specific software such as System Architect, SysML toolsets, and Triz (the latter is used in product innovation). The software tools are pre-loaded onto machines in specific laboratories which are accessible outside teaching hours.

World-class visualisation facilities and an interaction management wall (comprising six large, integrated monitors) are available should students become involved in research in those areas as part of their individual projects. These facilities are open during normal working hours only (for health and safety reasons).

Our academic team is internationally renowned for their research and industry influence, and bring a wealth of knowledge and experience to each module. Throughout the programme, you will also receive insights from guest lecturers and industry practitioners that provide a real-world perspective to your learning.

The programme is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control, the IET and the Royal Aeronautical Society. There are also professional links to INCOSE-UK and the Object Management Group standards body.

Who should study this programme?

Our MSc Systems Engineering is aimed at engineers who have specialised in a traditional discipline but are now expected to understand, operate in, develop and integrate entire systems that are not only increasingly complex but rapidly changing.

Why you should choose us

Why you should study this degree

What makes this programme different?

  • world-class visualisation facilities
  • accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control, the IET, and the Royal Aeronautical Society.

What you'll study

Key study areas include systems thinking, systems architecture, systems design, verification and validation, and an individual project. You'll have the option to undertake modules in a range of areas, ranging from Holistic Engineering to Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Engineering.

Modules

MSc Systems Engineering covers a wide range of topics; to give you a taster we have expanded on some of the core modules affiliated with this programme and the specific assessment methods associated with each module.

You will take a total of 105 compulsory credits across semesters 1 and 2 and a further 75 credits of optional modules as follows:

  • 15 or 30 credits from group A
  • 30 to 60 credits from group B
  • no more than 15 credits from group C in place of a module in group B.

The following information is intended as an example only and is based on module information for the 2019/20 year of entry. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes. Updated Programme and Module Specifications are made available ahead of each academic year. Please see Terms and Conditions of Study for more information.

Applied Systems Thinking

The aims of this module are to provide a rigorous approach for all engineering students to acquire the principles, concepts and outline applications of systems-based studies.

This module enables students to consider the development and operation of systems from an holistic perspective within the ethical, regulatory, economic, commercial, and environmental context in which they must be deployed. It includes the following: introduction to systems concepts and theory; history and principles of the systems approach; diagrammatic models (classification and type); interpretive structural modelling; hard systems methodology; soft systems methodology; Systems dynamics modelling; cybernetics and information feedback, open loop and closed loop decision models.

Learning outcomes

On completion of the module should be able to do the following:

  • describe the nature of systems-based techniques, methods and methodologies
  • apply a systems approach to engineering
  • use systems methods for problem structuring and problem solving
  • analyse systems and their dynamic behaviours
  • construct diagrammatic models for a variety of system types
  • demonstrate the use of systems concepts and terminology
  • use appropriate tools to model non-linear systems and visualise their results
  • use of presentation software to communicate system modelling outputs
  • communicate effectively using appropriate tools
  • find resources via information search strategies and evaluate their usefulness
  • use a referencing system in an appropriate manner
  • demonstrate an awareness of ethical, legal, economic and sustainability considerations in systems development and operation

Assessment

  • Exam (40%)
  • Coursework (60%)

This module enables students to consider the development and operation of systems from an holistic perspective within the ethical, regulatory, economic, commercial, and environmental context in which they must be deployed. It includes the following: introduction to systems concepts and theory; history and principles of the systems approach; diagrammatic models (classification and type); interpretive structural modelling; hard systems methodology; soft systems methodology; Systems dynamics modelling; cybernetics and information feedback, open loop and closed loop decision models.

Systems Architecture

The aims of this module are to give students: practical knowledge of systems from a model based and architectural viewpoint; an understanding of system and enterprise architecture frameworks; knowledge of and practice with software and systems modelling languages, methods, and commercially available tools; and an introduction to model driven architecture and analysis. Students will learn a system definition and architecture design process aligned to ISO/IEC 15288 and how to model the architecture of a system and use it to assess system functionality and behaviour.

This module offers a logical and scientific basis for systems architecture, using models and transformations between models to include: relation between systems architecting and systems engineering, especially system design; using the Unified and Systems Modeling Languages (UML) for system development; metamodels, modelling system requirements, structure, and behaviour; structured analysis and design; model driven architecture and analysis; system of system architecture, enterprise architecture and frameworks; research and advanced methods in the international community.

Learning outomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate the use of methods for system architecture and how architecture models can be used for analysis and assessment. Students will also be familiar with research and advanced methods in the international community and the challenges of model based approaches
  • Demonstrate an understanding of systems from a model based and architectural viewpoint
  • Model system architecture and requirements, and system analysis and assessment, through application within the case studies
  • Apply a standard modelling language to a range of systems problems in an end to end system architecture process

Assessment

  • Laboratory Group case study outcomes (40%)
  • Individual Technical Report (60%)

Group Systems Project

This module aims to develop students' expertise in the planning and execution of an extensive systems project working as a member of a team. Its purpose is to consolidate knowledge and skills developed in the MSc Systems Engineering. The module will explore the application of Systems Engineering tools and techniques in an integrated fashion within a project team.

Content will include: stakeholder needs and requirements definition, requirements analysis, architecture design, design definition, system analysis, implementation, integration, verification, validation, project planning, project assessment and control, decision management, risk management, configuration management, information management, measurement, human resources management.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of how a range of systems techniques and tools should be integrated to address all aspects of a systems development project, including necessary models and documentation
  • Exercise initiative and personal responsibility within a team
  • Create rational decision making processes for a complex engineering project
  • Demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the rigorous processes needed for maintaining documentation and communications in a complex group project
  • Create an appropriate Systems Engineering Management Plan for a project
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply a range of systems engineering tools from across the systems development life cycle
  • Apply suitable project management techniques for the size and nature of a project
  • Interact appropriately and effectively with project customers
  • Generate suitable concepts to meet customer requirements using appropriate idea generation techniques
  • Communicate project progress and results through written, oral and IT methods
  • Work effectively within a project team

Assessment

  • Group Presentation (10%)
  • Systems Engineering Management Plan (10%)
  • Delivered Systems (20%)
  • Individual Report (60%)

Individual Project

The aim of this module is to develop students' skills and to provide experience in the planning and execution of an extensive research and/or development project in a specialised area of engineering or science appropriate to the student's programme of study and that demonstrates significant complexity.

The project may take any of several forms: it may be hardware or software based, largely theoretical or strictly practical. It may be derived from an industrial need formulated by the student in collaboration with the Programme Director. Students will keep a learning journal in which their learning and development is recorded and reflected upon.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of relevant engineering and scientific principles for the specialism
  • Critically evaluate theoretical concepts and technical methods for effective application within the technical project
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of engineering and technical management processes for application in the project
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply original thought to the development of practical solutions for systems, products, components, or processes relevant to the specialism
  • Demonstrate the ability to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new technological solutions
  • Apply suitable models to the solution of engineering problems and articulate their limitations within the project context
  • Collect and analyse research data and use appropriate engineering tools to tackle unfamiliar problems
  • Manage time, resources and risks to achieve negotiated objectives
  • Interact effectively with project supervision, customers and other stakeholders to achieve acceptable outcomes
  • Report and present project results and outcomes appropriately for a technical audience
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify personal development needs and plan self-learning.

Assessment

  • Learning Journal (5%)
  • Interim Project Report (10%)
  • Viva voce (15%)
  • Dissertation (70%)

Group A

Sensors and Actuators for Control

The aims of this module are for the students to understand the options available and the issues related to selection of sensors and actuators for control systems.

The module will include the following topics: sensors (sensed quantities, sensor types, uses of sensors, dynamics of sensors, smart sensors, sensor fault detection and redundancy); actuation (basic principles; use in hydraulic systems, pneumatic systems, electrical systems, advanced materials, choice of actuation system, open and closed loop actuation, actuator fault tolerance and redundancy); and system design of sensor/actuator/control systems; and awareness of the application of Matlab/Simulink for analysing control systems and their associated sensors and actuators.

Learning outcomes

On completion of the module the students should be able to:

  • Explain the key issues related to selection of actuators and sensors as part of a control system
  • Describe the range of sensor and actuator types and technologies
  • Appraise a range of sensor and actuator types and technologies
  • Describe the dynamic properties of commonly used sensors and actuators
  • Explain how faults/failures can affect sensors and actuators and how these can be mitigated
  • Select a sensor for a given application
  • Select and undertake fundamental sizing of an actuator for a given application
  • Develop dynamic models of commonly used sensors and actuators
  • Propose a closed-loop control solution with sensors and actuators included in the analysis
  • Propose redundancy schemes for fault tolerance in sensor and actuator applications
  • Contribute to a group presentationW
  • Write a report in a simple, clear, accurate manner, which incorporates all relevant information and is submitted on the specified deadline
  • Develop information search and retrieval skills from all available sources including library, manufacturers, data-bases and internet.

Assessment

  • Group Exercise with Presentation (40%)
  • Report (60%)

On completion of the module the students should be able to: 
(1) Knowledge and Understanding 
Explain the key issues related to selection of actuators and sensors as part of a control system. 
Describe the range of sensor and actuator types and technologies. 
(2) Skills and Attributes 
(i) Intellectual 
Appraise a range of sensor and actuator types and technologies. 
Describe the dynamic properties of commonly used sensors and actuators. 
Explain how faults/failures can affect sensors and actuators and how these can be mitigated. 
(ii) Practical 
Select a sensor for a given application. 
Select and undertake fundamental sizing of an actuator for a given application. 
Develop dynamic models of commonly used sensors and actuators. 
Propose a closed-loop control solution with sensors and actuators included in the analysis. 
Propose redundancy schemes for fault tolerance in sensor and actuator applications. 
(iii) Transferable 
a) contribute to a group presentation. 
b) write a report in a simple, clear, accurate manner, which incorporates all relevant information and is submitted on the specified deadline. 
Develop information search and retrieval skills from all available sources including library, manufacturers, data-bases and internet.

Understanding Complexity

The aims of this module are to introduce students to the problems of complexity (optimisation, reliability, simulation) as the size of a system grows, and to introduce some of the methods used in addressing such problems.

This module will cover the following topics: Aspects of Game Theory; Taylor's theorem and its many uses. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations, and their numerical solution; Algorithmic complexity and heuristics; System Optimization; Evolutionary Computing and Genetic Algorithms; Uses of simple Neural Networks; Probability Theory; Reliability Theory; and Non-linear dynamics and Chaos.

 

Learning outcomes

One completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Explain some of the difficulties caused as the size and complexity of a system grows
  • Describe some of the methods with which such problems may be tackled
  • Simulate a range of complex systems numerically using a range of techniques
  • Demonstrate effective use of tools such as MATLAB to undertake the analyse of some complex systems
  • Design and produce code to simulate a range of physical problems
  • Demonstrate effective use of a number of techniques for modelling complexity, such as Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms and modelling tools such as MATLAB and/or Fault Tree.

Assessment

  • Coursework (50%)
  • Exam (50%)

 

Group B

Systems Design

The aims of this module are to give students: practical knowledge of design and requirements engineering from a systems and model based viewpoint; an understanding of the relation between system design, system architecture, and verification and validation (V&V); an introduction to and practice with software and systems modelling languages, methods, and commercially available tools; and an introduction to system modelling and analysis in support of design. Students will learn a system design process aligned to ISO/IEC 15288 and to how model a system for system design and analysis.

This module offers a model based engineering approach to system design to include: system design process and engineering for the life cycle; structured analysis and design; relation between system design, architecture, and V&V; requirements engineering; system concept definition and architecture specification; system design specification; system integration; introduction to the Systems Modeling Languages (SysML) for systems; introduction to models for system specification; a model based approach to Quality Function Deployment and design trades; behavioural modelling and analysis; non-functional analysis; research and advanced methods in the international community.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate the use of methods for requirements engineering and system design, analysis and assessment. The student will also be familiar with research and advanced methods in the international community and the challenges of model based approaches
  • Demonstrate an understanding of system design from a model based and systems viewpoint and its relation to system architecture and V&V
  • Identify stakeholders and capture requirements; to model and analyse systems for design trades; and use system models to specify system implementation, through application within the case studies
  • Apply a standard modelling language to a range of systems problems in an end to end design process.

Assessment

  • Laboratory Case Study (40%)
  • Technical Report (60%)

Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Engineering

Website Design 20% Coursework Yes, can be reassessed in SAP
Presentation 30% Coursework Yes, can be reassessed in SAP
Feasibility Report 50%The aim of this module is for students to understand the relationship between creative management, innovation and enterprise in a learning environment that provides the interactive methods and tools for individual and group success.

The module will include: an overview of design, innovation and entrepreneurship process in engineering and manufacturing industry; value proposition and Business model innovation; the relationship between innovation/entrepreneurship and market analysis, competitor studies, resource management, operations coordination and supply chain management; operationalising innovative ideas in practice (developing business plans and writing feasibility studies), funding and sourcing new ideas.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Describe the creative management process and the different steps essential to successfully initiate and implement a new business idea
  • Describe relationships between innovation/entrepreneurship and business environment, market, industry and competitor analysis as well as resource and operations management
  • Establish a framework to identify business opportunities from engineering interventions
  • Critically analyse all business aspects of an innovative product or a new business idea
  • Demonstrate a business/product idea through writing a business plan and a feasibility study supported by appropriate fund raising activities
  • Relate and comprehend the principles covered in the module to their own experience of designing new products or innovative projects in practice
  • Professionally present a new business/product idea, using a presentation, a business model, creative website and professional reports
  • Manage group activities and group work dynamics.

Assessment

  • Website Design (20%)
  • Presentation (30%)
  • Feasibility Report (50%)

 

Website Design 20%   Coursework     Yes, can be reassessed in SAP
Presentation 30%   Coursework     Yes, can be reassessed in SAP
Feasibility Report 50%

Validation and Verification

The aims of this module are to give students: practical knowledge of verification and validation (V&V) for testing and acceptance of systems from a systems and model based viewpoint; understanding of the relation between design and V&V with the objective of concurrent V&V and design of robust systems; an introduction to hardware and software in the loop testing; and an introduction to and practice with software and systems modelling languages and methods using commercially available tools. Students will learn V&V procedures and tests aligned to ISO/IEC 15288 and IEEE 1516 from a systems and model based viewpoint and how to use V&V to influence system design and analysis.

In this module systems modelling and engineering analytics come together in this module to include: V&V procedures and tests; noise in test measurements; reliability and other non-functional testing and evaluation; hardware and software in the loop testing; V&V design and analysis; robustness metrics, design of experiments; approaches to concurrent system design and V&V; introduction to the Systems Modeling Languages (SysML) for systems; using models for system requirements, structure, and behaviour traceability; realisation and capability assessment; research and advanced methods in the international community.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate the use of methods for system V&V procedures and tests and how they can be used for assessment and analysis. The student will also be familiar with research and advanced methods in the international community
  • Demonstrate an understanding of V&V from a model based and systems viewpoint, and its relation to system design
  • Model system V&V and requirements traceability; and use V&V to reduce system design risk and improve robustness, through application within the case studies
  • Apply a standard modelling language to a range of systems problems in an end to end V&V process.

Assessment

  • Group Case Study (40%)
  • Individual Technical Report (60%)

Holistic Engineering

The aim of this module is for students to understand the range of challenges thrown up by complex engineering projects and the techniques that can be applied to overcome them. Whilst the nature of the role of engineering has evolved markedly over recent decades, it is the ability to take that role's holistic perspective that the module aims to develop in the student. This perspective can be associated with the role of Chief Engineer and the course gives a 21st century view of what the role of Chief Engineer entails.

A range of case studies from the military aircraft domain provides the focus of the module, but the content, the systems approaches taken and the learning achieved are sufficiently transferable to other engineering domains and industrial sectors for any student to benefit from taking this module. The case studies from real programmes will be used to illuminate a range of critical topics including requirements definition, problem analysis, system architecture, the product lifecycle, engineering organisation design etc, which will then be subject to rigorous exploration in the theory and practical sessions.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Describe their broad appreciation & contextual knowledge of the industrial projects, enterprises, environments and stakeholders associated with complex engineered products & services, by being able to:

-explain and illustrate how engineering highly integrated systems can both create added value and introduce unwanted risk throughout the system lifecycle

- identify and describe key engineering roles, including that of Chief Engineer, and what they contribute in complex, multi-disciplinary engineering enterprises
- evaluate and critically appraise the strengths and weaknesses of commercially available systems engineering methods, tools and techniques using the essential systems principles
- demonstrate the structure and judge the value of the Engineering Management Plan in the context of the systems lifecycle

  • Interpret and apply the essential principles of a systems approach to formulate, construct and evaluate systems models of real world products and processes, by being able to:

- describe and inter-relate real world & modelling world complex entities
- describe and apply integrated product and process modelling, principles of system hierarchy using black box/white box modelling, principles of attribute emergence, absorption and retention, and modelling using intrinsic and extrinsic processes
- describe and apply the Universal System Equation
- critically evaluate the limitations of models

  • Critically appraise a wide range of methods and tools for engineering analysis and design.

Assessment

  • 100% coursework

Modelling, Simulation and Visualisation for Engineering

This module will cover a number of topics, notably: modelling and simulation techniques; simulation; visulization; verification and validation of models and simulations. Students will be required to explore a number of modelling and simulation tools (which could include Anylogic, Excel, Simulink or others), and a number of hands on experiences will be provided through demonstrations in the Advanced VR Research Centre to provide context behind the theory.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Generate suitable concepts for modelling, simulation and visualization as a key part of Virtual Engineering and how to apply this within engineering and manufacturing disciplines
  • Communicate and develop strategies that ensure results from modelling and simulation can be validated
  • Create a modelling and simulation framework in order to identify required inputs and outputs
  • Undertake a critical appraisal of the implications of making assumptions and approximations and to become aware of the limitations caused by modelling and simulation artefacts through the use of case studies and practical work
  • Establish the requirements and the approach for modelling and simulation in order to investigate engineering challenges
  • Critically appraise and interpret the results of simulations using a range of visualization techniques
  • Generate appropriate rationale behind the need to seek evidence to support any modelling/simulation activity rather than relying on calculated/computed results.

Assessment

  • 100% coursework

 

Engineering and Managing Capability

The aims of this module are:

  • to give students an understanding of capability provision and the Systems of Systems concepts that underpin it
  • to give students an understanding of the challenges of capability management and the business transformation they imply
  • through case studies and group project work, to give students insight into the Systems of Systems Engineering through which suppliers and users provide and support capability.

This module explores the complicated nature of sophisticated technology within the social, political, and commercial environment to consider the practical aspects of managing large-scale, complex systems.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • Explain the concept of Capability Engineering and demonstrate an understanding of the commercial imperatives for its provision. They will be able to articulate an awareness of the business, management and engineering challenges involved
  • Demonstrate an understanding of through life systems and identify appropriate tools and techniques to manage capability provision
  • Describe the commercial context of capability-based acquisition
  • Apply techniques and methods covered in the module to contribute to the development and management of capability reflecting the 'Systems of Systems' challenges of the 21st Century
  • Demonstrate how the concepts of Through Life Systems & costs management, Interoperability, Logistics, Obsolescence Management, systems architecting, modelling and simulation, networks, services and engineering systems for Systems of Systems may be combined to deliver capabilities
  • Describe how the concepts introduced in the module may be applied in a variety of domains.

Assessment

  • Group Project Case Study (50%)
  • Individual Essay (50%)

Group C

Engineering for Sustainable Development

The aims of this module are to provide students with an understanding of the principles and practices of sustainable devlopment and to provide them with an understanding of how engineers can help manufacturing buisnesses develop into more sustainable enterprises.

Content taught in this module will cover:

  • Principles of sustainability
  • Climate change and global development
  • Sustainable design
  • Materials resource efficiency
  • Energy use and management
  • Renewable energy
  • Product service systems
  • Waste minimization
  • Environmental legislation
  • Product recovery
  • Environmental management systems
  • Sustainable consumption

A range of case studies will be used to demonstrate sustainable manufacturing practices and these will be drawn from topics that include: the automotive industry; food manufacturing; waste management; and electrical and electronic products.

Assessment

Assessment for this module comprises of one 2 hour written examination worth 70% and an individual coursework comprising a research based essay worth 30%.

Manufacturing Processes Automation

The aim of the module is for students to understand the concepts and state-of-the-art on a range of manufacturing techniques available to the current and future manufacturing engineer.

This module is split into three complimentary topics which are delivered throughout the weeks. The topics are:

  • Automation: Industrial automation systems, industrial robots, sensing technologies, collaborative systems, the business of automation.
  • Computer numerical control: Major components of a CNC system, co-ordinate systems and G-code.
  • Laser processing: Principles of lasers and modern laser devices, laser processing and safety, laser drilling, laser cutting, laser welding.

Assessment

This module is assessed by an exam worth 80% and two pieces of coursework out of three, each worth 10%. The options for coursework are: A descriptive piece of writing based on a modern technology/ technique used in automation, a written summary report based on a computer numerical control laboratory and a written research proposal style article based on a new laser processing technique.

Additive Manufacturing

The module will introduce and develop the concepts of Additive Manufacturing (AM) and demonstrate the different AM techniques available at Loughborough. This course will teach the various processes in relation to the seven ASTM F42 standards in order to easily categorize the different processes and overcome issues with the technology classifications. Emphasis will be placed on the strengths and weaknesses of the various technologies and applications and case studies from the AM industry will be highlighted. AM for use in production development, rapid tooling and Reverse Engineering with case examples from a range of industrial sectors will also be covered throughout the duration of the course.

Additionally, the module will encompass various interactive lectures, hands-on tutorials using 3D printing equipment and demonstrations using the various Additive Manufacturing equipment available at Loughborough University.

Computer Aided Engineering

The aim of this module is to enable students to evaluate, choose and implement CAE systems.

Teaching content will include:

  • Management of CAE Systems
  • Application of 2D draughting
  • 3D modelling
  • Finite Element Analysis
  • NC Programming and Machining
  • Mechanism Analysis
  • Optimisation

Assessment

The module is assessed by 100% coursework made up of a practical assessment in pairs (with individual assessment) (40%) and a written dissertation relating to systems management and analysis techniques in pairs (30%), and modelling techniques dissertation (30%) completed in pairs.

Engineering Design Methods

To provide students with a working understanding of some of the main methods which may be employed in the design of products and systems.

This module will cover:

  • An overview of design methods
  • Principles of marketing
  • Quality Function Deployment (QFD)
  • Product design specifications (PDS)
  • Creative techniques
  • Design evaluation
  • Graphical techniques
  • Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA)
  • Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA).

Assessment

This module is 100% courseowrk based assessment comprised of 4 exercises: 1 individually assessed coursework and 3 group courseworks completed by griups of 2 or 3 students. WebPA will be used with group assessments to provide individual marks.

 

Digital Signal Processing

The aims of this module are to develop critical understanding of the fundamentals of digital signal processing, as applied to numerous and commonplace digital systems, with the use of computer simulation based tools.

Content taught on this module will cover topics such as:

  • Characterization and classification of digital signals
  • Digital processing of continuous-time signals: sampling, aliasing, quantization and reconstruction
  • The z-transform, regions of convergence, inverse and properties
  • Linear time invariant (LTI) discrete-time systems, input/output convolution, impulse response sequence and transfer function based upon the discrete-time Fourier transform (DTFT), poles and zeros, magnitude and phase characteristics
  • Digital filter structures, recursive and non-recursive
  • Methods for digital filter design
  • Spectral analysis with the DFT and FFT
  • Digital mulitrate signal processing, decimation and interpolation, polyphase decomposition, applications
  • Real-time DSP on TI 6713

Assessment

The assessment for this module will be both a written examination worth 70% and coursework assignments (30%). The coursework will be individual and composed of two assignments; one on general DSP and a second on digital filter design. The assignment requires familiarity with scientific programming language, preferably Matlab. For the assignments, assessment will be based on reports summarising results and underlying concepts.

 

Communication Networks

This module aims to develop your understanding of the principles of networked digital communications.

The content taught on this module will include:

  • Introduction to computer networks
  • The network structure
  • The physical layer
  • The queuing theory
  • The data link layer
  • The Wireless LAN
  • The Network Layer
  • The Transport Layer
  • The efficiency of protocols.

Assessment

The assessment for this module will be a written examination (70%) and one coursework assignment (30%). The assignment will be a laboratory-based mini-project whereby the students will monitor the utilisation of one of the University's networks. Each student will then submit an individual report and perform basic analysis of the results.

Lean and Agile Manufacture

The aim of the module is for students to gain an understanding of lean and agile concepts in the manufacturing business, including its distribution chains.

Content taught on this module will be split into two parts:

  • Part 1 - Lean Manufacture. The essential characteristics of lean manufacture, including the lean toolbox. The underpinning cultural values at Toyota to enable lean manufacture. Lean planning and scheduling. Lean cell design and motivational issues in lean systems.
  • Part 2 - Agile and Virtual Systems. Definition of agility. Examples of virtual and agile systems. Mixing lean and agile systems to achieve responsiveness. Core competence issues and building the knowledge network. Postponement strategies, organisation of responsive and lean distribution chains, demand smoothing, aligned distribution chains, global distribution. The Lean Game.

Assessment

This will be a one 2-hour, end of semester examination (80%) and one, short group coursework presentation (20%) conducted during the teaching week. Groups will comprise 2-4 students and the group mark will equate to the individual mark where each student will contribute equally to the workload and presentation.

 

Telecommunications Network Security

The module aims to give students a broad view of security issues, threats and challenges as well as countermeasures developed in networked systems, with a focus on telecommunications networks.

Module content covers:

  • Introduction to telecommunications network security: review of different types of threats and attacks, and security services and mechanisms in telecommunications systems.
  • Classical cryptography and authentication: the DES and RSA algorithms, message authentication, secure Hash algorithms, digital signatures, key distribution and management.
  • Intrusion detection: types of network attacks and network anomalies, packet inspection, honeypot, anomaly detection based on signal processing and machine learning techniques.
  • Security protocols: IP SEC, SSL/TLS, VPN.
  • Physical layer security: information-theoretical security, physical-layer key generation.

Assessment

For this module assessment comprises of one two hour written examination (70%). One coursework report (30%). The report is based on a lab project on implementing, analysing and mitigating the possible security attacks. Each student will then analyse the results and submit an individual report.

How you'll be assessed

You will be assessed via a variety of different methods, including coursework, written reports and project presentations. For full details, please see the module descriptions above.

How you'll study

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Field trips
  • Independent study
  • Group work
  • Supervision
  • Workshops
  • Practical sessions

Your personal and professional development

The School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering is committed to helping you develop the skills and attributes you need to progress successfully in your chosen career.

Future career prospects

Graduates of our Systems Engineering master's will gain capabilities that are in global demand across a range of sectors and which can be applied to the challenges and issues posed by any complex system design and operation. Promotion within their company for sponsored students is common since the programme enables them to match higher job expectations and demands. Employed students often bring a work-relevant topic to their individual project giving the opportunity to display newly acquired skills.

Your personal development

The programme's curriculum stimulates thinking and extends the capabilities of technical managers and engineers to handle complexity and remain effective in the workplace by providing:

  • an integrated systems engineering view of inter-related technologies, processes, tools, techniques and their effective use
  • essential systems skills such as model-based systems architecture and design, against a background of the need for traceability in managing complex projects
  • knowledge and technical expertise in a range of systems technologies
  • experience of the importance to ultimate success of effective, integrated, multi-skilled project teams working in extended enterprises beyond the confines of any particular organisation
  • increased depth of technical and management knowledge through elective modules
  • the ability to transfer systems skills and knowledge into the workplace through an individual project.

Entry requirements

Our entry requirements are listed using standard UK undergraduate degree classifications i.e. first-class honours, upper second-class honours and lower second-class honours. To learn the equivalent for your country, please choose it from the dropdown below.

Entry requirements for United Kingdom

A 2:1 honours degree (or equivalent international qualification) in a relevant science, technology, engineering or maths discipline.

Applicants with qualifications slightly below this level, alternative qualifications and/or professional experience will also be considered.

Afghanistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Masters 95% 85% 70%

Albania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplomë e Nivelit të Pare (First Level (University) Diploma (from 2010) 9.5 8.5 8

Algeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence (4 year) / Diplome d'Inginieur d'Etat / Diplôme d'Etudes Supérieures 16 14 12

Argentina

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Argentina 8.5 7.5 6.0

Armenia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavri Kochum 90% 80% 70%
Magistrosi Kochum 3.9 3.5 3.0

Australia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Honours degree (AQF level 8) First Class, 80% Upper Second, 70%, H2A Lower Second, 60%, 2B
Ordinary degree - AQF Level 7 pass (mark 46 or 50) High Distinction (80% or 85%) Distinction (75% or 80%) Distinction (70% or 75%)

Austria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree/ Diplomstudium / Magister degree A (or 1.5) mit Auszeichnungbestanden 60% or B or 3.0 (or 2) 50% or C or 2.7 (or 3)

Azerbaijan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavr Diplomu 4.5 4 3.5
Diplomu (Specialist Diploma) 90% 80% 70%

Bahamas

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Bahrain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Bangladesh

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
BUET or 'Good Private' University - 4 year degree BUET - 1st (70%) / 3.5 BUET - 2nd (60%) / 3.0 BUET - 2nd (55%) / 2.75
Other universities - Masters (1-2 years) following a 3 or 4 year degree 80% / 4.0 65% / 3.25 50% / 2.5

Barbados

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Barbados - Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Belarus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Specialist Diploma (5Yr) 9 7 5

Belgium

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor degree Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude 60%/12
Licenciaat 80% 70% 60%
Licencie 17 14 12

Belize

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Benin

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Maitrise 18 15 or Bien 12 or Assez Bien

Bermuda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Bolivia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
A Licenciado, 4 years Private (public/private) 85/78 75/66 67/55

Bosnia and Herzegovina

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma Visokog Obrazovanja / Diplomirani 10 9 8

Botswana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's degree A or 80% B or 70% C or 60%

Brazil

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brazil - 4 yr Bacharel or Licenciado/Licenciatura or Título Profissional 8.5 (A) 7.5 6.0

Brunei

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brunei First Upper Second (60%/B/3.1) Lower Second (50%/C/2.7)

Bulgaria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 yr Diploma za Zavarsheno Visshe Obrazovanie (Diploma of Completed Higher Education) 6 5 4

Cambodia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 years 90% or 9 or 4.0 80% or 8 or 3.5 70% or 7 or 3.0

Cameroon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor degree or Diplome d'Etudes Superiures de Commerce 1st or 15 2:1 or 14 2:2 or 12.5
Diplome d'Ingenieur or Diplôme d'Ingénieur de Conception or a Maitrise or a 4 year Licence 20 or GPA 3.7 20 or Bien (GPA 3.4) 20 or Assez Bien (GPA 3.1)

Canada

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0/percentage scale 3.7/85% 3.3/75% 2.7/68%
Out of 9 8 6 5
Out of 12 10 8 6

Chile

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Grado de Licenciado / Título (Profesional) de [subject area] (4 years) 6 5.5 5

China

Students are required to have a bachelor degree (4 years) for entry to a postgraduate programme. The University uses the Shanghai Academic Ranking of World Universities to identify the required final mark, as outlined on the table below:

First class (70%) Mid 2:1 (65%) 2:1 (60%) Mid 2:2 (55%) 2:2 (50%)
Shanghai Rank Top 250 85% 81% 80% 78% 77%
Shanghai Rank 251-500 89% 84% 83% 81% 80%
Shanghai Rank 501+ 92% 87% 86% 85% 82%

Affiliated colleges

The University will consider students from Affiliated Colleges in the following way:

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities in the top 250 Shanghai rankings will considered if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 80%-84%.

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities which are 251-500 in the Shanghai rankings will considered if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 82%-87%.

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities which are above 500 in the Shanghai rankings will considered as follows:

  • School of Business and Economics: not considered
  • All other programmes if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 82%-87%.

Universities given special consideration

Applicants from a small number of Chinese universities that specialise in business, management, finance or creative arts will be given special consideration by the University. The full list of these universities and the Shanghai band under which they will be considered can be found in the PDF below.

Download the list of Chinese universities given special consideration here

Students who do not meet the above requirements may occasionally be considered if they have a relevant degree, can show good grades in relevant subjects, and/or have substantial relevant work experience.

Colombia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 4.5 3.75 3.2

Costa Rica

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado 9 8 or 80 7 or 75

Croatia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Baccalaureus / Prvostupnik 4.5 3.8 3.0

Cuba

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4-year Titulo de Licenciado / Licenciatura 5 4 3

Cyprus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Cyprus 8.5 7.0 6.5

Czech Republic

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalár (after 2001) 6 yr integrated Magistr 1 1.5 2

Denmark

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 year Candidatus/Candidata Magisterii or Bachelor degree (7 point scale) 12 10 7

Dominican Republic

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year Licenciado 3.8 Magna Cum Laude 3.5 Cum Laude 3.2
Título de [subject area] - 85% 82%

Ecuador

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Título de Licenciado 8.5 8 7
Título de [subject area] 85% 80% 70%

Egypt

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Egypt 3.5 3.2 2.8
Universities only BA 90%, BSc 85% BA 80%, BSc 75% BA 65%, BSc 65%

El Salvador

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 year Licenciado 8.5 7.5 6.5
Título de Ingeniero 85% 75% 65%
Arquitecto - Muy Bueno Bueno

Estonia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalaureusekraad or Magister or Magistrikraad 5 or A 4 or B 3 or C

Ethiopia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's A/GPA 4.0 A/GPA 3.5 B/GPA 2.8

Finland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kandidaattii/Kandidat (out of 3) 3 2 1
Maisteri/Magister (out of 5) 4.5 3 2.5

France

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence (3 years)/ Maitrise/ Diplôme d'Ingénieur 14 12 11

Georgia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4-year degree (% = new system) 5 (95%) 4.5 (85%) 4 (75%)

Germany

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
German Bachelor/ Diplom, Magister Artium / Zeugnis über den Zweiten Abschnitt der Ärztlichen Prüfung 1.5 2.5 3.0

Ghana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Ghana First Upper second/60% Lower second/50%

Greece

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
AEI 8.5 7.0 6
TEI 8.5 7 6.5

Grenada

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of West Indies - classification 1st 2:1 2:2
Degree from University of West Indies - grade / percentage A B / 75% C / 55%
Degree from University of West Indies - GPA 3.6 3.0 2.0

Guatemala

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Liceniado / Titulo de (subject area) - 4years 90% (public university) / 95% (private university) 80% (public university) / 85% (private university) 60% (public university) / 70% (private university)

Guyana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's GPA 4 GPA 3.5 3.0

Honduras

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Título de Licenciado / Grado Académico de Licenciatura (4 year degree) - GPA out of 5 GPA 5 or 90% GPA 4 or 80% GPA 3.5 or 70%

Hong Kong

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.5

Hungary

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Alapfokozt or Egyetemi Oklevel / Bachelor 5 4 3

Iceland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Baccalaurreatus degree or Kandidatsprof/Candidatus Mag 8.5 7.5 6.5

India

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Institutions listed on the Indian Ranking of Higher Educational Institutions Framework 65% (First) 60% (First) 55% (Upper second)
All other Indian institutions 70% (First with distinction) 65% (First) 60% (First)

Indonesia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sarjana I (S1) from A (or B) credited Universities 3.7 (4.0) 3.3 (3.7) 3 (3.3)

Iran

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iran 17 15 13

Iraq

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iraq 80% 75% 70%

Ireland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Republic of Ireland First (70%) Upper second (60%) Lower second (50%)

Israel

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
3 yr Bachelor Degree 90% 80% 70%

Italy

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma di Laurea 109/110 104/110 (or 27) 100/110 (or 26)

Ivory Coast

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplome d'Etude Approfondies, Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures 16 14 (Bien) 12 (Assez Bien)

Jamaica

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
For degrees studied at The University of West Indies or degrees accredited by UCJ and CCCJ 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) or B 2:2 (GPA 2.0) or C

Japan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Japan 85% 80% or B or 3.0 70% or C or 2.0

Jordan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3 or 3.5/5 or 75% 2.8 or 65%

Kazakhstan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 5.0/percentage scale 4.5 or 90% 4 or 85% 3.5 or 80%
GPA 4.33 scale 3.9 3.7 3.2
GPA 4.0 scale 3.7 3.4 3

Kenya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kenya First / 70% / A Upper second / 60% / B Lower second / 50% / C

Kosovo

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kosovo 10 9 8

Kuwait

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.6 3.0 2.8

Latvia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Latvia 9 7 6

Lebanon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
American 90% (3.5) 80% (3.2) 70% (2.8)
French 18 15 12

Liberia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's 4.0 or 90% 3.5 or 85% 3 or 80%

Libya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
BSc Engineering, Architecture, Medicine 85 (3.6) 75 (3.0) 65 (2.5)
Other bachelor's degree from a university 90 (4.0) 85% (3.6) 75% (3.0)

Lithuania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lithuania 9 8 7

Macau

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macau 1st or GPA 3.7 2:1 or GPA 3.0 2:2 or GPA 2.5

Macedonia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macedonia 10 9 8

Malawi

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's only MSc 75% MSc 70% MSc 65%

Malaysia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification First Class 2.1 2.2
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Malta

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Malta 1st (80%) 2:1 (70%) 2:2 (55%)

Mauritius

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Mauritius 1st or 70% 2:1 or 60% 2:2 or 50%

Mexico

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Mexico 9 8 7

Moldova

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma de Licenţă (Diploma of Licentiate) 10 9 8

Mongolia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Диплом Специалиста (Specialist Diploma) 90% or 3.5 80% or GPA 3.2 70% or GPA 3.0

Morocco

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Morocco 17 15 13

Mozambique

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year Licenciatura 16 14 12

Myanmar (Burma)

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
2 year Master's degree 5 or 85% 5 or 75% 4.5 or 65%

Namibia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Namibia 80% or A 70% or B 60% or C

Nepal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's (after 3 year bachelor degree) 90% or 3.9 GPA 80% or 3.8 GPA 65% or 3.3 GPA

Netherlands

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Netherlands 8 7 6

New Zealand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Honours degree (480 credits) - Level 8 First (7.0) Upper Second (6.0) Lower Second (4.0)

Nicaragua

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciatura (4 year) 90% 80% 70%

Nigeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
7 point Scale 6 5 4
5 point scale 4.5 3.8 3.5
4 point scale 3.5 3 2.5

Norway

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Norway A B C

Oman

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.5

Pakistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Public Universities 4 Year degree only First with distinction (75%) / 4.0 First (65%) / 3.2 Second (59%) / 2.6
Private Universities 4 Year degree only First with Distinction (85%) First (75%) First (65%)
2 or 3 year bachelor's plus Master's First (60%) Second (55%) Second (50%)

Palestine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor Degree A / 90% / 3.7 B+ / 85% / 3.3 B / 80% / 3.0

Panama

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 91 (A) 81 (B) 71 (C)

Papua New Guinea

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Papua New Guinea 1st 2:1 2:2

Paraguay

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Paraguay - 4 3.5

Peru

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Título de Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 14 13 12

Philippines

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from prestigious state universities or Centres of Excellence (COE) Summa Cum Laude 4.0 / 96% / 1.0 Magna cum Laude 3.5 / 92% / 1.5 Cum Laude 3.0 / 87%/ 2.0

Poland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor Degree (post 2003) Magister (pre- 2003) 5 4.5 / 4+ 4

Portugal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Portugal 18 16 14

Qatar

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Romania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma de Licenta/ Diploma de Inginer 9 8 7

Russia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Russia 4.5 4.0 3.5

Rwanda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year bachelor (Hons) degree (480 credits) 1st, 16/20 (80%) 2:1,14/20 (70%) 2:2, 12/20 (60%)

Saudi Arabia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8
GPA 5.0 scale 4.5 3.75 3.5

Senegal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Maitrise, Diplome d'Etude Approfondies,Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures Specialisees 16/20 or Tres Bien 14/20 or Bien 12/20 or Assez Bien

Serbia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplomirani/ Bachelor's degree 9 8 7

Sierra Leone

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification - 2:1 2:2
Percentage grading - 60-69% 50-59%
Letter grading - B+ B

Singapore

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification First Upper second Lower second
GPA 4.0 scale 3.7 3.0 2.7
GPA 5.0 scale 4.5 3.5 3.0

Slovakia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Slovakia 1.5 or B 2.0 or C 2.5 or C/high D

Slovenia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Slovenia 9.5 8.5 7

South Africa

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification 1st 2:1 2:2
Percentage scale 75-100% 70-74% 60-69%

South Korea

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA out of 4.5 4.0 / A 3.5 / B 3.0 / C+
GPA out of 4.3 4.0 / A 3.0 / B 2.7 / C+

Spain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado / Título de Ingeniero / Título de Arquitecto 8.5 7 6.5
UCM grading 3.0 2.0 1.5

Sri Lanka

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sri Lanka 70% 60% 55%

Sudan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sudan (North and South) 1st or 70% or B+ 2:1 or 66% Mid 2:2 or 60% or B

Sweden

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sweden - Overall grade of VG with a minimum of 90 credits at VG Overall grade of G with a minimum of 90 credits at G

Switzerland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Switzerland 6 5 4

Syria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
State universities 4 years of study 80% 70% 60%
Private universities 4 years of study 90% 80% 70%

Taiwan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Category 1 (4 year degree) 80% 75% 70%
Category 2 (4 year degree) 85% 80% 75%

Tajikistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tajikistan - 4.5 4

Tanzania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tanzania 1st 2:1 2:2

Thailand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.2 2.8

Trinidad and Tobago

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
For degrees studied at The University of West Indies or degrees accredited by ACTT 1st or B+ or 70% 2:1 or B or 65% 2:2 or B- or 60%

Tunisia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence, Maîtrise, Diplôme National d'Ingénieu 15 (tres bien) 14 (bien) 11 (assez bien)

Turkey

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lisans Diplomasi or a Műhendis Diplomasi 3.5 3 2.5

Turkmenistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Turkmenistan - 4.5 4

Uganda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Uganda 1st or 4.4 2:1 or 3.8 2:2 or 3.0

Ukraine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Dyplom Magistra or a Bachelors degree (11 / 5) 11 or 5 9 or 4.5 8 or 4

United Arab Emirates

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.6

United States of America

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.2 2.8

Uruguay

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado (4 year) 10 9 8

Uzbekistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavr Diplomi / Diplomi (Specialist Diploma) 90% or GPA 4.5 80% or GPA 4.0 70% or GPA 3.0

Venezuela

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado/Professional title. (4 year) 18/20 or 8/9 16/20 or 7/9 14/20 or 6/9

Vietnam

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Vietnam 8.0 7.0 6.0

Zambia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's A or 4.0 or 80% B+, 3.5 or 70% B or 3.0 or 60%

Zimbabwe

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
3/4 year degree 1st or 75% 2:1 or 65% 2:2 or 60%

English language requirements

Applicants must meet the minimum English Language requirements. Further details are available on the International website.

Fees and funding

UK / EU fee

Full-time degree per annum
£10,950

International fee

Full-time degree per annum
£23,500

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. University fees and charges can be paid in advance and there are several methods of payment, including online payments and payment by instalment.

The fee stated is for a full-time student undertaking a master’s programme of 180 credits. Part-time students should divide the published fee by 180 credits and then multiply by the number of credits they are taking to calculate their tuition fees.

Find out more about master's degree funding