Student handbook

Undergraduate and Postgraduate Taught programmes

Programme Structure

Each year of an undergraduate programme is referred to as a Part.  With the exception of the Placement Year (Part I), each Part is made up of a number of modules worth a total of 120 credits.

Programmes will be structured as follows:

Part F (optional)

Foundation Year (known as Year 0 in some universities)

Part A

Year 1 of degree programme

Part B

Year 2 of degree programme

Part C

Final year of Bachelor’s degree programmes (BA/BArch/BEng/BSc)

Year 3 of Undergraduate Master’s degree programmes (MArch/MChem/MComp/MEng/MMath/MPhys/MSci)

Part D

Final Year of Undergraduate Master’s degree programmes (MArch/MChem/MComp/MEng/MMath/MPhys/MSci)

 

Part I, also referred to as a Placement year, is an Industrial Placement, Erasmus+/International Study Exchange, or combination of Industrial Placement and Erasmus+/International Study Exchange.  Normally Part I will come between Parts B and C although Undergraduate Master’s degree students may have the option to take Part I between Parts C and D.

You must successfully complete one Part of study in order to progress to the next Part.  This means that you cannot do reassessments in modules from one Part whilst studying modules in the next Part, or whilst on your Placement Year*.

*There may be some situations where you are able to do reassessments alongside your placement if you have already started Part I, but these need to be discussed with your School and are subject to approval of a waiver of the regulations.

Undergraduate modules, credits and student workload

Undergraduate programmes of study are organised on a modular basis. At the beginning of the academic year you must register for the appropriate modules specified in your programme regulations and select from any options available.

Full-time undergraduate students take modules with a total weighting of 120 per academic year. Each module typically has a weight of 10, 20 or 30. This is the number of credits you will be awarded on passing the module.

The notional learning time for a 10-credit module is 100 hours, representing the time on average you will need to spend on the whole range of learning activities, including for example lectures, tutorials, private study, preparing coursework, and sitting examinations. The notional learning time for a full-time undergraduate academic year over 30 weeks is 1,200 hours.

Normally your workload will be divided equally between the two semesters and you will take modules with a weight of 60 in each semester. Some modules will run across both semesters but most will be studied and assessed within a single semester. Further information about module weightings, content and assessment components (exams/coursework) can be found in the Module Specification.

Postgraduate Taught modules, credits and student workload

Postgraduate programmes of study are organised on a modular basis. At the beginning of the academic year you must register for the appropriate modules specified in your programme regulations and select from any options available.

Postgraduate students take modules with a total weighting of 180 if they are aiming for a Masters Degree. The figure is lower for those aiming for Certificates and Diplomas. Each module typically has a weight of 10, 20 or 30. This is the number of credits you will be awarded on passing the module.

The notional learning time for a 10-credit module is 100 hours, representing the time on average you will need to spend on the whole range of learning activities, including for example lectures, tutorials, private study, preparing coursework and sitting examinations. The total notional learning time for a Master's student is 1,800 hours.

In a one-year full-time programme your workload will be distributed as evenly as possible but this will depend on the precise arrangements for your programme and you should consult your programme handbook for more details about this. Further information about module weightings, content and assessment components (exams/coursework) can be found in the Module Specification.

Optional Modules

Optional modules are selected using the Module Choice System (MOCS), logging in with your University username and password. It is important that you check the first page to ensure you have the correct programme and part listed. Module choice information is sent to new students via email around a month before the start of the programme. Returning students will choose their optional modules during the module choice window which runs in Semester 2 from the start of teaching week 10 to the end of teaching week 11.

When selecting your modules, please read all relevant module information and make sure you meet any prerequisites listed in the module specifications. Should you have any questions regarding this, please email your School Programme Administration team or the Module Leaders.

Students who are on a LOA will be contacted, at the appropriate time, directly by the School programme administration team to discuss module options.

A very limited number of modules are capped. The quota is generally filled on a first come, first served basis. The Module Choice System (MOCS) will alert students when module capacity has been reached and an alternative selection will need to be made. In some instances, specific criteria for prioritising allocation may apply if modules are over-subscribed.

If students find that their module selections are not suitable for them, the University allows some flexibility in the first two weeks of Semesters One and Two to make changes. These changes are judged on a case-by-case basis and subject to:

  • Ensuring there are no clashes on your timetable.
  • Capacity on the module (for instance, if teaching space limits apply).
  • Whether it will be feasible to catch up on any missed academic content.
  • Assessments which may already have been completed.

Module choice changes will not be deemed as grounds for mitigating circumstances, so you will need to be sure that the change is in your best interest. Please note that module choice changes after the first two weeks of the semester are not normally permitted.