University LibraryStudents

Subject guides

Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Louise Fletcher

Photo of  Louise Fletcher

Academic Librarian

This guide aims to provide you with information about the Library’s resources and services relevant to Sports, Exercise and Health Sciences.

Use the tabs above to find information about:

  • journals and databases
  • referencing

Before you start remember to download the VPN from IT Services to gain seamless off-campus access to ebooks, e-journals, databases, e-mail and print credits etc.

If this guide does not provide you with the information that you need then please contact your Academic Librarian.

Search engines for Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Medline  contains journal citations and abstracts for biomedical literature from around the world.

NICE  (National Institute for Health & Care Excellence) Evidence search provides access to selected & authoritative evidence in health, social care & public health.

PubMed   A free resource developed and maintained by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) at the National Library of Medicine® (NLM).

Science Direct  Search for peer-reviewed journals, articles and book chapters. This resource covers a wide range of articles on Life Sciences & Health Sciences.

SCOPUS  Interdisciplinary scientific data and literature from around the world.

SPORTDiscus  This bibliographic database covers key areas of sports medicine and related fields. Content areas range from sports physiology and sports psychology to physical education and recreation.

Web of Science  Covers a variety of disciplines including Sport Science, pharmacology, medicine, biology.

Tip: Some of the abstract only databases will provide SFX links   .  When you see the SFX symbol click on it and then select the   icon to access the full text where available.

E-journals can be viewed on any computer whether you are in the Library or working from home off campus.  Just remember to download the VPN for off campus access.


                  

 

Referencing & Citation

When you refer to another person’s work in your own essay, report or presentation etc, you will need to reference that work to avoid plagiarising it.  This allows the person reading your work to differentiate between your ideas and those of another person.  You can reference the work in two ways:

  • Citation, also called an in-text citation.  This accompanies the quote, extract, paraphrasing or illustration that you have used and provides the name of the author/creator, date and page numbers if relevant. For example:

‘Recent research (Baker and Gale, 2015, pp. 201-203) challenges previous theories…..’

  •  Bibliography, provides the details of all the sources which you have consulted during your research.  If you are referencing a printed book you will need to include the following details: author/editor; publication year; title; edition if not the first; place of publication; series and volume number where relevant. For example:

Baker, G.H., and Gale, F. (2015) Cloud computing. 2nd edn. London: Routledge.

An advice sheet on citing and referencing using the Harvard style can be found at this link.

An excellent guide to referencing which mainly includes Harvard examples is called ‘Cite them Right: the essential referencing guide’ , this is available online and also in book form in the library, shelf mark 808.027/PEA. It gives you examples of how to reference various resources such as:

  • web pages with no authors or titles, etc
    • ebooks
    • blogs,
    • wikis and social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter
    • computer games or programs
    • legal cases
    • packaging
    • podcasts, phonecasts, screencasts or vodcasts/vidcasts.

Reference management software

Reference management software can help you to keep track of all the references you have used in your reports, essays or final project. The library provides guidance on Mendeley referencing software (free).

However, there are other types of reference management tools available such as ColWiz and Zotero.  To help you choose which one is the best for you see the Bodleian Libraries’ comparison tool.