Kinga Morsanyi

  • Senior Lecturer in Mathematical Cognition

I completed a BSc in Psychology and an MSc in Cognitive Neuropsychology at the Lorand Eotvos University in Hungary. I obtained my PhD in Experimental/Developmental Psychology at the University of Plymouth in 2010. My PhD project concerned the development of reasoning heuristics in autism and in typical development. During my PhD, I also worked as a Teaching and Research Associate at the University of Plymouth. Following my PhD, I obtained a post-doctoral position at the University of Geneva, and worked on a project concerning the development of conditional reasoning skills. Subsequently, I was awarded an ESRC post-doctoral fellowship and moved to the University of Cambridge. My project investigated the reasoning skills of children with developmental dyscalculia and children with exceptional mathematics skills. Before taking up my current post in July 2020, I worked as a Lecturer in Psychology at Queen’s University Belfast.

My research concerns the development of mathematical abilities and mathematics anxiety, and the contribution of reasoning skills to mathematics performance. I am also interested in how affective and motivational states influence maths and reasoning abilities, as well as people’s decisions, and how maths and reasoning skills can be improved by training. I also have a background in the development of reasoning skills in typical development and in special populations (in developmental dyscalculia and autism). I am particularly interested in reasoning heuristics, probabilistic reasoning and analogical reasoning. I am also interested in psychological measurement. My work has been funded by grants from the ESRC, the Nuffield Foundation, the Royal Society, the British Academy, and the Higher Education Academy Psychology Network. As a student, I received study visit grants from the Experimental Psychology Society and the Action Austria-Hungary Fund. I also received an outstanding student paper award from the Cognitive Science Society.

  • You can find a public report of my Nuffield Foundation-funded project on dyscalculia here.
  • Check out my google scholar profile for a list of publications.
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