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Talented Loughborough University Fine Art sculptors exhibit work on the international stage

Throughout April, fourteen Loughborough University students are showcasing their work as part of the ISC International Sculpture Day, 2015.

The annual event, which officially takes place on Friday 24 April, allows sculptors worldwide to gain recognition for their contribution to the arts.

Scheduled to have over 50 events across the globe, with representation in over 12 countries, this celebration of sculpture will have a projected audience of over 30,000 attendees.

Established in 2014, the International Sculpture Day program was founded to further the International Sculpture Center’s (ISC) mission of advancing the creation and understanding of sculpture and its impact on society.

A pop-up exhibition has been set up on campus at the Fine Art Gallery and displays the work of School of the Arts students. They include: 

  • Untitled by Olivia Muscat who explores the materiality of emulsion conveyed through the process of a pouring technique that employs gravity as its central tool.
  • On the rocks by Matteo Allodi who looks at the link between architecture and art in exploring similarities in use of line, shape and colour.
  • ‘Do you speak?’ by Marcos Alexandre Baioa Eliseu whose glazed stoneware head sculpture exploresthe practice of making ceramic head sculptures that translate figurative paintings.
  • Untitled (The Triptych) by Tamsin Corrigan whodepicts the process and interaction of clay, exploring the idea of the medium as a vivifier.
  • Work in progress by Amelia Seren Roberts who conveys howfragmented and distorted human figures often imply, paradoxically, both presence and absence of the individual.
  • Untitled by Georgina Fuller whose plaster on canvas explores the material of plaster, looking at its malleable form and texture.
  • The Boat de-wheeled by Craig Parr who explores the symbolisation of a boat within context.
  • Growth 2015 by Alexandra Brady who seeks to evoke senses beyond the visual in abstracted forms.
  • A Little Crêpe-y and Hard to Swallow and Rock Bottom by Rebecca Doms whose polymer clay sculptures translate the symptoms of depression into tactile physicality. 

Work from Josh Heathcote, Alex James, Olivia Callaghan, Hayley Roberts and Mar Ijsel Villegas is also on display.

John Atkin, Reader in Fine Art and University event organiser, said: “I am proud to have been invited to put together a concept for this global event. The ISC has a long history of supporting student practice and I have taken this opportunity to promote the work of several students on the Fine Art Programme, whose work articulates the ambitions of Sculpture within contemporary worldwide practice.

“The students involved in this exhibition contribute to the ethos of a making culture that utilises both cutting edge digital technologies as well as more traditional modes of practice: asserting themselves as independent thinkers within an ever expanding creative community.”