School of Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Research

Dynamic Deformation and Fracture of Advanced Materials Research Project

Dynamic Deformation and Fracture of Advanced Materials

Deformation, damage and fracture processes demonstrate specific features in materials loaded dynamically. MoAM undertakes a broad programme of research into dynamic deformation and fracture in collaboration with researchers in China, Russia and USA.

Our Aim

Dynamic collisions and fracture are among the most challenging and promising research fields. The endeavours to model these phenomena face many difficulties due to highly complicated physics and mathematics of related problems. The conventional quasi-static models of fracture mechanics do not allow explanations for various principal effects observed in experiments even in the simple cases of impacts and dynamic failure. Non-trivial spatio-temporal realisation of dynamic deformation and fracture processes are even more complex in microstructured materials, both artificial (composites) and natural (bones). In a case of fibre-reinforced laminates, Mechanics of Advanced Materials characterises and analyses a wide range of loading velocities – from low, characteristic to sports application, to high as in blast and impact loading, to hyper-velocities (typical for interaction of debris with satellites) – as well as types of projectiles. Other materials – and their combinations – are also studied.

The aim of the research is to elucidate the evolution of deformation, damage and fracture processes (and the underpinning mechanisms) in advanced materials exposed to dynamic loading.

Our Research

Mechanics of Advanced Materials undertakes a broad programme of research into dynamic deformation and fracture of a large spectrum of materials, using a combination of microstructural studies, experimental tests and advanced numerical simulations. The Group has in-house advanced dynamic loading facilities and uses facilities of its partners in various countries – Russia, USA and India.

Our Outcomes

This research will allow us to develop numerical tools capable to predict the mechanical response of various components and structures under conditions of blast and impact.

Professor Vadim Silberschmidt, Professor of Mechanics of Materials and Director of International Centre of Vibro-Impact Systems (ICoVIS)

“This challenging research will provide an insight into processes happening at short times and, usually, high loads, allowing design of impact- and blast-tolerant materials and products.”

Professor Vadim Silberschmidt, Professor of Mechanics of Materials and Director of International Centre of Vibro-Impact Systems (ICoVIS)