Juliet Stone headshot

Dr Juliet Stone

BA (Hons), MSc, PhD

  • Research Associate

I completed my doctoral research in 2009 at Imperial College, London where I investigated the measurement of life-course socioeconomic position and its relationship with health outcomes. I also hold an MSC in Social Research Methods with Statistics from City University, London and a BA in Media Studies from the University of Sussex.

In 2009 I joined the ESRC Centre for Population Change (CPC) as a Research Fellow, where my work involved quantitative analysis of large, cross-sectional and longitudinal datasets such as the Labour Force Survey, the English Survey of Housing, Understanding Society (the UK Household Longitudinal Study), and the General Household Survey. I worked on a variety of CPC projects including work on leaving and returning home in young adulthood in the UK and transitions to living alone in later life. I also investigated women’s economic activity over the life course as a predictor of health in later life and a project examining the role of economic uncertainty in predicting the fertility behaviour of men and women. During this period, I developed a particular interest in housing policy and the ways in which this can affect the choices and constraints people face in various aspects of their lives.

I joined CRSP in June 2018. My work is focussed mainly on quantitative analysis, including analysing data from the Family Resources Survey for the annual Households Below a Minimum Income Standard report. However, I have also been involved in aspects of the qualitative programme of work, including supporting the collection of focus group data for calculation of the  Minimum Income Standard for London

My research interests stem from a broad focus on understanding the consequences of differential socioeconomic circumstances from a life course perspective. More specifically, my interests include family and household dynamics; health inequalities and the social implications of housing policy. I also have an ongoing interest in longitudinal research methods.

Recent publications