School of Business and Economics

Our staff

Dr Ray Randall BSc (Hons) Reading; MSc, PhD Nottingham

Photo of Dr Ray Randall

Senior Lecturer in Organisational Behaviour and Human Resource Management

Head of Discipline, Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour

Dr. Ray Randall is a HCPC Registered Occupational Psychologist. He is a Full Member of the Division of Occupational Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS) and Chartered Psychologist.

He is Head of the School’s Human Resource Management and Organisational Behaviour Discipline Group. Before taking on this role he developed, and was Programme Director for, the School’s MSc Work Psychology (accredited by the BPS) and MSc Business Psychology (accredited by the Association for Business Psychology) programmes: these were launched in 2015.

Before joining Loughborough he was course director for the distance-learning MSc in Occupational Psychology at the University of Leicester. He has also worked for several years in both research and lecturing roles at the University of Nottingham. After leaving Nottingham, he joined City University where he was involved in the re-design of selection processes for UK doctors.

He is a BPS Verified Assessor and a training provider for qualifications in psychometric testing (Test User Ability and Test User Personality). He is a member of the BPS Division of Occupational Psychology Training Committee. In 2016, with Prof. John Arnold and colleagues, he published the sixth edition of the textbook Work Psychology: Understanding Human Behaviour in the Workplace.

Ray's current research interests focus on the impact of work on employee well-being, satisfaction and performance. In this research he has investigated the impact of job re-design, leadership and teamworking from a number of different perspectives, using a variety of different methods. While retaining an interest in the study of work-related stress, he is now focusing on investigating how the processes of planning, implementing and managing change at work can be monitored and used to influence change outcomes. Several elements of this work have been carried out in collaboration with researchers in Sweden (at the Karolinska Institute) and in Denmark (at the National Research Centre for the Work Environment). His other main research interests are the prediction and assessment of work performance. More specifically, these currently include the study of the interpersonal dynamics of performance appraisal at work and examination of the properties of various employee selection and development methods.

He currently supervises several PhD students investigating a range topics including: public and patient involvement in the NHS; work-life balance in developing countries; work-life boundary management by remote workers; the impact of organisational change on emergency service workers; perceptions of ethical practice in the financial services sector; job crafting and the management of the psychological contract in consultancy work roles; and the evaluation of the impact of mindfulness and emotion-regulation interventions. 

Nielsen, K, Randall, R, Christensen, KB (2017) Do different training conditions facilitate team implementation? A quasi-experimental mixed methods studyJournal of Mixed Methods Research, 11(2), pp.223-247, ISSN: 1558-6901. Full text: http://mmr.sagepub.com/content/early/2015/06/10/1558689815589050.abstract. DOI: 10.1177/1558689815589050.

Houdmont, J and Randall, R (2016) Working hours and common mental disorders in English police officersOccupational Medicine, 66(9), pp.713-718, ISSN: 1471-8405. DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqw166.

Arnold, Randall, R, Patterson, F, Silvester, J, Robertson, I, Cooper, C, Burnes, B, Harris, D, Axtell, C (2016) Work Psychology: Understanding Human Behaviour in the Workplace 6th edition, Pearson, ISBN: 978-1-292-06340-9.

Silvester, J, Wyatt, M, Randall, R (2014) Politician personality, Machiavellianism, and political skill as predictors of performance ratings in political roles<https://dspace.lboro.ac.uk/2134/15232>, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 87(2), pp.258-279, ISSN: 0963-1798. DOI: 10.1111/joop.12038<http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joop.12038>.

Nielsen, K and Randall, R (2013) Opening the black box: A framework for evaluating organizational-level occupational health interventions<http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.2012.690556>, European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 22(5), pp.601-617, ISSN: 1359-432X. DOI: 10.1080/1359432X.2012.690556<http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1359432X.2012.690556>.