School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Staff

Dr Stephen Mears PhD

Photo of Dr Stephen Mears

Lecturer in Sports & Exercise Nutrition

Stephen gained his undergraduate degree in 2008 at the University of Bath in Sport and Exercise Science. He completed a placement year as part of the degree working at the British Olympic Medical Institute and studying at the University of Wollongong in Australia. Stephen completed his PhD at Loughborough University in 2012 examining fluid intake behaviours in the workplace and following high intensity exercise. Following his PhD Stephen worked for Powerade as a Sports Scientist at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. He then returned to Loughborough first as a technician and then to work on a project examining medical care at endurance events around the world.

Stephen is a middle distance runner competing for Charnwood AC and Harrow AC over 800m and 1500m. He is yet to step up to the marathon but is tempted to start soon after the visits to the Marathon Majors during 2014. He is also a keen tennis player, golfer and skier (and sometimes cyclist).

Stephen’s research areas of interest include fluid balance during and following exercise, specifically hyponatremia and how that relates to endurance exercise. He is interested in examining medical care, provisions and set ups at endurance events with focus on management and treatment of common endurance race conditions. He sits on the Research Board of the International Institute for Race Medicine.

Invited reviewer for:

  • Journal of Sports Sciences
  • International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
  • European Journal of Sport Science

 Conference presentations:

  • Mears, S.A., Bee, G., Williams, D.W. & Watson, P. (2015). Validation of a point of care analyser during a simulated run protocol. ACSM Annual Meeting, San Diego, USA. (Poster
  • Mears, S.A., Watson, P. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2013). The effect on serum osmolality following high intensity intermittent exercise when access to ad libitum water intake was permitted, not permitted or delayed, ISENC, Newcastle (Poster)
  • Mears, S.A. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2012). The effects of high intensity intermittent exercise compared to continuous exercise on voluntary water ingestion, ICSEMIS, Glasgow (Oral communication)
  • Mears, S.A. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2011). Voluntary fluid intake in the cold, International Sports Science and Sports Medicine Conference, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (Oral communication).
  • Mears, S.A. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2011). The effect of high intensity intermittent exercise compared to continuous exercise on voluntary water ingestion, Progress report, European Hydration Institute Network Meeting, London (Oral Communication).
  • Mears, S.A. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2010). Assessing hydration status in the work place, Hydration and Health Conference, British Nutrition Foundation, (Oral communication)
  • Mears, S.A., Watson, P. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2016). The effect on serum osmolality following high intensity intermittent exercise when access to ad libitum water intake was permitted, not permitted or delayed. Physiology & Behavior, 157, 47-54.
  • James, L.J., Mears, S.A. and Shirreffs, S.M. (2015). Effect of electrolyte supplementation during severe energy restriction on exercise capacity in the heat. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 115, 2621-2629.
  • Watson, P., Whale, A., Mears, S.A., Reyner, L.A. & Maughan, R.J. (2015). Mild hypohydration increases the frequency of driver errors during a prolonged, monotonous driving task. Physiology & Behavior, 147, 313-318.
  • Mears, S.A. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2015). Assessing hydration status and reported beverage intake in the workplace. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 9(2), 157-168.
  • Mears, S.A. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2014). Voluntary water intake during and following moderate exercise in the cold. International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 24(1), 47-58.
  • Mears, S.A. & Shirreffs, S.M. (2013). The effects of high intensity intermittent exercise compared with continuous exercise on voluntary water ingestion. International Journal of Sports Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 23(5), 488-497.