Health communication and food labelling

We are testing creative and innovative ways of conveying information about food and drinks to the public.

Around 60% of the population are overweight which increases the risk of developing diseases and dying prematurely.

Our research is investigating simple ways in which food can be labelled to make it easier for people to select healthier options. We are most interested in the effects of physical activity calorie equivalent (PACE) labelling on the selection of food and drinks by the public.

Theme lead

Amanda Daley

Professor Amanda Daley

Professor of Behavioural Medicine, Centre Director

Research spotlight

2021

  • Daley AJ, Bleich SN. Should physical activity calorie equivalent (PACE) labelling be introduced on food labels and menus to reduce excessive calorie consumption? Issues and opportunities. Preventative Medicine December 2021 Volume 153, DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106813 

2020

  • Daley AJ, McGee E, Bayliss S, Coombe A, Parretti HM. Effects of physical activity calorie equivalent food labelling to reduce food selection and consumption: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled studies. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 2020;74:269-275. DOI: 10.1136/jech-2019-213216 

Recent news articles

PACE labelling and calorie intake

Videos, blogs and podcasts

PACE labelling and health

  • Social media and physical activity calorie equivalent labelling. Food Shoppers’ Social Media Study. Led by Alex Todd.
  • The acceptability and usefulness of physical activity calorie equivalent food labelling in young people. Funded by UKRI/ESRC. Led by Natalia Iris.
  • The effects of physical activity calorie equivalent (PACE) labelling on hot beverage transactions from vending machines: stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial (PACE-VEND). Funded by NIHR. Led by Tory Kettle and Amanda Daley.