Sportfor a Better World?

Hundreds of programmes and organizations

SDP programmes have very diverse objectives and scales; the largest initiatives are transnational, involve multiple agencies, and usually aim to meet basic human needs, for example peace in war-torn regions.

Diverse objectives and scales

SDP programmes have very diverse objectives and scales; the largest initiatives are transnational, involve multiple agencies, and usually aim to meet basic human needs, for example peace in war-torn regions.

Hundreds of programmes and organizations

SDP programmes have very diverse objectives and scales; the largest initiatives are transnational, involve multiple agencies, and usually aim to meet basic human needs, for example peace in war-torn regions.

Diverse objectives and scales

SDP programmes have very diverse objectives and scales; the largest initiatives are transnational, involve multiple agencies, and usually aim to meet basic human needs, for example peace in war-torn regions.

Sport for a Better World?

A Social Scientific Investigation of the sport for development and peace sector

This project will investigate the Sport for Development and Peace (SDP) Sector in five developing countries; Kosovo, Jamaica, Sri Lanka, Rwanda and Zambia.

SDP features hundreds of programmes and organizations across the world which use sport as a tool of intervention to promote non-sport goals such as development, peace, human rights and social justice. SDP programmes have very diverse objectives and scales; the largest initiatives are transnational, involve multiple agencies, and usually aim to meet basic human needs, for example peace in war-torn regions.

Despite its rapid growth, we have limited knowledge of how the SDP is structured socially and organizationally; and how different kinds of SDP work are planned, implemented and experienced in diverse cultural contexts. This knowledge is essential if robust policies, practices and strategies for the future development of SDP are to be identified.

This project aims to fill that knowledge gap by providing the first substantial comparative investigation of SDP, and by having long-term impact on the sector’s development.

Researchers

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His research has been funded through grant awards from the UK Economic and Social Research Council (6 awards), European Commission, and the Nuffield Foundation.  He is author of the books Football: A Sociology of the Global Game (Polity 1999); Sport: A Critical Sociology (Polity 2005); Ethics, Money and Sport (with Adrian Walsh; Routledge 2007); and, Globalization and Football (with Roland Robertson; Sage 2009).

He has edited many books, including Sport, Civil Liberties and Human Rights (with David McArdle; Routledge, 2006), and written numerous papers for international journals and edited books. His work has been translated and published in eleven languages.

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He has also conducted research into Cuba’s sport-based internationalism, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. He is the author of Sport for Development and Peace: A Critical Sociology and co-author of Sport and Social Movements: From the Global to the Local (both with Bloomsbury Academic Press).

His work has also been published in various academic journals, including The Sociology of Sport Journal, The International Journal of Sport Policy and Politics, and Development in Practice.

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Her main research interests are urban youth, post-conflict peacebuilding and rehabilitation, development studies and social anthropology.

She has published work including: ‘Meta-Societies’ and ‘Play Communities’ The Function of Play to Liberian Youth Football Players (Cadernos de Estudos Africanos, 26, 2013); A Game for the Good?: Football, youths and the Liberian Civil Conflict (African Research and Documentation: Special Issue:116); Design for Living? Sporting Policy and the United Nations (with Gary Armstrong; Gower 2011).

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David holds a visiting professorship at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium and an adjunct Professorship at Queen’s University, Canada. Trained as a medical anthropologist, he is the author of Sport, Professionalism and Pain: Ethnographies of Injury and Risk (Routledge, 2004) and The Cultural Politics of the Paralympic Movement: Through the Anthropological Lens (Routledge, 2008).

Research Liaison Group:

UK Sport

Robert Morini – Head of International Development

Street Football World

Catherine Daraspe

Commonwealth Secretariat

Malcolm Dingwall-Smith – Programme Officer: Youth Affairs Division

Durham University

Iain Lindsey

UNOSDP

Jonas Burgheim

Sport for Development Platform

Jutta Engelhardt – Director of Programming

University of California, Berkeley

Martha Saavedra

In partnership with: