MA Strategic Communication degree

Entry requirements
2:1 +
Full-time
1 year
Part-time
Not available
Start date
September 2020
UK / EU fee
£9,300
International fee
£19,100
Location
Loughborough
Application status
Open

Overview

The MA Strategic Communication is designed to provide you with an in-depth understanding of the uses, and abuses, of communication by a range of government, corporate and third sector organisations.

As part of the course, we will be asking you to think critically about some of the following questions:

  • How do companies position themselves in an increasingly competitive marketplace? How do they manage crises and respond to challenges?
  • How are governments, local, regional and national promoting their policies to stakeholders across the globe? What is the role of high-profile media events in this process?
  • Are social media platforms turning us all into brands? Should we be worried about the rise of branding culture? Are digital technologies empowering and who do they benefit? 

Throughout this master's in Strategic Communication, there will be a particular focus on how different organisations develop and realise key strategies in the communication of not only products and ideas but also places and experiences. Of particular interest will be changes in these communication practices as a result of both digitalisation and globalisation, and there will opportunities to engage with theoretical approaches, as well as practical examples and case studies from around the world.

Who should study this programme?

Our master's in communication is ideal for students with an interest in communication studies, specifically the role of communications in political, corporate and third sector messaging and positioning. It also provides an ideal foundation for those wanting to build a career in the marketing, public relations, advocacy and campaign management sectors.

Why you should choose us

Why you should study this degree

What makes this programme different?

  • Insights from scholars working in a range of different disciplines – communications and media, branding, public relations, political science, international relations and social interaction
  • Small class sizes mean that we get to know you and your interests
  • A focus on the communication strategies of corporate, government and third way organisations, equipping you with the skills and knowledge to pursue a career in these sectors.

What you'll study

The modules on this programme will provide you with the opportunity to examine both historical and contemporary campaigns, events and media platforms. You will explore the work of different stakeholders and how they have used various strategies and technologies to communicate key messages.

The following information is intended as an example only and is based on module information for the 2019/20 year of entry. Modules are reviewed on an annual basis and may be subject to future changes. Updated Programme and Module Specifications are made available ahead of each academic year. Please see Terms and Conditions of Study for more information.

Semester 1

Understanding Modern Media (15 credits)

This module will see you develop a critical understanding of key concepts and advanced debates relevant to the understanding of modern media. You will focus on the role of media and communications systems in both the historical formation of modern societies and their contemporary transformations under the impact of the Internet and digital platforms.

Module content

Topics covered may include:

  • defining modern media
  • the idea of modernity
  • media and power
  • communication technologies and modern societies
  • media and identity
  • the public sphere.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the major theories and concepts relevant to the understanding of modern media
  • critically discuss competing arguments about the role of media and communication technologies in the formation of modern societies and their contemporary transformations
  • apply abstract social and cultural theories and concepts to concrete examples drawn from historical and contemporary media and culture
  • critically assess competing arguments about modern media and communications
  • retrieve and organise information drawn from different sources
  • formulate cogent arguments and express them effectively in written form
  • retrieve and critically assess information from electronic and other sources relevant to the module.

Teaching and learning

  • seminars: 2 hours
  • lectures: 18 hours
  • guided independent study: 130 hours

Assessment

  • 3,000-word essay: 100%

Introduction to Strategic Communication

The aim of this module is to develop a critical understanding of contemporary arguments about, and advanced research on, strategic
communication, paying particular attention to the socio-economic and policy frameworks, and technological shifts, that inform and shape these practices.

This module is likely to study the following topics: defining strategic communication; propaganda and persuasion; social and political activism; place branding; media events and soft and dark power; cultural diplomacy; political campaigning; health communications; and  social interaction.

Learning outcomes

On completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of key issues and concepts relating to strategic communication
  • Describe the strategies of various commercial, governmental and thirdway organisations during particular historical periods
  • Understand the wider socio-economic and policy frameworks, as well as key technological developments, that impact on the practices of strategic communication
  • Critically evaluate the role of strategic communication in a range of organisational contexts
  • Draw on different theoretical approaches to interrogate the wider socioeconomic and policy frameworks that impact the practices of strategic communication
  • Assess the impact of technological shifts on the ways in which different organisations look to engage with stakeholders
  • Conduct a search of the relevant literature to identify key concepts and arguments
  • Write a report on a given case study or organisation, applying insights from relevant academic approaches and arguments
  • Work as a group to research a given topic and verbally communicate key findings
  • Engage in critical debate and argumentation in written work
  • Retrieve and organise information drawn from different sources
  • Formulate cogent arguments and express them effectively in written and verbal form
  • Retrieve and critically assess information from electronic and other sources relevant to the module
  • Work flexibly, creatively both independently and as part of a group.

Assessment

  • Group presentation (20%)
  • Report 2000 words (80%)

Researching Communications 1: Media Users and Cultural Institutions (15 credits)

This module will develop your knowledge and understanding of a range of methodologies for the analysis of media users and institutions. The module focuses on critically discussing how qualitative, quantitative and mixed methodologies are applied, identifying their strengths and shortcomings.

Module content

Topics covered may include:

  • approaches to social research in media users and cultural institutions data
  • interviews
  • focus groups
  • ethnographies
  • surveys and sampling
  • questionnaire design
  • social networks analysis
  • approaches to mixed methods
  • analysis of data using Nvivo and SPSS.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • recognise how research methods are used for the study of media users and industries data
  • identify the main features of a range of qualitative, quantitative and mixed research methods, and explain their advantages and disadvantages under different research contexts
  • summarise and explain the outcomes of their application to the analysis of media users and industries
  • discuss the tensions that divide particular research methods and the benefits that can be derived from their combination
  • select and apply appropriate theoretical and empirical knowledge of research methods to appraise their wider analytical value and significance
  • summarise and clearly communicate the diverse ways in which media users and industries data is collected and analysed by showing awareness of diverse research methods
  • link empirical findings to wider theoretical debates concerning cultural industries and audiences.

Teaching and learning

  • lectures: 12 hours
  • seminars: 16 hours
  • guided independent study: 122 hours

Assessment

  • 3,000-word coursework assingment: 100%

Semester 2

Researching Communications 2: Texts and Digital Platforms (15 credits)

This module will introduce you to state-of-the-art research methods that are applied for the analysis of media and communication content and output on both traditional and new digital platforms. As well as providing you with a critical overview and discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of these methods, the module will explore their practical application in adjacent workshops.

Module content

The module will cover some of the most commonly used methods and techniques for researching content and outputs of mediated and interpersonal communication, including:

  • content analysis
  • thematic analysis
  • critical discourse analysis
  • conversation analysis
  • different approaches to collecting and analysing data from social media and online platforms.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • identify the key characteristics of some of the most commonly used methods for researching the content and outputs of mediated communication, both qualitative and quantitative, including the assessment of their strengths and weaknesses in different research contexts
  • relate specific methods to appropriate theoretical background
  • explain the applicability of particular methods to specific research settings and conditions
  • compare and contrast the usefulness, limits and potential of each of the research methods to advance particular research aims
  • examine media and communication content and outputs from different methodological standpoints
  • critically assess the way media and communication content is produced across different kinds of platforms
  • collect primary data that emerge as an outcome of both mediated and interpersonal communication
  • know where and how to find secondary data
  • find and evaluate scholarly sources
  • synthesise scholarly and primary sources.

Teaching and learning:

  • seminars: 8 hours
  • lectures: 12 hours
  • guided independent study: 130 hours

Assessment

  • 2 x 1,500-word reports: 100% (50% each)

Semester 1&2

Key Debates in Strategic Communication

This two-semester module will introduce you to current popular and political debates and issues relating to strategic communication. The module will use policy documents, industry reports and stakeholder-produced materials to explore debates on how different organisations communicate to various stakeholders, the ways in which these practices are changing over time, and the intended and actual role of different stakeholders in these developments and debates.

Learning outcomes

On completion of the module, students should be able to:

  • describe key contemporary debates about the uses of strategic communication by various organisations
  • discuss the socio-economic and policy frameworks, as well technological shifts, that shape these practices over time
  • identify and evaluate the role of stakeholders (commercial organisations, consumers, government agencies) in these processes and debates
  • describe and critically evaluate popular and critical perspectives on strategic communication practices
  • explain the different ways in which strategic communication is conceived and evaluated by various stakeholder groups
  • assess the impact of changing technologies on these practices and the debates they engender
  • use material presented in teaching sessions and in private study to evaluate popular and critical arguments about the uses of strategic communication by various organisations
  • use material presented in teaching sessions to develop distinctive arguments on different policy and regulatory issues
  • relate material presented in teaching sessions to key theoretical debates in strategic communication
  • find and evaluate key issues and viewpoints relating to a given topic
  • communicate effectively in speech as part of oral presentation and group discussions
  • synthesise scholarly and primary sources for use in argument
  • engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation.

Assessment

  • Presentation 1 - Semester 1 (20%)
  • Presentation 2 - Semester 2 (80%)

 

Dissertation

This module, taken over two semesters, will allow you to develop employability and academic skills relevant to conducting an individual research project. You will undertake a piece of research relating to strategic communication on a topic of your choice, and will pursue this research in depth and with rigour. This final project will build on the methodological skills developed in earlier projects.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • describe and discuss the principles of good scholarly practice
  • select the relevant theoretical perspectives for the exploration of their chosen topic
  • give a critical assessment of the theoretical perspectives relevant to their chosen topic
  • describe and evaluate relevant methodological perspectives
  • describe and critically evaluate relevant empirical data
  • describe and discuss the process of gaining employment in the media and cultural industries
  • apply principles of good scholarly practice to their written work
  • develop a clear, coherent and original research question
  • apply abstract theories and models to primary and/or secondary data on their chosen subject
  • critically evaluate literature relevant to their chosen topic
  • synthesise relevant sources (e.g. research literature, primary data to construct a coherent argument in response to their research question
  • use knowledge about employment in media and cultural industries in written academic work
  • conduct a literature search
  • apply relevant research methodologies
  • use discussions in tutorials to develop a coherent argument in relation to their chosen topic
  • engage in critical debate and argumentation in written work
  • write a CV and covering letter relevant to employment in the creative and cultural industries
  • identify the ethical issues associated with conducting a research project.

Assessment

  • Academic Scholarship Test (5%)
  • Dissertation (95%)

Semester 1

Media & Cultural Industries: Political Economy & Public Policy (15 Credits)

This module will outline the major conceptual and empirical questions raised by work on the political economy of the cultural and media industries and on the sociology and anthropology of cultural and media production. You will examine the changes that have taken place in the cultural and media industries under the impact of technological change and marketisation since the 1970s and explore the questions these changes raise for public policy.

Module content

You will be introduced to the major themes and arguments in the political economy of culture and media, and the sociology and anthropology of cultural and media production. Changes in the organisation of the cultural and media industries over the last 25 years will be discussed and current debates on public policy in the areas of culture will be explored.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • identify and deploy the major theories and frameworks of inquiry relevant to the cultural and media industries
  • evaluate critically the conceptual and methodological strengths and weaknesses of contending positions on changes in media and cultural industries
  • assess the impact of changes in the cultural industries on public policy
  • describe and critically evaluate relevant theoretical perspectives on media and cultural industries
  • find and evaluate scholarly sources;
  • synthesise scholarly and primary sources for use in argument
  • engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation.

Teaching and learning

  • seminars: 10 hours
  • lectures: 20 hours
  • guided independent study: 120 hours

Assessment

  • 1,000-word company report: 30%
  • 2,000-word essay: 70%

Social Media and Political Communication

This module examines the impact of social media on political life. By the end of the module students will have an understanding of the key issues around social media as well as a critical perspective on what the term actually means. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the United States and Britain.

This module will explore a number of topics, including: Digital Media, Politics and Society: Key Concepts; The History of Networks; Journalism, News and the Changing Media Environment; Movements, Mobilization and Protest; Community, Deliberation and Participation; The New Politics of Power and Democracy; Surveillance, Privacy and Security; Misinformation and disinformation; Parties, Candidates and Data.

Learning outcomes

On completion of the module, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the most significant themes and developments in the relationships between social media and political communication
  • Effectively define and critically appraise key terms in the political analysis of contemporary media technologies
  • Apply and critically scrutinize empirical and normative theories of communication and politics in order to understand how communication and media affect politics and how politics affects communication and media
  • Critically analyse and evaluate evidence regarding social media and political communication including written and audiovisual material
  • Communicate clearly, construct coherent arguments about social media and political communication, both in seminars and in written work
  • Work independently on research tasks in order to formulate hypotheses, devise methodologies appropriate to a research task, and generate research materials related to social media and political communication
  • Adapt knowledge to specific contexts
  • Produce critical analysis in the form of writing for a student research blog
  • Produce critical analysis with supporting material including images, infographics, and video for a student research blog
  • Critically evaluating a range of academic and industry sources
  • Communicating effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences
  • Deploying qualitative and quantitative research techniques
  • Planning, organising and managing, with appropriate supervision, a significant self-directed project
  • Working flexibly, creatively and independently, displaying a high degree of self-direction and initiative
  • Demonstrate skills and abilities learned in relation to your own continuing professional development.

Assessment

  • 100% research blog

Digital Economies (15 credits)

This module will introduce you to the economic sociology of digital media by examining the relationship between new social practices and old economic structures.

Module content

The Internet is playing an increasing role in the lives of people around the globe and in the process is transforming many aspects of the ways in which we interact; yet this is a landscape that is contoured in other respects by the structure of the global economic system.

The material will be approached by examining the variety of roles that are implicated in the creation, delivery and consumption of cultural/media products over the Internet and by examining the symbolic struggles that have occurred over legitimacy in digital culture: for example, we can trace a continuing tension and indeed interaction between the growth of the digital market economy and advocacy of the Internet as a de-commercialised space.

While the primary focus will be on contemporary cases, the module will also seek to relate these back to classic issues in economic sociology. For example, Polanyi's account of the dependency of markets on the state, which is exemplified by the critical role of intellectual property rights in the digital industries, and the debate on the embeddedness of the economy in social interaction.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • critically discuss the socio-economic roles involved in the delivery/consumption of culture and media over the Internet and the ways in which these are changing in response to a mix of social, technological, and economic factors
  • understand and critically evaluate some of the central theoretical perspectives of economic sociology as these relate to the contemporary Internet economy
  • explain the relationships and tensions between old and new socio-economic practices and structures in the digital environment
  • evaluate critically the conceptual and methodological strengths and weaknesses of competing positions
  • study particular cases informed by general frameworks of analysis
  • discuss historical transformations in digital media and wield this understanding in appraising current patterns of development
  • communicate effectively in speech and writing
  • critically evaluate a range of academic and industry sources.

Teaching and learning

  • tutorials: 2 hours
  • lectures: 18 hours
  • guided independent study: 130 hours

Assessment

  • 1,000-word report: 25%
  • 2,500-word essay: 75%

Marketing Politics (15 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the marketing of politics by exploring and analysing election campaigns from a contemporary as well as an historical perspective. A major focus is on appreciating and understanding the increasingly important role of advertising, public relations and market research techniques, approaches and personnel in attempts to win and maintain voter support for candidates vying for public office. This will be done through close analysis of developments in countries with some of the most high profile elections, notably the United States and United Kingdom. The US hosts a large and globally influential industry of campaign consultants and their impact both at home and abroad will be reviewed and scrutinised. Here, particular consideration will be devoted to the ethical and democratic consequences of the growing use of this kind of 'packaged politics'.

Module content

  • Topics studied may include:
  • theoretical and empirical approaches to political marketing
  • the selling of the US president in an historical perspective
  • the evolution of British election campaigns
  • ethical and democratic consequences of 'marketisation' of democracy.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • critically discuss the nature and consequences of the marketisation of the democratic process
  • analytically understand the structure and function of professional campaign consultants
  • apply relevant theoretical perspectives in exploring the dynamics of election campaigns
  • account for the origins and development of campaign consultancy with specific reference to the highly influential American and British case histories
  • interpret and analyse the various controversies and debates as to the role and influence of political marketing professionals both in historical and contemporary contexts
  • engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation
  • undertake relevant data retrieval and analytical evaluation
  • study particular cases informed by general frameworks of analysis.

Teaching and learning

  • seminars: 2 hours
  • lectures: 18 hours
  • guided independent study: 130 hours

Assessment

  • 1,500-word written analysis on historical election campaigning: 50%
  • 1,500-word written analysis on contemporary events: 50%

Semester 2

Politics of Representation (15 Credits)

This module will develop your critical understanding of current debates and advanced research about the politics of representation. You will also develop skills relevant to the analysis of the involvement of media and cultural forms in social inclusion and exclusion.

Module content

Topics covered may include: 

  • discourse, power, knowledge
  • stereotyping and the other
  • spaces of identity and belonging
  • nationalism, racism and imperialism
  • Orientalism
  • migration and the media.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • deploy the major theories and concepts relevant to the understanding of the politics of representation in historical and contemporary media and cultural forms
  • critically discuss competing arguments about the politics of representation
  • apply abstract social and cultural theories and concepts to concrete examples drawn from historical and contemporary media and culture
  • critically assess competing arguments about the politics of representation
  • apply analytical techniques relevant to the involvement of media and cultural forms in social inclusion and exclusion
  • retrieve and organise information drawn from different sources
  • formulate cogent arguments and express them effectively in written form
  • retrieve and critically assess information from electronic and other sources relevant to the module.

Teaching and learning:

  • Seminars: 2 hours
  • Lectures: 18 hours
  • Guided independent study: 130 hours

Assessment

  • 3,000-word analytical report: 100%

Data, Power and Democracy

This module addresses the ways in which social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, WhatsApp. and Snapchat are changing the ways in which political actors, citizens, and journalists interact with each other, advance their goals, and exercise power. We will engage with contemporary arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media by drawing on state-of-the-art theory and cutting-edge research, as well as case studies of relevant contemporary events and controversies.

The module will enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, political actors, and journalists to access, distribute, and coproduce content that is relevant to public affairs and provide opportunities for political learning, persuasion, mobilization, and engagement. It will use both theory and empirical research to shed light on how social media are enhancing and hindering practices and structures of citizenship and democratic politics.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate thorough knowledge of the international debates on the role of social media in contemporary political communication processes and democratic governance
  • Develop empirically founded knowledge of social media that is relevant to different fields and actors of political communication, such as parties, social movements, news organisations, and citizens
  • Critically situate the forms of political behaviour and citizenship enabled by social media in the context of contemporary media systems
  • Critically evaluate the effects of social media on citizens¿ political attitudes and behaviour
  • Critically evaluate the various methodologies that can be used to study political behaviour on social media and the different challenges that they entail
  • Critically analyse texts and public arguments
  • Deliver professional and effective presentations
  • Communicate clearly and construct coherent arguments, both in seminars and in written work
  • Provide constructive feedback on peers' work and improve work based on your peers' feedback
  • Adapt knowledge to specific contexts and types of social actors
  • Appreciate the possibilities and limitations of social science research in the digital age
  • Producing analysis as an individual in the form of an essay
  • Presenting effectively in class the results of analysis, using presentation software
  • Working effectively in a team to mind map the main themes of topic areas in social media and political communication
  • Working effectively as a team on social media data analysis and designing a simulated online campaign
  • Critically evaluating a range of academic and industry sources
  • Communicate effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences
  • Deploy qualitative and quantitative research techniques
  • Plan, organise and manage, with appropriate supervision, a significant self-directed project
  • Work flexibly, creatively and independently, displaying a high degree of self-direction and initiative
  • Demonstrate skills and abilities learned in relation to your own continuing professional development.

Assessment

  • Essay 1500 words (50%)
  • Social Media Campaign Design and Simulation (50%)

Political Psychology

The aim of this module is to introduce students to key issues and debates in contemporary political psychology.

The module is likely to explore tha range of topics, including: contemporary approaches to the study of political behaviour; collective memory; national identity and how societies remember; the political psychology of extremism, social identity and collective acttion; political rhetoric and political communication.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module students should be able to:

  • Explain the interconnectedness between psychological theory and political behaviour
  • Describe the contribution of original research and scholarship to our understanding of the relationship between psychology, politics and society
  • Examine social psychological principles and theories with relevance to explaining political behaviour
  • Develop and argument and engage in reasonable debate
  • Present effectively research evidence and chair pertinent conclusions
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing.

Assessment

100% coursework consisting of a 3000 word essay.

 

Media and Cultural Work: Inequality and Discrimination in the Creative Industries (15 credits)

This module will give you an understanding of:

  1. the major conceptual and empirical questions raised by research of media and cultural work
  2. the changes that have taken place in media and media cultural work under the impact of technological change, marketisation and internationalisation since the 1970s
  3. the extent and nature of inequalities and discrimination in media and cultural work.

Module content

Topics studied may include:

  • the growth in employment in media and cultural industries
  • the changing character of that employment
  • the internationalisation of media and cultural labour
  • the extent and nature of inequalities and discrimination in media and cultural work (eg on the grounds of gender and ethnicity).

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • demonstrate a thorough knowledge of the major theories and frameworks of inquiry relevant to the subject area of the module through discussion sessions and coursework
  • evaluate critically the conceptual and methodological strengths and weaknesses of contending positions
  • understand and apply the research methods relevant to the module topics
  • understand the extent and character of employment in media and cultural industries and demonstrate this through class discussions and coursework. This will require you to summarise and criticise academic and other literature and to illustrate theories and concepts used in your coursework and with relevant examples.
  • understand abstract ideas and apply them to concrete topics and issues
  • think reflexively about your own research and the issues it raises
  • demonstrate well-developed writing and interpersonal communication abilities.

Teaching and learning

  • seminars: 2 hours
  • lectures: 18 hours
  • guided independent study: 130 hours

Assessment

  • 3,000-word report: 100%

Digital Cultures (15 Credits)

This module will foster your ability to critically analyse current research and advanced scholarship about digital cultures. It will familiarise you with major debates, theories and the latest studies on issues such as young people and digital media, social networking, identities, communities and relationships, and online consumption.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • discuss the major issues and arguments in contemporary debates about the social and cultural impact of digital media
  • assess the merits of social and communication theories and explanations related to digital media
  • evaluate and interpret social and communications research evidence on digital media
  • analyse emergent trends in digital culture and interrogate common sense understandings and received wisdom in this area
  • locate and evaluate sources of information
  • synthesise and reflect on information
  • communicate and present information eg construct written arguments, contribute to group discussions

Module content

Topics covered may include:

  • the internet and identity
  • online communities
  • mobile media
  • social networking
  • digital media and romantic/sexual relations
  • digital media and consumption.

Teaching and learning

  • tutorials: 2 hours
  • lectures: 16 hours
  • guided independent study: 132 hours

Assessment

  • 1,500-word essay: 40%
  • 2,000-word essay: 60%

Cultural Memory and Heritage Industries (15 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the politics of cultural memory and cultural heritage in the modern period. You will examine debates around the temporal structures of modernity and the manner in which the past is used as a rhetorical and commercial resource in the cultural industries. You will also critically evaluate the rise of the heritage industries from national and global perspectives.

Module content

Topics studied may include:

  • theoretical and empirical approaches to mediated/cultural memory
  • key debates in memory studies
  • the structure of the heritage industries from a national and global perspective
  • the communicative practices of heritage industries (film, television, new media and museums)
  • the impact of digital technologies on cultural memory and heritage industries
  • the politics of commemoration.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module you will be able to:

  • describe the changing temporal structure of modern societies;
  • iscuss the rise of the heritage industry in contemporary society;
  • evaluate competing arguments about the historical, social and political value of the heritage industry
  • describe and critically evaluate relevant theoretical perspectives on heritage industries
  • explain the role of the heritage industries in the construction of personal and collective identities
  • explain the relationship between heritage and cultural memory
  • use material presented in teaching sessions and in private study to evaluate theoretical arguments
  • apply material presented in teaching sessions and in private study to locate and explain a heritage case study
  • collect primary data
  • find and evaluate scholarly sources
  • synthesise scholarly and primary sources for use in argument
  • engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation.

Teaching and learning

  • seminars: 2 hours
  • lectures: 18 hours
  • guided independent study: 130 hours

Assessment

  • 1,000-word critical review: 30%
  • 2,000-word professional proposal: 70%

How you'll be assessed

You will be assessed via a range of assignments, including essays, company reports, group presentations and an end of year research project. For full details, please see the module descriptions above.

How you'll study

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Independent study
  • Group work
  • Workshops

Your personal and professional development

The School of Social Sciences and Humanities is committed to helping you develop the skills and attributes you need to progress successfully in your chosen career.

Future career prospects

The masters in strategic communication will provide an excellent platform for those looking to build a career in advertising, marketing, public relations, advocacy, campaign management, place branding and market research.

Graduate destinations

Graduates of our postraduate communication and media programmes have gone on to enjoy careers within a diverse range of organisations, including ADVENTI Communication, Bloomberg Businessweek China, Brightwire News, China Daily, Fujian Broadcasting & TV Network Group, Hakka TV, Jiangsu Broadcasting Coorporation, KPMG, Land Crawford Ltd, QS Intelligance Unit, Shanghai Media Group, Viacom, and Xinhua News Agency; and in a wide variety of roles, such as Editor on New Media, Journalist, Marketing Coordinator, Marketing Communication Manager, Media Coordinator, Media Producer, Multi-screen Interactive Editor, News Centre Video Director, Reporter, and Writer.

Your personal development

Loughborough University prides itself on the high calibre of its graduates and provides great opportunities for you to develop the skills and attributes you need to progress successfully in your chosen career. On successful completion of this programme, you will be able to:

  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the major traditions, theories and frameworks of inquiry relevant to the analysis of strategic communication and associated disciplines
  • Use advanced concepts and theories drawn from the field of strategic communication and related disciplines to analyse relevant empirical evidence
  • Generate research data according to set procedures and methods within the discipline of media, communication and cultural studies
  • Critically evaluate a range of academic and industry sources
  • Communicate effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences, both working independently and as part of a group
  • Plan, organise and manage, with appropriate supervision, a significant self-directed project.

Entry requirements

Our entry requirements are listed using standard UK undergraduate degree classifications i.e. first-class honours, upper second-class honours and lower second-class honours. To learn the equivalent for your country, please choose it from the dropdown below.

Entry requirements for United Kingdom

A 2:1 honours degree (or equivalent international qualification) in the social sciences or humanities.

Afghanistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Masters 95% 85% 70%

Albania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplomë e Nivelit të Pare (First Level (University) Diploma (from 2010) 9.5 8.5 8

Algeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence (4 year) / Diplome d'Inginieur d'Etat / Diplôme d'Etudes Supérieures 16 14 12

Argentina

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Argentina 8.5 7.5 6.0

Armenia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavri Kochum 90% 80% 70%
Magistrosi Kochum 3.9 3.5 3.0

Australia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Honours degree (AQF level 8) First Class, 80% Upper Second, 70%, H2A Lower Second, 60%, 2B
Ordinary degree - AQF Level 7 pass (mark 46 or 50) High Distinction (80% or 85%) Distinction (75% or 80%) Distinction (70% or 75%)

Austria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree/ Diplomstudium / Magister degree A (or 1.5) mit Auszeichnungbestanden 60% or B or 3.0 (or 2) 50% or C or 2.7 (or 3)

Azerbaijan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavr Diplomu 4.5 4 3.5
Diplomu (Specialist Diploma) 90% 80% 70%

Bahamas

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Bahrain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Bangladesh

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
BUET or 'Good Private' University - 4 year degree BUET - 1st (70%) / 3.5 BUET - 2nd (60%) / 3.0 BUET - 2nd (55%) / 2.75
Other universities - Masters (1-2 years) following a 3 or 4 year degree 80% / 4.0 65% / 3.25 50% / 2.5

Barbados

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Barbados - Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Belarus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Specialist Diploma (5Yr) 9 7 5

Belgium

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor degree Magna Cum Laude Cum Laude 60%/12
Licenciaat 80% 70% 60%
Licencie 17 14 12

Belize

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Benin

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Maitrise 18 15 or Bien 12 or Assez Bien

Bermuda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of the West Indies only 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) 2:2 (GPA 2.5)

Bolivia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
A Licenciado, 4 years Private (public/private) 85/78 75/66 67/55

Bosnia and Herzegovina

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma Visokog Obrazovanja / Diplomirani 10 9 8

Botswana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's degree A or 80% B or 70% C or 60%

Brazil

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brazil - 4 yr Bacharel or Licenciado/Licenciatura or Título Profissional 8.5 (A) 7.5 6.0

Brunei

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brunei First Upper Second (60%/B/3.1) Lower Second (50%/C/2.7)

Bulgaria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 yr Diploma za Zavarsheno Visshe Obrazovanie (Diploma of Completed Higher Education) 6 5 4

Cambodia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 years 90% or 9 or 4.0 80% or 8 or 3.5 70% or 7 or 3.0

Cameroon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor degree or Diplome d'Etudes Superiures de Commerce 1st or 15 2:1 or 14 2:2 or 12.5
Diplome d'Ingenieur or Diplôme d'Ingénieur de Conception or a Maitrise or a 4 year Licence 20 or GPA 3.7 20 or Bien (GPA 3.4) 20 or Assez Bien (GPA 3.1)

Canada

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0/percentage scale 3.7/85% 3.3/75% 2.7/68%
Out of 9 8 6 5
Out of 12 10 8 6

Chile

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Grado de Licenciado / Título (Profesional) de [subject area] (4 years) 6 5.5 5

China

Students are required to have a bachelor degree (4 years) for entry to a postgraduate programme. The University uses the Shanghai Academic Ranking of World Universities to identify the required final mark, as outlined on the table below:

First class (70%) Mid 2:1 (65%) 2:1 (60%) Mid 2:2 (55%) 2:2 (50%)
Shanghai Rank Top 250 85% 81% 80% 78% 77%
Shanghai Rank 251-500 89% 84% 83% 81% 80%
Shanghai Rank 501+ 92% 87% 86% 85% 82%

Affiliated colleges

The University will consider students from Affiliated Colleges in the following way:

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities in the top 250 Shanghai rankings will considered if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 80%-84%.

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities which are 251-500 in the Shanghai rankings will considered if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 82%-87%.

Applicants from colleges affiliated to universities which are above 500 in the Shanghai rankings will considered as follows:

  • School of Business and Economics: not considered
  • All other programmes if they have achieved or are likely to achieve final marks of 82%-87%.

Universities given special consideration

Applicants from a small number of Chinese universities that specialise in business, management, finance or creative arts will be given special consideration by the University. The full list of these universities and the Shanghai band under which they will be considered can be found in the PDF below.

Download the list of Chinese universities given special consideration here

Students who do not meet the above requirements may occasionally be considered if they have a relevant degree, can show good grades in relevant subjects, and/or have substantial relevant work experience.

Colombia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 4.5 3.75 3.2

Costa Rica

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado 9 8 or 80 7 or 75

Croatia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Baccalaureus / Prvostupnik 4.5 3.8 3.0

Cuba

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4-year Titulo de Licenciado / Licenciatura 5 4 3

Cyprus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Cyprus 8.5 7.0 6.5

Czech Republic

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalár (after 2001) 6 yr integrated Magistr 1 1.5 2

Denmark

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 year Candidatus/Candidata Magisterii or Bachelor degree (7 point scale) 12 10 7

Dominican Republic

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year Licenciado 3.8 Magna Cum Laude 3.5 Cum Laude 3.2
Título de [subject area] - 85% 82%

Ecuador

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Título de Licenciado 8.5 8 7
Título de [subject area] 85% 80% 70%

Egypt

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Egypt 3.5 3.2 2.8
Universities only BA 90%, BSc 85% BA 80%, BSc 75% BA 65%, BSc 65%

El Salvador

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
5 year Licenciado 8.5 7.5 6.5
Título de Ingeniero 85% 75% 65%
Arquitecto - Muy Bueno Bueno

Estonia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalaureusekraad or Magister or Magistrikraad 5 or A 4 or B 3 or C

Ethiopia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's A/GPA 4.0 A/GPA 3.5 B/GPA 2.8

Finland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kandidaattii/Kandidat (out of 3) 3 2 1
Maisteri/Magister (out of 5) 4.5 3 2.5

France

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence (3 years)/ Maitrise/ Diplôme d'Ingénieur 14 12 11

Georgia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4-year degree (% = new system) 5 (95%) 4.5 (85%) 4 (75%)

Germany

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
German Bachelor/ Diplom, Magister Artium / Zeugnis über den Zweiten Abschnitt der Ärztlichen Prüfung 1.5 2.5 3.0

Ghana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Ghana First Upper second/60% Lower second/50%

Greece

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
AEI 8.5 7.0 6
TEI 8.5 7 6.5

Grenada

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from University of West Indies - classification 1st 2:1 2:2
Degree from University of West Indies - grade / percentage A B / 75% C / 55%
Degree from University of West Indies - GPA 3.6 3.0 2.0

Guatemala

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Liceniado / Titulo de (subject area) - 4years 90% (public university) / 95% (private university) 80% (public university) / 85% (private university) 60% (public university) / 70% (private university)

Guyana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's GPA 4 GPA 3.5 3.0

Honduras

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Título de Licenciado / Grado Académico de Licenciatura (4 year degree) - GPA out of 5 GPA 5 or 90% GPA 4 or 80% GPA 3.5 or 70%

Hong Kong

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.5

Hungary

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Alapfokozt or Egyetemi Oklevel / Bachelor 5 4 3

Iceland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Baccalaurreatus degree or Kandidatsprof/Candidatus Mag 8.5 7.5 6.5

India

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Institutions listed on the Indian Ranking of Higher Educational Institutions Framework 65% (First) 60% (First) 55% (Upper second)
All other Indian institutions 70% (First with distinction) 65% (First) 60% (First)

Indonesia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sarjana I (S1) from A (or B) credited Universities 3.7 (4.0) 3.3 (3.7) 3 (3.3)

Iran

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iran 17 15 13

Iraq

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iraq 80% 75% 70%

Ireland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Republic of Ireland First (70%) Upper second (60%) Lower second (50%)

Israel

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
3 yr Bachelor Degree 90% 80% 70%

Italy

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma di Laurea 109/110 104/110 (or 27) 100/110 (or 26)

Ivory Coast

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplome d'Etude Approfondies, Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures 16 14 (Bien) 12 (Assez Bien)

Jamaica

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
For degrees studied at The University of West Indies or degrees accredited by UCJ and CCCJ 1st (GPA 3.6) 2:1 (GPA 3.0) or B 2:2 (GPA 2.0) or C

Japan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Japan 85% 80% or B or 3.0 70% or C or 2.0

Jordan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3 or 3.5/5 or 75% 2.8 or 65%

Kazakhstan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 5.0/percentage scale 4.5 or 90% 4 or 85% 3.5 or 80%
GPA 4.33 scale 3.9 3.7 3.2
GPA 4.0 scale 3.7 3.4 3

Kenya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kenya First / 70% / A Upper second / 60% / B Lower second / 50% / C

Kosovo

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kosovo 10 9 8

Kuwait

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.6 3.0 2.8

Latvia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Latvia 9 7 6

Lebanon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
American 90% (3.5) 80% (3.2) 70% (2.8)
French 18 15 12

Liberia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's 4.0 or 90% 3.5 or 85% 3 or 80%

Libya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
BSc Engineering, Architecture, Medicine 85 (3.6) 75 (3.0) 65 (2.5)
Other bachelor's degree from a university 90 (4.0) 85% (3.6) 75% (3.0)

Lithuania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lithuania 9 8 7

Macau

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macau 1st or GPA 3.7 2:1 or GPA 3.0 2:2 or GPA 2.5

Macedonia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macedonia 10 9 8

Malawi

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's only MSc 75% MSc 70% MSc 65%

Malaysia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification First Class 2.1 2.2
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Malta

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Malta 1st (80%) 2:1 (70%) 2:2 (55%)

Mauritius

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Mauritius 1st or 70% 2:1 or 60% 2:2 or 50%

Mexico

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Mexico 9 8 7

Moldova

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma de Licenţă (Diploma of Licentiate) 10 9 8

Mongolia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Диплом Специалиста (Specialist Diploma) 90% or 3.5 80% or GPA 3.2 70% or GPA 3.0

Morocco

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Morocco 17 15 13

Mozambique

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year Licenciatura 16 14 12

Myanmar (Burma)

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
2 year Master's degree 5 or 85% 5 or 75% 4.5 or 65%

Namibia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Namibia 80% or A 70% or B 60% or C

Nepal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's (after 3 year bachelor degree) 90% or 3.9 GPA 80% or 3.8 GPA 65% or 3.3 GPA

Netherlands

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Netherlands 8 7 6

New Zealand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Honours degree (480 credits) - Level 8 First (7.0) Upper Second (6.0) Lower Second (4.0)

Nicaragua

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciatura (4 year) 90% 80% 70%

Nigeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
7 point Scale 6 5 4
5 point scale 4.5 3.8 3.5
4 point scale 3.5 3 2.5

Norway

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Norway A B C

Oman

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.5

Pakistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Public Universities 4 Year degree only First with distinction (75%) / 4.0 First (65%) / 3.2 Second (59%) / 2.6
Private Universities 4 Year degree only First with Distinction (85%) First (75%) First (65%)
2 or 3 year bachelor's plus Master's First (60%) Second (55%) Second (50%)

Palestine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor Degree A / 90% / 3.7 B+ / 85% / 3.3 B / 80% / 3.0

Panama

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 91 (A) 81 (B) 71 (C)

Papua New Guinea

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Papua New Guinea 1st 2:1 2:2

Paraguay

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Paraguay - 4 3.5

Peru

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 Year Título de Licenciado / Título de [subject area] 14 13 12

Philippines

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Degree from prestigious state universities or Centres of Excellence (COE) Summa Cum Laude 4.0 / 96% / 1.0 Magna cum Laude 3.5 / 92% / 1.5 Cum Laude 3.0 / 87%/ 2.0

Poland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bachelor Degree (post 2003) Magister (pre- 2003) 5 4.5 / 4+ 4

Portugal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Portugal 18 16 14

Qatar

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Romania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diploma de Licenta/ Diploma de Inginer 9 8 7

Russia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Russia 4.5 4.0 3.5

Rwanda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
4 year bachelor (Hons) degree (480 credits) 1st, 16/20 (80%) 2:1,14/20 (70%) 2:2, 12/20 (60%)

Saudi Arabia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8
GPA 5.0 scale 4.5 3.75 3.5

Senegal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Maitrise, Diplome d'Etude Approfondies,Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures Specialisees 16/20 or Tres Bien 14/20 or Bien 12/20 or Assez Bien

Serbia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Diplomirani/ Bachelor's degree 9 8 7

Sierra Leone

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification - 2:1 2:2
Percentage grading - 60-69% 50-59%
Letter grading - B+ B

Singapore

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification First Upper second Lower second
GPA 4.0 scale 3.7 3.0 2.7
GPA 5.0 scale 4.5 3.5 3.0

Slovakia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Slovakia 1.5 or B 2.0 or C 2.5 or C/high D

Slovenia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Slovenia 9.5 8.5 7

South Africa

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Classification 1st 2:1 2:2
Percentage scale 75-100% 70-74% 60-69%

South Korea

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA out of 4.5 4.0 / A 3.5 / B 3.0 / C+
GPA out of 4.3 4.0 / A 3.0 / B 2.7 / C+

Spain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado / Título de Ingeniero / Título de Arquitecto 8.5 7 6.5
UCM grading 3.0 2.0 1.5

Sri Lanka

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sri Lanka 70% 60% 55%

Sudan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sudan (North and South) 1st or 70% or B+ 2:1 or 66% Mid 2:2 or 60% or B

Sweden

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sweden - Overall grade of VG with a minimum of 90 credits at VG Overall grade of G with a minimum of 90 credits at G

Switzerland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Switzerland 6 5 4

Syria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
State universities 4 years of study 80% 70% 60%
Private universities 4 years of study 90% 80% 70%

Taiwan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Category 1 (4 year degree) 80% 75% 70%
Category 2 (4 year degree) 85% 80% 75%

Tajikistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tajikistan - 4.5 4

Tanzania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tanzania 1st 2:1 2:2

Thailand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.2 2.8

Trinidad and Tobago

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
For degrees studied at The University of West Indies or degrees accredited by ACTT 1st or B+ or 70% 2:1 or B or 65% 2:2 or B- or 60%

Tunisia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licence, Maîtrise, Diplôme National d'Ingénieu 15 (tres bien) 14 (bien) 11 (assez bien)

Turkey

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lisans Diplomasi or a Műhendis Diplomasi 3.5 3 2.5

Turkmenistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Turkmenistan - 4.5 4

Uganda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Uganda 1st or 4.4 2:1 or 3.8 2:2 or 3.0

Ukraine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Dyplom Magistra or a Bachelors degree (11 / 5) 11 or 5 9 or 4.5 8 or 4

United Arab Emirates

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.6

United States of America

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.2 2.8

Uruguay

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado (4 year) 10 9 8

Uzbekistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bakalavr Diplomi / Diplomi (Specialist Diploma) 90% or GPA 4.5 80% or GPA 4.0 70% or GPA 3.0

Venezuela

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Licenciado/Professional title. (4 year) 18/20 or 8/9 16/20 or 7/9 14/20 or 6/9

Vietnam

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Vietnam 8.0 7.0 6.0

Zambia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Master's A or 4.0 or 80% B+, 3.5 or 70% B or 3.0 or 60%

Zimbabwe

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
3/4 year degree 1st or 75% 2:1 or 65% 2:2 or 60%

English language requirements

Applicants must meet the minimum English Language requirements. Further details are available on the International website.

IELTS overall score of 6.5 with not less than 6.0 in each test.

Fees and funding

UK / EU fee

Full-time degree per annum
£9,300

International fee

Full-time degree per annum
£19,100

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. University fees and charges can be paid in advance and there are several methods of payment, including online payments and payment by instalment.

Find out more about master's degree funding