Team members

Meet the team below...

Vicky Tolfrey

Prof Vicky Tolfrey

Centre Director, Sport Performance strand leader, Professor in Applied Disability Sport

Vicky Tolfrey joined the PHC as the Director in late 2007 and she also leads the Research Strand on Sport Performance‌. She is a Professor in Applied Disability Sport in the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences at Loughborough University.

Qualifications

  • PhD entitled 'Pushing economy and wheelchair propulsion technique of wheelchair racers', Manchester Metropolitan University (1999).
  • BSc (Hons) in Sport Science, Manchester Metropolitan University (1993). Awarded the Exercise and Sport Science Department prize for best all-round Sport Scientist.

Membership and involvement with professional bodies / associations

Vicky is a re-accredited physiologist and interdisciplinary sport scientist with the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) and a BASES Fellow. She received the award for ‘Outstanding Contributions to Applied Practice’ at the BASES 2005 Annual Conference, which recognises Vicky’s work in supporting athletes at Paralympic level.

Staff profile

Christof Leicht

Dr Christof Leicht

Senior Lecturer, Health and Wellbeing strand leader

Christof Leicht joined Loughborough University in 2009, having gained experience in spinal cord injury and disability sport in the highly respected Swiss Paraplegic Centre. He completed his PhD in the Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport (PHC) in the following years, graduating in December 2012.  His main research focus was to investigate the impacts of a spinal cord injury and autonomic dysfunction on exercise physiology and exercise immunology. Christof’s current projects in the area of exercise immunology still include spinal cord injury research and, more generally, are aimed at populations with reduced muscle mass or function, such as rehabilitation and patient populations. Christof was promoted to the post of Lecturer in Exercise Physiology in August 2014 and leads the Health and Wellbeing Strand of the PHC.

Qualifications

  • PhD in exercise physiology. Title: Mucosal immune and physiological responses to exercise in wheelchair athletes. Loughborough University, 2012
  • MSc in Sports and Exercise Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, Switzerland (2004).
  • BSc in Biology, University of Berne, Switzerland (2001).

Staff profile

Barry Mason

Dr Barry Mason

Senior Research Associate in Sport Performance

Barry Mason was appointed the position of PHC Research Associate for the Sport Science Research Strand in February 2011. Barry is an interdisciplinary sport scientist whose research interests cover biomechanical and physiological aspects of Paralympic sports of which he has worked with for over 10 years. His current interests include the optimisation of sports performance in the wheelchair court sports either through manipulating aspects of the athletes equipment or by enhancing training strategies through the use of an indoor tracking system. Barry is also interested in developing evidence-based classification systems in Paralympic sports such as wheelchair rugby. One final area that Barry is currently exploring is directed more towards the health and wellbeing of the athletes he works with and is designed to understand more about the development and prevention of shoulder pain in this population.

Qualifications

  • PhD titled 'The ergonomics of wheelchair configuration for optimal sport performance.' From Loughborough University in 2011.
  • MSc (Distinction) in Sport & Exercise Biomechanics from the University of Chichester in 2005.
  • BSc (Hons) in Sport & Exercise Science from The University of Chichester in 2004.

Staff profile

Anthony Papathomas

Dr Anthony Papathomas

Senior Lecturer, Sport and Exercise Psychology

Anthony completed his first degree in Sports Science at Liverpool John Moores University, graduating with First Class Honours. He went on to complete a postgraduate certificate of education (PGCE) at the University of Greenwich in 2004 and a year later attained a Masters degree in Sport and Exercise Psychology (with Distinction) from Loughborough University. Anthony also conducted his doctoral studies at Loughborough University and graduated with a PhD in 2011. Having briefly left Loughborough to be Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology at London Metropolitan University, he has since returned to join the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Sciences as Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology.

Qualifications

  • PhD entitled 'Disordered Eating in Sport: Narrative's Turn', from Loughborough University in 2011.
  • MSc in Sport and Exercise Psychology (with Distinction) from Loughborough University in 2004.
  • BSc in Sports Science (First Class) from Liverpool John Moores University in 2000.

Membership and involvement with professional bodies / associations

Anthony leads the Mental Health Strand for the Psychology Division of the British Association for Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES).

Staff profile

Other Staff

Dr Sven Hoekstra

Research Associate in Health and Wellbeing

After completing his PhD at Loughborough University on the efficacy of low-cost interventions to reduce chronic low-grade inflammation in people with a disability, Sven took on a Postdoctoral post within the Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport. During that year he investigated appetite regulation in people with a spinal cord injury and strategies to enhance the tolerability of passive heating protocols. Thereafter, he spent six months at Wakayama Medical University to investigate the effects of exercise on chronic pain in an obesity mouse model.

Qualifications

  • MSc Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, Groningen
  • BSc Health and Life Sciences, VU University, Amsterdam
  • PhD, Loughborough University (2019), “Strategies to induce an inflammatory response; a focus on alternatives for people restricted from engaging in lower-body exercise”

Current research interests:

In his current position, Sven hopes to contribute to the implementation of exercise and physical activity interventions in rehabilitation settings and further his research into passive heating as a treatment tool as well as metabolic health in people with a spinal cord injury.

Staff profile

Dr Michael Hutchinson

Research Associate

Michael joined the team in December 2014 as a Research Assistant and Laboratory Technician, whilst also completing a part-time PhD. Since finishing his PhD he has continued as a Research Associate in Sport Performance.

Qualifications

  • PhD, Loughborough University (2019), entitled “The application of subjective Ratings of Perceived Exertion to regulate exercise intensity during upper body exercise”. 

Current research interests:

Through his role as Research Associate, Michael aids in many physiology and classification research projects in the Sport Performance strand. Michael is currently working with the International Tennis Federation and researchers from University of Queensland on developing evidence-based classification in Wheelchair Tennis. Michael is also continuing with research that follows on from his PhD studies.

Michael’s PhD focused on the application of subjective ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) to regulate exercise intensity during upper body exercise. Michael conducted studies into the validity and reliability of using RPE-guided exercise for both exercise testing and exercise prescription in able-bodied and disabled participants. Michael is also interested in understanding what mechanisms contribute to the RPE response, and how these mechanisms may impact on RPE responses in participants with a disability, such as spinal cord injury.

 

Staff profile

 

 

Thomas O'Brien

Sports Science Assistant to Wheelchair Rugby, PHC Information Officer and part-time PhD student in Sport Performance

Tom was appointed the position of PHC Research assistant for the Sports performance strand in October 2017. He will also be completing a part-time PhD alongside his Research Assistant role. Tom also provides sport science support for GB Wheelchair rugby across both the elite and talent pathways, as part of the PHC’s ongoing support to the sport. This includes athlete screening and fitness profiling in both the laboratory and field based setting. 

Qualifications

  • MSc in Exercise Physiology, Loughborough University (2017)
  • BSc (Hons) in Sport and Exercise Science, Aberystwyth University (2016)

Membership and involvement with professional bodies:

  • Tom is a member of the British Associations of Sport and Exercise Sciences. 

Current Research Interests:

Tom is interested in the research area of thermoregulation and warm-up where his previous researh topics focussed on this area. As part of his role within the PHC, Tom aids in many different research projects that are ongoing, however his main research interests lie within his PhD studies. His PhD is supervised by Prof. Vicky Tolfrey and Dr. Christof Leicht and comes under the sports performance strand of the PHC.

Tom’s PhD focusses on optimising training strategies for Wheelchair Rugby players, where he is keen to expand on his MSc work around the area of Warm-up and thermoregulation. Tom will be working closely with the GB wheelchair rugby team to identify methods of optimising performance through warm-up and cooling strategies.

Staff profile

Dr Ben Stephenson

Research Assistant in Sports Performance

Ben joined the PHC in 2015 as a PhD student, jointly funded by the British Triathlon Federation. As of 2018, he will be working as a part-time Research Assistant.

Qualifications

  • BSc Sport and Exercise Science, Loughborough University (2014)
  • MSc Exercise Physiology, Loughborough University (2015)

Membership and involvement with professional bodies / associations

Ben is a member of BASES. 

Current research interests:

Ben is currently researching the thermoregulatory strain of competition in Paralympic athletes via a project jointly funded by the English Institute of Sport. Additionally, acute and chronic alleviative strategies are being explored to ameliorate athletes’ thermal strain.

Staff profile

Dr Jamie Barker

Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology 

Jamie graduated with a BSc degree in Sport Studies (1998) and an MSc in Sport, Health and Exercise Science (2000) both from Staffordshire University. In 2008, he completed his PhD entitled “Using Hypnosis to Enhance Sport Performers Self-Efficacy” also at Staffordshire University which was supervised by Professor Marc Jones, Dr Iain Greenlees and Professor Tom Cochrane. Jamie has had lecturing positions in Sport and Exercise Psychology at both Edge Hill University and Staffordshire University. Whilst at Staffordshire he became Senior Lecturer in Sport and Exercise Psychology in 2007 and then Associate Professor of Applied Sport and Performance Psychology in 2013 before joining Loughborough University in 2017.

Qualifications

BSc Sports Studies, Staffordshire University (1998)

MSc Sport, Exercise and Health Science, Staffordshire University (2000)

PhD entitled "Using Hypnosis to Enhance Sport Performers Self-Efficacy", Staffordshire University (2008)

Membership and involvement with professional bodies / associations

  • Member Disability Football Performance Group (The Football Association)
  • Committee Member of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology (DSEP)
  • Committee Member of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology Training Committee (DSEPTC)
  • Member of the British Psychological Society Board for the Qualification in Sport and Exercise Psychology (QSEP)
  • Member Editorial Board, The International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology
  • Member, Editorial Board, The Sport Psychologist
  • Member, Editorial Board, Sport and Exercise Psychology Review

External positions

  • Chair of the Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology (DSEP; 2015-2017)
  • Associate Editor, Journal of Applied Sport Psychology
  • Co-Guest Editor (Sport and Performance Psychology Special Issue), Journal of Change Management (2016)
  • Guest Editor (Single-Case Research Methods in Sport and Exercise Psychology Special Issue), Journal of Applied Sport Psychology (2013)
  • External Examiner (2018-): MSc Sport and Exercise Psychology, University of Ulster
  • External Examiner (2018-): Professional Doctorate in Sport and Exercise Psychology, Glasgow Caledonian University.

Current research interests:

Jamie’s main research interest is centred on applied (sport and performance) psychology research and is based around three key themes: intervention effectiveness (including applied research methods), group dynamics and leadership, and resilience. Jamie’s has specific interests in Hypnosis, Rational-Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT), Personal-Disclosure Mutual-Sharing (PDMS), Resilience (Challenge and Threat states), Social Identity (Group Dynamics and Leadership), Single-Case Research Methods, and the Psychological Characteristics of Elite Disability sport.

Staff profile

Dr Janine Coates

Lecturer in Qualitative Research Methods

Janine Coates joined the PHC after taking up a post as Lecturer in Qualitative Research Methods for the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences at Loughborough University in September 2016.

Qualifications

  • PhD entitled “Let the children have their say: Experiences of children with special education needs in Physical Education” (2010)
  • BSc Psychology and Criminology at Sheffield Hallam University

Membership and involvement with professional bodies / associations

Janine is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy and a member of the British Educational Research Association.

External positions

Since 2010, Janine has acted as an Honorary Consultant for Think Children, a Nottinghamshire-based children’s charity that provide play-based interventions to primary school children with emerging social, emotional and behavioural needs.

Current research interests:

Janine’s research employs qualitative methods to better understand the sport and physical activity experiences of children with disabilities, with a particular focus on school settings. More broadly, through engagement with children about their lived experience, her work considers the how inclusive practices for children with disabilities might develop.  Janine has a particular interest in the use of novel methods for engaging children with disabilities in research.
Some of her previous work has considered children with disabilities perceptions about the Paralympic Games, children’s experiences of physical education, inclusive teacher education and behavioural interventions for children with ADHD.

Staff profile

Dr Keith Tolfrey

Reader in Paediatric Exercise Physiology and PHC Statistical Advisor
Keith Tolfrey

After completing his undergraduate teaching degree in Physical Education and Mathematics at the University of Exeter (Eric Sparrow Memorial Award for Outstanding Student 1989) Keith taught secondary school P.E.

His first position in higher education was as a Tutor at the University of Exeter whilst completing an MPhil (Paediatric Exercise Physiology 1993) under the expert supervision of Professor Neil Armstrong. Keith then spent two years at the College of St. Mark and John in Plymouth teaching a variety of practical and theoretical disciplines, but focusing predominantly on Exercise Physiology. A move to the Manchester Metropolitan University as a lecturer in 1994 allowed him to complete his PhD (Paediatric Exercise Physiology 1998) under the expert supervision of Professor Ian Campbell.

Keith came to the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences (September 2007) as a senior lecturer to join the vibrant and internationally reknowned team of exercise physiologists. In 2011 Keith was awarded a BASES Fellowship for his work with children and adolescents and significant long-standing contribution to Sport and Exercise Science. In 2013, Keith became a Reader in Paediatric Exercise Physiology.

Current research interests:

Keith’s primary research interests relate to health in young people (children and adolescents) and how this might be influenced by either structured exercise training or participation in regular physical activity.

Some of his work has focused on physiological determinants of endurance performance such as maximal lactate steady state, economy, and peak oxygen uptake in young people. He has, however, also collaborated on various projects focusing on wheelchair sports performance and oxygen uptake kinetics.

Current research interests include fat metabolism, postprandial lipaemia, and estimation of energy expenditure in physical activity in young people. From the teaching and learning perspective Keith enjoys working with students on most aspects of exercise physiology, but also has a keen interest in research methods and quantitative statistics.

Staff profile

Dr Laura-Anne Furlong

Lecturer in Biomechanics

Laura-Anne was awarded a first class honours degree in Sport and Exercise Sciences by the University of Limerick, Ireland in 2009. During this time she completed an 8 month placement working as a Research Assistant with the Sports Biomechanics Research Group at Cardiff Metropolitan University.

She graduated with her PhD in 2014, also from the University of Limerick. This research focused on the assessment of plantarflexor muscle function during stretch-shortening cycle tasks and was funded by the Irish Research Council. During this time, she provided sport science and sports medicine support to the Irish Hockey Association and worked as a Lecturer in Performance Analysis at University of Limerick.

Laura-Anne joined the School in August 2014 as a Research Associate in Impact Biomechanics as part of the Institute for Sports Research collaboration with Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. She was appointed as a Vice Chancellor’s Lecturer in Biomechanics in December 2015.

Current research interests:

Controlled, coordinated movement occurs due to multiple complex interactions between factors such as muscle size, strength and activation. Establishing the relationships between these factors is fundamental in understanding the aetiology of injury, development of optimal rehabilitation programmes, and biologically inspired engineering design. By combining non-invasive in vivo measures of muscle and tendon structure and function during dynamic activities with biomechanical analyses of movement, force and coordination, Laura-Anne’s research aims to establish how modifications in neuromuscular parameters influence observed outcomes and coordination in dynamic activities such as walking, running and jumping, which has significant implications for long-term musculoskeletal health. Current clinical collaborators include the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in the area of amputee rehabilitation. 

Staff profile

Dr Carolyn Plateau

Lecturer in Psychology

Carolyn completed her undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford in 2009.  She obtained her MRes (Distinction, 2010) and PhD (2015) from Loughborough University. Her PhD research focused on optimising the identification and management of disordered eating among athletic populations.

Carolyn joined SSEHS as an Assistant Lecturer in Psychology in 2013 and was appointed as a Lecturer in Psychology in June 2015. 

Current research interests:

Carolyn’s research interests are focused around understanding the risks and consequences of mental health issues among athletes, with a specific focus on disordered eating and exercise. Carolyn is particularly interested in the role of key stakeholders (e.g., coaches, sports professionals, teammates, peers, parents, teachers) in the prevention and early identification of eating problems. Currently, she is collaborating with clinical colleagues on the development and evaluation of effective and scalable interventions to prevent and reduce disordered eating and exercise among athletes, students and exercising populations. Carolyn’s research has an applied focus and has led to the development of new screening tools, educational materials and resources to support sports professionals in the prevention, identification and management of disordered eating amongst athletes. For example, Carolyn has recently developed an evidence-based online educational programmefor coaches and sports professionals, to support the early identification and management of athletes with disordered eating. 

 

Staff profile

Dr Emma Pullen

Lecturer in Sport Management

Emma completed her PhD at Loughborough University in 2016 and her postdoctoral research in 2019 before joining Loughborough University SSEHS as a lecturer in Sport Management. 

Current research interests:

Emma’s research interests are broadly focussed on disability representation, disability and gender, and Paralympic broadcast and media narratives. Her work in this area has engaged with media production practices in Paralympic sport, shifting representations of Para-athletes, and the impact and role of Paralympic media on attitudes toward, and understandings of, disability and cultural stigma. Emma’s work has engaged with media practitioners such as Channel 4 (C4), sport governing bodies and disability charities.

 

Staff profile

Han Newman

Research Associate

Han was appointed in January 2020 to lead the ‘Promoting Physical Activity in Thalidomide Survivors’ research project for the Health and Wellbeing strand. Han was previously based in the School of Social Sciences at Loughborough, completing their PhD entitled: ‘Becoming a Strongwoman: An auto/ethnographic study of the pursuit of strength and power, and the negotiation of gender aesthetics in the UK Strongwoman community’.

Qualifications:

MSc Psychology of Sport and Exercise, Loughborough University (2015)

MSc Psychology, Middlesex University (2014)

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science, Middlesex University (2013)

Current research interests:

Han is currently working with Dr Anthony Papathomas and Dr Christof Leicht on a project exploring physical activity engagement in Thalidomide survivors. This project is being run in collaboration with The Thalidomide Trust.

Han’s research interests sit at the nexus between sport, gender, and inclusion. Whilst much of Han’s research to date has been focused on gender in sport, their interests are in inclusivity in sport, and the promotion of sport, exercise, and physical activity in marginalised populations, more broadly.

Staff profile

PhD Students

Thomas O'Brien - PhD student in Sports Performance

Sports Science Assistant to Wheelchair Rugby, PHC Information Officer and part-time PhD student in Sport Performance

Tom was appointed the position of PHC Research assistant for the Sports performance strand in October 2017. He will also be completing a part-time PhD alongside his Research Assistant role. Tom also provides physiological support for the GB Wheelchair rugby team as part of the PHC’s ongoing support to the sport. This includes athlete screening and fitness profiling for both elite and talent pathways players.

Qualifications

  • MSc in Exercise Physiology, Loughborough University (2017)
  • BSc (Hons) in Sport and Exercise Science, Aberystwyth University (2016)

Membership and involvement with professional bodies:

  • Tom is a member of the British Associations of Sport and Exercise Sciences. 

Current Research Interests:

Tom is interested in the research area of warm-up where his BSc and MSc research projects both focussed around this topic area. As part of his role within the PHC, Tom aids in many different research projects that are ongoing, however his main research interests lie within his PhD studies. His PhD is supervised by Prof. Vicky Tolfrey and Dr. Christof Leicht and comes under the sports performance strand of the PHC.

Tom’s PhD focusses on optimising training strategies for Wheelchair Rugby players, where he is keen to expand on his MSc work around the area of Warm-up. Tom will be working closely with the GB wheelchair rugby team to identify methods of optimising performance.

Staff profile

Conor Murphy - PhD student in Sports Performance

PhD student in Sport Performance

Conor completed his BA in Physiology at Trinity College Dublin. From there he went on to specialise in sport and exercise, the main area his interests lay, by completing an MSc in Exercise Physiology at Loughborough University. He then went on to take his current role as a PhD student in 2018. 

Qualifications

  • MSc in Exercise Physiology, Loughborough University (2017) 
  • BA Physiology, Trinity College Dublin (2016)

Current Research 

Conor's research will be done working closely with the Peter Harrison Centre and Great Britain Wheelchair Rugby. His PhD will be mainly focused on researching recovery interventions associated with Paralympic sports, in particular sleep strategies in persons with spinal cord injury. 

Student profile

Simon Briley - PhD student in Health and Wellbeing

Simon is a PhD student at the PHC, under the supervision of Dr Barry Mason, Dr Riemer Vegter (University of Groningen) and Prof Vicky Tolfrey.

Qualifications

  • BSc (Hons) Sports Strength and Conditioning – University of Gloucestershire

  • MSc Sports Biomechanics – Loughborough University

Current Research Interests

In October 2017, Simon commenced his PhD with the Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport (PHC) at Loughborough University. With his PhD topic exploring the link between movement asymmetry and shoulder pain in wheelchair athletes.

Project title: Exploring bilateral shoulder load, propulsion asymmetries and their relationship with pain and injuries in wheelchair athletes.

Simon’s project will cover the following aims:

  • Quantify the magnitude of asymmetry present in a wheelchair athlete population during wheelchair propulsion.
  • Explore the link between the magnitude of asymmetry and the presence and severity of shoulder pain in wheelchair athletes.
  • Explore risk factors associated with asymmetry and shoulder pain.

 Staff profile

Cristina D'Angeli - PhD student in Sports Performance

Cristina is a PhD student at the PHC, under the supervision of Prof Vicky Tolfrey, Dr Mark King and Dr Barry Mason, partially funded by the The Tennis Foundation.

Qualifications

  • MSc in Biomedical Engineering, Polytechnic of Milan, Milano (Italy) (2017)
  • BSc in Biomedical Engineering, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy) (2015)

Current research interests

In January 2018, Cristina commenced her PhD with the Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport (PHC) at Loughborough University. The aim of her project is to give applied biomechanical support to wheelchair tennis. The findings will help to inform guidelines on wheelchair tennis coaching and player development to improve performance and minimise injury risk.

Cristina’s PhD covers several areas of research including:

• Establishing the key technical principles of the tennis serve for wheelchair tennis players from both a performance and injury perspective

• Exploring the chair ergonomics/propulsion technique and technological developments to maximise on court athlete performance.

Lesley Sharpe - PhD student in Health and Wellbeing

Lesley joined Loughborough as a PhD student in the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences in October 2017, under the supervision of Dr Janine Coates and Dr David Howe.

Qualifications

BA (First Class with Honours) in Sports Education and Special and Inclusive Education from Nottingham Trent University 2017. 

Current Research

Lesley’s current research centres on exploring inclusive sport at the School Games, and the pathways in which children and young people with disabilities come to participate in competitive sport. The project aims to investigate the role and impact that Project Ability schools have in facilitating such participation and additionally explore children and young people with disabilities perceptions of the School Games and participating in competitive sport.

Lesley’s undergraduate dissertation focused on how learners with an Autism Spectrum Disorder experienced Physical Education. 

Staff profile

Jordan Fenton - PhD student in Health and Wellbeing

Jordan joined the PHC and the school of sport, exercise and health sciences at Loughborough University as a PhD student, under the supervision of Prof Vicky Tolfrey and Dr James King.

Qualifications

  • BSc Sport and Exercise Science – University of Essex
  • MSc Sport and Exercise Nutrition – Loughborough University

 

Current Research Interests

Continuing from his 2019 MSc research project, Jordan began his PhD in January 2020 with the Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport at Loughborough University. His research began by investigating appetite regulation in spinal cord injury (SCI) populations.

Project title: Energy Intake Regulation in Individuals with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

Jordan’s PhD looks to explore:

  • Whether individuals with SCI are able to autonomously compensate for energy intake following varying energy preloads.
  • If autonomic dysfunction negatively impacts the regulation of hormones involved in energy intake regulation. 
  • Whether subjective feelings of hunger and satiety are concordant with peripheral measures.

Visiting Fellows

Prof Lucas van der Woude - Visiting Professor at the PHC, Professor in Human Movement, Rehabilitation and Functional Recovery at the Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen

Prof Kathleen Martin Ginis - Visiting Professor to the PHC, Professor in the School of Health and Exercise Science at University British Columbia

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Staff Profile

Prof Maureen MacDonald - Visiting Professor to PHC, Department of Kinesiology, Director School of Interdisciplinary Science, McMaster University

Prof Nick Webborn - Clinical Prof-Sport and Exercise Medicine, School of Sport and Service Management, Sport and Exercise Science and Sports Medicine Research and Enterprise Group, University of Brighton

Staff Profile

Dr Viola Altmann - Visiting Fellow in Rehabilitation Sciences within the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences at Loughborough University

Dr Riemer Vegter - Visiting Fellow in Rehabilitation Sciences at PHC, Assistant professor Human Movement Sciences, University Groningen

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Staff Profile

Dr Jan van der Scheer - Visiting fellow at PHC, Research Associate

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Staff Profile