School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Research

A multi-wavelength opto-electronic patch sensor (mOEPS) for the study of human thermoregulation and cutaneous microcirculation

A multi-wavelength opto-electronic patch sensor (mOEPS) for the study of human thermoregulation and cutaneous microcirculation

Continuous monitoring of multiple cardio-respiratory parameters is crucially important to evaluate physical conditions and activity levels in sports, as well as the right intensity in training.

Our Aim

Thermoregulation is critical for any athlete as maintaining a safe body temperature and avoiding hyperthermia/hypothermia is critical for optimum performance. This project studies the link between human thermoregulation and cutaneous microcirculation by analysing the correlation between the opto-physiological signal components and skin temperature by means of a multi-wavelength opto-electronic patch sensor (mOEPS) during physical activity. The mOEPS system is an advanced wearable device capable of monitoring real-time vital signs and physiological variations with individuals both at rest and during physical activities in healthcare, sport and fitness settings. 

Our Research

The main limitation of conventional photoplethysmogram (PPG) sensors is their susceptibility to body movement and physiological changes during physical activities, which results in inaccurate or faulty readings. In this study, we use a patented miniaturized and wearable mOEPS device, that has been constructed for the continuous measurement of blood volume changes in cutaneous vessels with signal processing algorithms that improve the reliability and accuracy of existing commercial PPG sensors. The system is ultra-light weight, unobtrusive and does not impede or restrict movement, so can therefore provide reliable signals that are motion resistant and adaptable to physiological changes due to thermoregulation over extended periods of time.  

The studies were conducted in collaboration with the National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine (NCSEM).

Our Outcomes

The project has delivered a patented multi-wavelength opto-electronic patch sensor (mOEPS) with a novel optical layout and bespoke signal processing algorithms capable of continuous and reliable monitoring of physiological signals even under high intensity physical activity.

Dr Sijung Hu - Reader in Biomedical Engineering

“We are quite excited about the performance of this ultra-lightweight sensor and the prospects of its commercialisation.” 

Dr Sijung Hu - Reader in Biomedical Engineering

Athena Swan Bronze award

Contact us

The Wolfson School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering
Loughborough University
Loughborough
Leicestershire
LE11 3TU