Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Human Biology

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Human Biology
Programme code PSUB12
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code B150, B151
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/b150

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/b151

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to develop an understanding of Human Biology and provide a firm foundation in scientific method including laboratory and analytical skills
  • to promote and develop independent learning and encourage and support professional studies in human biology

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statements for Biosciences and Anthropology (Biological);
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications;
  • Criteria for recognition by Society of Biology

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a broadly-based core curriculum covering the major concepts, principles and theories associated with Human Biological Sciences from a whole body perspective
  • identify, explain and discuss theoretical frameworks appropriate to the study of Human Biology
  • demonstrate an understanding of knowledge of critical arguments in human biology that are at the forefront of the discipline

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • analyse, synthesise and summarise information critically, including published research or reports;
  • recognise and apply subject-specific theories, concepts or principles;
  • apply subject knowledge and understanding to address familiar and unfamiliar problems;
  • obtain and integrate several lines of subject-specific evidence to formulate and test hypotheses;
  • recognise the ethical issues of investigations and apply ethical standards and professional codes of conduct.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • design, plan, conduct and report on investigations, which may involve primary or secondary data (eg, from a survey database); these data may be obtained through individual or group projects;
  • obtain, record, collate and analyse data using appropriate techniques in the field and/or laboratory, working by themselves or in a group;
  • undertake field and/or laboratory investigations of the living human being or human material in a responsible, safe and ethical manner; showing sensitivity to the impact of investigations on the subjects under investigation and paying due attention to risk assessment, relevant health and safety regulations, and consent procedures.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed a range of communication, information technology, interpersonal, self-management and generic cognitive skills. They should be able to: 

  • communicate effectively in a variety of formats;
  • cite and reference work in an appropriate manner
  • use information technology effectively as a learning and communication tool;
  • work effectively as an individual and as part of a team;
  • manage personal learning efficiently and effectively;
  • develop skills management for lifelong learning including target setting for personal, academic and career development;
  • develop the ability to work independently.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Compulsory Introductory  Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA602

Biochemistry and Cell Biology 20 1
PSA606 Anatomy and Physiology 20 1&2
PSA601 Laboratory Skills for Biology 1 20 1&2
PSA604 Study Skills, Research Design and Data Description 20 1&2
PSA603 Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 2
PSA605 Human Evolution and Adaptation 20

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits.

Year-long modules have equal credit weightings per semester.

 

4.2a      Part B - Compulsory Degree Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB612 Functional Genomics 20 1
PSB211 Exercise Physiology 20 1&2
PSB403 Research Methods: Data Analysis 20 1&2
PSB614 Growth, Development and Ageing 20 1&2
PSB207 Current Topics in Human Nutrition 10

2

PSB202 Research Methods: Measurement and Evaluation 10

 2 

 

4.2b      Part B - Optional Degree Modules

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Undergraduate Module Catalogue or Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB032

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health 10 1
PSB022 Biochemistry of Exercise and Nutrition 20

1&2 

CMB111 Interdisciplinary Science 20

1&2

PSB611 Laboratory Skills for Biology II 20

1&2

PSB002 Structural Kinesiology 10

2

PSB613 Cellular Signalling and Transport 20

2

  A module from the University Undergraduate Module Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director 10

1 or 2

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester. 

Year-long modules have equal credit weightings per semester.

 

4.3       Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

DPS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with professional training will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI002.

OR

DIntS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with international studies will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI005.

 

4.4a       Part C - Compulsory Degree Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC200*

Project 40 1&2

*The compulsory project module PSC200 is divided between Semesters 1 and 2 with a permitted modular weigh distribution of 10:30 or 20:20

 

4.4b       Part C - Optional Degree Modules:

80 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Undergraduate Module Catalogue or Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC715 Physiology of Sport, Exercise and Health 20 1&2
PSC219 Human Performance at Environmental Extremes 20 1
PSC505 Forensic DNA Analysis 20 1
PSC206 Lifestyle and Disease 20 1
PSC204 Infectious Diseases in Humans 10 1
PSC022 Sport Injuries 10 1
PSC032 Physical Activity and Health of Children 20 2
PSC208 Body Composition 10 2
PSC020 Sport Nutrition 10 2
  Part C module(s) from the University Undergraduate Module Catalogue or a module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director 10 or 20 1 or 2

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester. 

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XX

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C). The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Psychology (students entering prior to 2016)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society (BPS) for graduate membership and the basis for chartership (GBC)

Final award BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS
Programme title Psychology
Programme code PSUB13
Length of programme 3 years (4 years DPS/DIntS)
UCAS code C800, C801
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c800

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c801

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The overarching aim of the Psychology BSc is to provide graduates with the basic skills to be able to begin a career as a chartered psychologist. This is achieved by meeting the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS). Psychology programmes, like ours, which have this accreditation, must demonstrate that they equip graduates with the necessary skills to start on the path to becoming a professional in the field.  This means demonstrating that we:

  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills required for a career as a chartered psychologist
  • develop and promote independent learning
  • develop knowledge of a range of research skills and methods for investigating experience and behaviour
  • promote and provide, where appropriate, a multi-disciplinary educational experience

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBR curriculum
  • Benchmark statements for Psychology
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the core sub fields of the discipline: biological, cognitive, conceptual and historical issues, developmental, individual differences and social psychology.
  • With reference to appropriate research designs, describe a range of quantitative, qualitative and statistical research methods and techniques appropriate to psychometrics and psychological testing

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning, and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology;
  • adopt multiple perspectives, systematically analyse the relationships between them and use these insights to make informed critical judgements and evaluations;
  • search for similarities and general principles in order to detect meaningful patterns in psychological functioning;
  • recognise the continuous significance and import for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and have some appreciation of the complexities their recognition raises;
  • conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating at an appropriate level the relevant skills associated with personal planning, project management.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a multitude of settings
  • Design an experiment to test the evidence for a specific theory or hypothesis taking into account an appropriate range of relevant variables
  • Collect both a qualitative and quantitative data and apply appropriate analytic techniques to each
  • Communicate and listen effectively, and be aware of how ethical considerations are relevant to professional psychological interactions.  
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources
  • Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise psychological information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources
  • Work independently and in groups to solve problems including the ability to clarify, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.
  • Communicate effectively to a range of audiences on psychological topics using an appropriate medium

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules

           

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSA301

Introductory Neuroscience

10

1

C

PSA305

Basic Developmental Psychology

10

1

C

PSA307

Social & Cultural Psychologies

10

1

C

PSA311

Study Skills for Psychology

10

1

C

PSA314

Psychology: Shaping the Discipline

20

1

C

PSA302

Professions in Psychology

10

2

C

PSA308

Basic Biological Psychology

10

2

C

PSA310

Basic Experimental Psychology

20

2

C

PSA351

Psychology Practicals

20

2

C

 

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules

 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSB314

Organisational Behaviour

10

1

C

PSB319

Individual Differences

10

1

C

PSB353

Human Memory and Cognition Part 1

10

1

C

PSB355

Developmental and Social Psychology

20

1

C

PSB403

Experiment Design and Analysis B1

10

1

C

PSB316

Qualitative Design and Analysis for Psychology

10

2

C

PSB320

Brain and Behaviour

20

2

C

PSB351

Psychology Practicals B

10

2

C

PSB354

Human Memory and Cognition Part 2

10

2

C

PSB404

Experiment Design and Analysis B2

10

2

C

 

4.3       Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

DPS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with professional training will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI003.

OR

DIntS Route (2015 entry onwards): Candidates on degree programmes with international studies will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI005.

 

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules

 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSC300

Project

40

1&2

C

PSC033

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education

10

1

O

PSC301

Advanced Experimental & Qualitative Design & Analysis

20

1

O

PSC319

The Psychology of Eating Behaviours

20

1

O

SSC130

The Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

1

O

PSC321

Psychology of Workplace Health

20

1

O

SSC171

Advanced Social Psychology

10

1

O

SSC020

Race and Racism

20

1

O

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

1

O

 

Part C module(s) from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

or

20

1

or

2

O

PSC036

Applied Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSC311

Clinical Psychology

20

2

O

PSC315

Psychology and Health

20

2

O

PSC320

Parenting and Socialisation

20

2

O

BSC720

Behavioural Decision Science

10

2

O

BSC722

Consumer Behaviour

10

2

O

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting. 

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.  Students who opt for a 50/70 or 70/50 split of credit weightings must have the permission of the Programme Director.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XX

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science (Intercalated)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)
Programme title Sport and Exercise Science (Intercalated)
Programme code PSUB07
Length of programme The duration of the programme is two semesters. The programme is normally available on a full-time basis only.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

The programme is restricted to students taking an intercalated year out of a recognized UK programme of medical training, normally leading to the degrees of MBBS or MBChB or equivalent, who have already successfully completed the first two or more years of their medical degree.

The School will review the academic history of candidates for admission to ensure that the individual is adequately prepared for the programme.

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills
  • to enable students to benefit from a broad curriculum grounded in the study of sport, exercise science and pedagogy
  • to enable students to engage with issues through specialist study and research
  • to allow students to draw upon knowledge and expertise in both teaching and research to support their professional practice
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme
  • to support the student experience through effective management and improvement of the School’s learning and teaching resources

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Subject Benchmark Statement (Unit 25 : Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2001)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate: 

  • an ability to reflect critically upon approaches to the acquisition, interpretation and analysis of information in a variety of sport contexts
  • their knowledge and understanding of sport-related behaviour through critical evaluation of both academic and professional practices

 

Module choice will be important in determining whether the following intended learning outcomes are achieved: 

  • an understanding of human structure and function addressed in multi- discipline based enquiry
  • an ability to appraise and evaluate the effects of sport and exercise intervention on the participant and special populations
  • the importance of the social, economic and political domains to explain the development and differentiation of sport in society.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • reflect critically on the central themes and issues in modules within the programme
  • critically assess and interpret evidence from data and text derived from sport-related enquiry
  • present a reasoned argument to assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and instructional models
  • relate theory to practice in sport, exercise and pedagogy
  • apply knowledge to solve problems in a variety of laboratory and sport-based practicals
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • plan, design and execute a sustained piece of independent research
  • monitor and evaluate sports performance in laboratories and field settings
  • undertake laboratory and fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment
  • plan, prepare and present appropriate techniques and skills to develop practice in a range of sport activities
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed competencies in the following generic skill areas: 

  • communication
  • numeracy
  • information technology
  • team work
  • problem solving
  • management of self learning

 

(ref. Skills for Success Programme http://www.lboro.ac.uk/service/ltd/services/stud_support/programme.html)

4. Programme structure

Part C - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSC003*

Or

PSC005*

Dissertation

 

Project: Physiology

40

1&2

O

PSC028

Advanced Sport Biomechanics

20

1&2

O

PSC100

Science and Elite Performance in Sport

20

1&2

O

PSC715

Physiology of Sport, Exercise and Health

20

1&2

O

Or

 

Part C module(s) from the University Undergraduate Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

or

20

1 &/or 2

 

O

PSC017

Sport Pedagogy 3

20

1

O

PSC022

Sport Injuries

10

1

O

PSC024

Sport, the Body and Deviance

10

1

O

PSC033

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education

10

1

O

PSC035

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence

10

1

O

PSC018

Teaching and Coaching 3

20

2

O

PSC020

Sport Nutrition

10

2

O

PSC023

Sport, Celebrity and Place

10

2

O

PSC027

Advanced Motor Control of Sports Movements

10

2

O

PSC032

Physical Activity and Health of Children

20

2

O

PSC034

Sport Psychology in Action

10

2

O

PSC036

Applied Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSC044

Global Issues in Sport

10

2

O

 Modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.  Students who opt for a 50/70 or 70/50 split of credit weightings must have the permission of the Programme Director.

* Students may opt for either PSC003 or PSC005, not both.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XX

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in Part C modules at Loughborough University.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science (2015 to 2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/BSc (Hons)+ DPS/DIntS
Programme title Sport and Exercise Science
Programme code PSUB02
Length of programme 3 years (4 years DPS/DIntS)
UCAS code CX63, C600
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c600

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/cx63

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills
  • to enable students to benefit from a broad curriculum grounded in the study of sport, exercise science and pedagogy
  • to enable students to engage with issues through specialist study and research
  • to allow students to draw upon knowledge and expertise in both teaching and research to support their professional practice
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme
  • to support the student experience through effective management and improvement of the School’s learning and teaching resources

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Subject Benchmark Statement (Unit 25 : Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2001)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate: 

  • an ability to reflect critically upon approaches to the acquisition, interpretation and analysis of information in a variety of sport contexts
  • their knowledge and understanding of sport-related behaviour through critical evaluation of both academic and professional practices

 

Module choice will be important in determining whether the following intended learning outcomes are achieved: 

  • an understanding of human structure and function addressed in multi- discipline based enquiry
  • an ability to appraise and evaluate the effects of sport and exercise intervention on the participant and special populations
  • the importance of the social, economic and political domains to explain the development and differentiation of sport in society.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • reflect critically on the central themes and issues in modules within the programme
  • critically assess and interpret evidence from data and text derived from sport-related enquiry
  • present a reasoned argument to assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and instructional models
  • relate theory to practice in sport, exercise and pedagogy
  • apply knowledge to solve problems in a variety of laboratory and sport-based practicals
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • plan, design and execute a sustained piece of independent research
  • monitor and evaluate sports performance in laboratories and field settings
  • undertake laboratory and fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment
  • plan, prepare and present appropriate techniques and skills to develop practice in a range of sport activities
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed competencies in the following generic skill areas: 

  • communication
  • numeracy
  • information technology
  • team work
  • problem solving
  • management of self learning

 

(ref. Skills for Success Programme http://www.lboro.ac.uk/service/ltd/services/stud_support/programme.html)

4. Programme structure

4.1         Part A  - Introductory Modules

           

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSA001

Teaching and Coaching 1

20

1&2

C

PSA003

Academic and Professional Skills

10

1&2

C

PSA011

Introduction to Sport Pedagogy

10

1

C

PSA020

Introduction to Human and Exercise Physiology

10

1

C

PSA024

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

10

1

C

PSA028

Biomechanics of Sport

10

1

C

PSA005

Issues in Sport and Exercise Science

10

2

C

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

10

2

C

PSA027 

Introduction to Motor Control & Motor Learning

10

2

C

PSA030

Introduction to Physical Activity and Health

10

2

C

PSA040

Sports Enterprise

10

2

C

All modules are compulsory with an equal weighting of 60 credits in each semester

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSB001

Teaching and Coaching 2

20

1&2

O

PSB010

Sport Pedagogy 2

20

1&2

O

PSB022

Biochemistry of Exercise and Nutrition

20

1&2

O

PSB211

Exercise Physiology

20

1&2

O

Or

Part B module(s) from the University Undergraduate Module Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

Or

20

1

&/Or

2

O

PSB005

Research Skills B1

10

1

C

PSB024

Making Sense of Modern Sport

10

1

O

PSB027

Motor Control of Sports Movements

10

1

O

PSB029

Biomechanics of Sports Movements

10

1

O

PSB031

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

10

1

O

PSB032 

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health

10

1

O

PSB051

Foundations of Sports Law

10

1

O

PSB002

Structural Kinesiology

10

2

O

PSB006

Research Skills B2

10

2

C

PSB015

Sport, Ideologies and Values

10

2

O

PSB026

Group and Interpersonal Processes in Competitive Sport

10

2

O

PSB028

Methods of Analysis in Sports Biomechanics

10

2

O

PSB033

Principles of Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSB052

Managing Sports Organisations

10

2

O

 

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

4.3       Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

DPS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with professional training will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI004.

OR

DIntS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with international studies will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI005.

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSC003*

Or

PSC005*

Dissertation

 

Project: Physiology

40

1&2

O

PSC028

Advanced Sport Biomechanics

 20 

1&2

O

PSC100**

Science and Elite Performance in Sport

20

1&2

O

PSC715

Physiology of Sport, Exercise and Health

20

1&2

O

Or

 

Part C module(s) from the University Undergraduate Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

or

20

1 &/or 2

 

O

PSC017

Sport Pedagogy 3

20

1

O

PSC022

Sport Injuries

10

1

O

PSC024

Sport, the Body and Deviance

10

1

O

PSC033

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education

10

1

O

PSC035

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence

10

1

O

PSC045

Advanced Sport Marketing

10

1

O

PSC018

Teaching and Coaching 3

20

2

O

PSC020

Sport Nutrition

10

2

O

PSC023

Sport, Celebrity and Place

10

2

O

PSC027

Advanced Motor Control of Sports Movements

10

2

O

PSC032

Physical Activity and Health of Children

20

2

O

PSC034

Sport Psychology in Action

10

2

O

PSC036

Applied Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSC044

Global Issues in Sport

10

2

O

Modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester. 

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

*Students may opt for either PSC003 or PSC005, not both

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XX

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Sport Management (2015 to 2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS
Programme title Sport Management
Programme code PSUB01
Length of programme 3 years (4 years DPS/DIntS)
UCAS code N222, N281
Admissions criteria

BSc DIS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n281

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n222

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills
  • to allow students to draw upon knowledge and expertise in both teaching and research to support their professional practice
  • to enable students to gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of issues in sport, leisure and management through specialist study and research
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme
  • to support the student experience through effective management and improvement of the School’s learning and teaching resources.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Subject Benchmark Statement (Unit 25 : Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate: 

  • an ability to reflect critically upon approaches to the acquisition, interpretation and analysis of information in a variety of sport and leisure contexts
  • their knowledge and understanding of sport, management and leisure-related behaviour through critical evaluation of both academic and professional practices
  • the importance of the social, economic and political domains to explain the development and differentiation of sport and leisure in society
  • the importance of policy, planning and management to the delivery of sport and leisure opportunities
  • an ability to understand, critically evaluate and reflect upon issues of lifestyle, consumption and culture, and to analyse the affect that they can have on people’s leisure
  • an ability to appraise and evaluate the effects of sport, exercise and leisure interventions on individual and special populations

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • reflect critically on the central themes and issues in modules within the programme
  • critically assess and interpret evidence from data and text derived from sport and leisure enquiry
  • present a reasoned argument to assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and instructional models
  • relate theory to practice in sport, leisure and management
  • review the social, political, economic and physical contexts of leisure and assess the impact of these upon leisure operations
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • plan, design and execute a sustained piece of independent research 
  • monitor and evaluate sport and leisure activities in field settings 
  • undertake fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment 
  • apply vocationally relevant concepts to the operation and strategic management of human, financial and physical resources 

Only in placement year (Diploma in Professional Studies): 

  • demonstrate vocationally relevant managerial skills and knowledge with experience of professional practice
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed competencies in the following generic skill areas: 

  • communication
  • numeracy
  • information technology
  • team work
  • problem solving
  • management of self learning 

(ref. Skills for Success Programme http://www.lboro.ac.uk/service/ltd/services/stud_support/programme.html)

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules

           

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSA001

Teaching and Coaching 1

20

1&2

O

BSA512

The Leisure Market

10

1

C

PSA003

Academic and Professional Skills

10

1&2

C

PSA024

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

10

1

C

PSA044

The Sport Industries

20

1

C

PSA011

Introduction to Sport Pedagogy

10

1

O

PSA020

Introduction to Human and Exercise Physiology

10

1

O

PSA028

Biomechanics of Sport

10

1

O

BSA510

Economic Environment of Leisure Management

10

2

C

BSA530

Behaviour in Sporting Organisations

10

2

C

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSA027

Introduction to Motor Control & Motor Learning

10

2

O

PSA030 

Introduction to Physical Activity and Health 

10

2

O

PSA040 

Sports Enterprise 

10

2

C

PSA041

Olympic Studies

20

2

C

Or

Part A module(s) from the University Undergraduate Module Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

Or

20

1

Or

2

O

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.  Students who opt for a 50/70 or 70/50 split of credit weightings must have the permission of the Programme Director.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSB001

Teaching and Coaching 2

20

1&2

O

PSB010

Sport Pedagogy 2

20

1&2

O

PSB211

Exercise Physiology

20

1&2

O

Or

Part B module(s) from the University Undergraduate Module Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

Or

20

1

&/Or

2

O

BSB510

Human Resource Management in Sports Organisations

10

1

C

BSB520

Principles of Marketing for Sport and Leisure

10

1

C

BSB531

Financial Accounting for Sport

10

1

C

PSB005

Research Skills B1

10

1

C

PSB051

Foundations of Sports Law

10

1

C

PSB024

Making Sense of Modern Sport

10

1

O

PSB027

Motor Control of Sports Movements

10

1

O

PSB029

Biomechanics of Sports Movements

10

1

O

PSB031

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

10

1

O

PSB032 

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health 

10

1

O

BSB522

The Marketing Mix for Sport and Leisure

10

2

C

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10

2

C

PSB006

Research Skills B2

10

2

C

PSB044

Sport, Inclusion and Diversity

10

2

C

PSB052

Managing Sport Organisations

10

2

C

PSB015

Sport, Ideologies and Values

10

2

O

PSB026

Group and Interpersonal Processes in Competitive Sport

10

2

O

PSB028

Methods of Analysis in Sports Biomechanics

10

2

O

PSB033

Principles of Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

 

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.  Students who opt for a 50/70 or 70/50 split of credit weightings must have the permission of the Programme Director.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

4.3       Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

DPS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with professional training will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI001.

OR

DIntS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with international studies will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI005.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSC003

Dissertation

40

1&2

C

BSC565

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

10

1

C

PSC045

Advanced Sport Marketing

10

1

C

PSC049

Sport Policy Analysis

20

1

C

PSC046

Sports Economics

20

2

C

PSC047

Sports Governance

20

2

C

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Sport Science with Management (2015 to 2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSC (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Sport Science with Management
Programme code PSUB03
Length of programme 3 years (4 years DPS/DIntS)
UCAS code CN62, CN6F
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/sport-exercise-health-sciences/sportssciencewithmanagement/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills
  • to enable students to benefit from a broad curriculum grounded in the study of sport, exercise science, pedagogy and management
  • to enable students to gain in-depth knowledge and understanding of issues in sport, exercise science, leisure and management through specialist study and research
  • to allow students to draw upon knowledge and expertise in both teaching and research to support their professional practice
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme
  • to support the student experience through effective management and improvement of the School’s learning and teaching resources.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Subject Benchmark Statement (Unit 25 : Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2001)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate: 

  • an ability to reflect critically upon approaches to the acquisition, interpretation and analysis of information in a variety of sport contexts
  • their knowledge and understanding of sport, management and leisure- related behaviour
  • an understanding of theories, principles and practice, developed from study of core management areas of human resources, finance, economics, marketing and operations as applied to sport and leisure contexts
  • the importance of policy, planning and management to the delivery of sport and leisure operations 

Module choice will be important in determining whether the following intended learning outcomes are achieved: 

  • the importance of the social, economic and political domains to explain the development and differentiation of sport in society.
  • an understanding of human structure and function addressed in multi- discipline based enquiry
  • an ability to understand, critically evaluate and reflect upon issues of lifestyle, consumption and culture, and to analyse the affect that they can have on people’s leisure.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • reflect critically on the central themes and issues in modules within the programme
  • critically assess and interpret evidence from data and text derived from sport and leisure related enquiry
  • present a reasoned argument to assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and instructional models
  • relate theory to practice in sport, exercise, leisure and management
  • apply knowledge to solve problems in a variety of laboratory and sport-based practicals
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • plan, design and execute a sustained piece of independent research
  • monitor and evaluate sports performance in laboratories and field settings
  • undertake laboratory and fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment
  • plan, prepare and present appropriate techniques and skills to develop practice in a range of sport activities
  • apply vocationally relevant concepts to the operation and strategic management of human, financial and physical resources
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed competencies in the following generic skill areas:

  • communication
  • numeracy
  • information technology
  • team work
  • problem solving
  • management of self learning

 

(ref. Skills for Success Programme http://www.lboro.ac.uk/service/ltd/services/stud_support/programme.html)  

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules

           

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSA001

Teaching and Coaching 1

20

1&2

O

BSA512

The Leisure Market

10

1

O

PSA003

Academic and Professional Skills

10

1&2

C

PSA011

Introduction to Sport Pedagogy

10

1

O

PSA020

Introduction to Human and Exercise Physiology

10

1

O

PSA024

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

10

1

O

PSA028

Biomechanics of Sport

10

1

O

PSA044

The Sport Industries

20

1

C

BSA510

Economic Environment of Leisure Management

10

2

O

BSA530

Behaviour in Sporting Organisations

10

2

C

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSA027 

Introduction to Motor Control & Motor Learning

10

2

O

PSA030

Introduction to Physical Activity and Health 

10

2

O

PSA040 

Sports Enterprise 

10

2

O

PSA041

Olympic Studies

10

2

O

Or

Part A module(s) from the University Undergraduate Module Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

Or

20

1

Or

2

O

 *Students are not permitted to take additional optional modules from the School of Business and Economics in Part A.

 

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.  Students who opt for a 50/70 or 70/50 split of credit weightings must have the permission of the Programme Director.

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSB001

Teaching and Coaching 2

20

1&2

O

PSB010

Sport Pedagogy 2

20

1&2

O

PSB211

Exercise Physiology

20

1&2

O

Or

Part B module(s) from the University Undergraduate Module Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

Or

20

1

&/Or

2

O

BSB510M

Human Resource Management in Sports Organisations

10

1

O

BSB520M

Principles of Marketing for Sport and Leisure

10

1

C

BSB530M

Accounting for Business

10

1

C

PSB005

Research Skills B1

10

1

C

PSB024

Making Sense of Modern Sport

10

1

O

PSB027

Motor Control of Sports Movements

10

1

O

PSB029

Biomechanics of Sports Movements

10

1

O

PSB031

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

10

1

O

PSB032 

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health 

10

1

O

BSB522M

The Marketing Mix for Sport and Leisure

10

2

C

BSB532M

Accounting for Managers

10

2

C

PSB002

Structural Kinesiology

10

2

O

PSB006

Research Skills B2

10

2

C

PSB015

Sport, Ideologies and Values

10

2

O

PSB026

Group and Interpersonal Processes in Competitive Sport

10

2

O

PSB028

Methods of Analysis in Sports Biomechanics

10

2

O

PSB033

Principles of Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSB044M

Sport, Social Inclusion and Diversity

10

2

O

PSB052M

Managing Sport Organisations

10

2

O

 

M Signifies management modules which, combined, should not exceed a maximum modular weight of 50.

 

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.  Students who opt for a 50/70 or 70/50 split of credit weightings must have the permission of the Programme Director.

4.3       Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

DPS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with professional training will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI004.

OR

DIntS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with international studies will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI005.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

PSC003*

Dissertation

40

1&2

O

PSC005*

Project:  Physiology

40

1&2

O

PSC028

Advanced Sport Biomechanics

20

1&2

O

PSC100

Science and Elite Performance in Sport

20

1&2

O

PSC715

Physiology of Sport, Exercise and Health

20

1&2

O

PSC032

Physical Activity and Health of Children 

20

2

O

Or

Part C module(s) from the University Undergraduate Catalogue or a module from the University Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by the Programme Director

10

Or

20

1

&/or

2

O

BSC565

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

10

1

C

PSC049

Sport Policy Analysis

20

1

C

PSC017

Sport Pedagogy 3

20

1

O

PSC022

Sport Injuries

10

1

O

PSC024

Sport, the Body and Deviance

10

1

O

PSC033

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education

10

1

O

PSC035

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence

10

1

O

PSC045

Advanced Sport Marketing

10

1

O

PSC018

Teaching and Coaching 3

20

2

O

PSC020

Sport Nutrition

10

2

O

PSC023

Sport, Celebrity and Place

10

2

O

PSC027

Advanced Motor Control of Sports Movements

10

2

O

PSC034

Sport Psychology in Action

10

2

O

PSC036

Applied Exercise Psychology

10

2

O

PSC044

Global Issues in Sport

10

2

O

PSC046

Sports Economics

20

2

O

PSC047

Sports Governance

20

2

O

*Students may opt for either PSC003 or PSC005, not both

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting. 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc/MSci Biological Sciences

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/ BSc (Hons) + DIntS; MSci (Hons)/ MSci (Hons) + DPS/ MSci (Hons) + DIntS
Programme title Biological Sciences
Programme code PSUB18/PSUM08
Length of programme BSc 3 years; BSc with DPS/DIntS 4 years; MSci 4 years; MSci with DPS/DIntS 5 years
UCAS code C102, C100, C103, C101
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c102

BSc + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c100

MSci - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c103

MSci + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c101

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To develop students’ scientific knowledge and understanding of scientific processes underlying  life on earth from the molecular to organism level, with particular focus on those relevant to human health 
  • To develop students’ programme relevant practical skills, application of these skills to address a problem, and their critical awareness of practical techniques 
  • To develop students’ intellectual skills to research and synthesise scientific information, to apply their knowledge to develop arguments and to critically evaluate material, to equip graduates with the skills necessary to update their knowledge and understanding over a future career. 
  • To develop research skills to enable students to design and test hypotheses and to interpret and present data. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to apply intellectual, research, and practical skills to design and conduct an independent piece of research 
  • To facilitate students’ engagement with emerging research in selected specialised areas to further their depth of understanding of life processes and develop their appreciation of the provisional nature of scientific knowledge 
  • To enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the importance of biological sciences in an industrial, economic, environmental, social and ethical context 
  • To equip students with transferable and independent learning skills for relevant employment 
  • Through providing the above skills, to advance students’ understanding of the breadth of biological sciences to support a variety of potential careers in both academia and industry through study, research and the opportunity to specialise via a dedicated research project in a chosen scientific area 
  • To support students with knowledge and skills acquisition  in the current and relevant areas of Biology, Biochemistry, Cellular Biology, Molecular Biology, Physiology, Genetics and Evolution  

Additional Aims at Part D: 

  • To foster in students a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of biosciences research 
  • To equip students with a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship 
  • To develop students’ ability to show originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge for the interrogation of complex life systems 
  • To provide students with an understanding and ability to work between disciplines, including an awareness of techniques, methods and protocols used across the scope of the Biosciences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Biosciences
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  K1

Key subject specific terminology, nomenclature, conventions and units;

  K2

The fundamental experimental techniques which inform the discipline;

  K3

Some major issues currently at the frontiers of research and development;

  K4

Safety, risk, hazard and ethics assessment as relevant to the discipline;

  K5

The main types of biological reaction and the key chemical characteristics associated with them;

  K6

The complexity of biological phenomena and how this is associated with evolutionary theory;

  K7

The diversity of structure in biology and the interrelationship between structure and function;

  K8

The rules of inheritance as governed and influenced by the structure of DNA;

  K9 Cellular types and key stages of cellular metabolism;
  K10 The association between societal developments and biological advances with an emphasis on the ethical landscape of biology;
  K11 The principles and methods used in understanding life and its relationship to health;
  K12 The link between cellular and molecular changes and physiological adaptation in health and disease;
  K13 Fundamental laws underpinning physiological function and adaptation;

 Additional knowledge and understanding at Part D:

  K14 A systematic and comprehensive understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at the forefront of scientific research;
  K15 Knowledge and awareness of the accepted norms and professional expectations associated with the generation and publication of scientific results;

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

  C1

Apply their knowledge and understanding of essential facts, key concepts, principles and theories to solve problems and debate critical issues within the subject area;

  C2

Identify and analyse novel scientific problems and plan strategies for their solution, and apply acquired knowledge and understanding to inform individual research;

  C3

Solve quantitative and qualitative problems and collate, evaluate and interpret scientific information and data;

  C4

Research, justify and critically evaluate scientific material and arguments in a coherent and organised way appropriately adapted to the audience;

Additional subject specific cognitive skills at Part D:

  C5

Select appropriate research and enquiry strategies to solve complex problems or problems with incomplete data;

  C6

Demonstrate advanced analytical thinking skills and be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;

  C7

Critically evaluate current research, appropriate to the speciality;

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

  P1

Apply a broad range of practical investigative techniques including data collection, data analysis, statistical evaluation, hypotheses formulating and testing, current contextualisation and external referencing and validation;

  P2

Record, describe and critically evaluate data sets;

  P3

Extract, manipulate and interpret data from scientific databases;

  P4

Handle materials safely by taking into account their physical and inherent material properties, e.g. biological activity or chemical hazards;

  P5

Conduct standard laboratory procedures including the operation of standard instrumentation for the analysis of materials and recording of results;

  P6

Appropriately, monitor, record and document events and changes by observation and measurement;

  P7

Plan, design and execute practical investigations from the problem recognition stage, to the selection of appropriate techniques and procedures, through to the evaluation and appraisal of the results and findings;

  P8

Conduct thorough hazard/risk assessments associated with scientific investigations covering the materials, equipment and laboratory/field environment and comply with relevant ethical approval procedures for working with humans, human tissue samples, and mammalian cell culture;

Additional subject specific practical skills at Part D

  P9

Apply appropriate research techniques to develop new insights to investigate and solve problems;

  P10

Explain experimental results in terms of a broad range of theoretical mechanisms and concepts;

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

  T1

Apply numeracy and computational skills including error analysis, order of magnitude estimations, correct use of units and modes of data presentation;

  T2

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret quantitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively;

  T3

Select and apply appropriate technology from the range available to collate, present and evaluate results and ideas to a professional standard;

  T4

Work independently to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach end goals and evaluate outcomes;

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions;

  T6

Effectively manage time and effort in the organisation of work to ensure independent and pragmatic learning;

  T7

Work effectively in a team by co-operating and negotiating with peers, making decisions and resolving issues, difficulties and conflicts, as applicable;

  T8

Communicate in a variety of formats, both written and oral;

Additional transferable skills at Part D

  T9

Exercise initiative and demonstrate personal responsibility including in the making of decisions;

  T10

Demonstrate an advanced ability to handle and interpret complex information in a structured and systematic way;

  T11

Develop the independent learning skills required for continued professional development and lifelong learning;

  T12 Understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives.

4. Programme structure

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits.

Year-long modules have equal credit weightings per semester.

4.1    Part A - Compulsory Introductory Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA601

Laboratory Skills for Biology I 20 1&2
PSA602 Biochemistry and Cell Biology 20 1
PSA604 Study Skills, Research Design and Data Description 20 1&2
PSA606 Anatomy and Physiology 20 1&2
PSA603 Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 2
PSA605 Human Evolution and Adaptation 20 2

 

4.2a    Part B - Compulsory Degree Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB612

Functional Genomics 20 1
PSB611 Laboratory Skills for Biology II 20 1&2
PSB403 Research Methods: Data Analysis 20 1&2
PSB614 Growth Development and Ageing 20 1&2
PSB613 Cellular Signalling and Transport 20 2

 

4.2b    Part B - Optional Degree Modules

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB211

Exercise Physiology  20  1&2 

PSB022

Biochemistry of Exercise and Nutrition 20 1&2

CMB111

Interdisciplinary Science 20 1&2

 

4.3       Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

DPS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with professional training will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI002.

OR

DIntS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with international studies will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI005.

 

4.4a    Part C - Compulsory Degree Modules:

Candidates must take the compulsory 40 credit Bioscience Research Project module which is divided between semesters with a permitted modular weight distribution of 10:30 or 20:20.

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC200

Project  40  1&2 

 

4.4b    Part C - Optional Degree Modules:

80 credits from the optional modules listed in the table below to bring the total credit weighting for each semester to 50, 60 or 70:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC715

Physiology of Sport, Exercise and Health 20 1&2
PSC219 Human Performance at Environmental Extremes 20 1&2
PSC621 Cellular Adaptation and Degeneration 20 1
PSC622 Advanced Genetics of Health 20 1
PSC624 Virology and Oncology 20 1
PSC623 Regenerative Medicine 20 2
PSC020 Sport Nutrition 10 2
PSC208 Body Composition 10 2
PSC032 Physical Activity and Health of Children 20 2

 

4.5    Part D - MSci Compulsory Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSD630

Part D Bioscience Research Project 80 1&2
PSD631 Contemporary Health Issues 20 2
PSD632 Advanced Laboratory and Research Methods in Biology 20 1

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

For BSc

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and Regulation XI for programmes with DPS and DIntS (if applicable).

 

For MSci

For MSci students commencing Part A prior to 2019, in order to progress from Part A to B, from Part B to either Part I or Part C, from Part C to Part D and to be eligible for the award of an Extended Honours degree, candidates must achieve 120 credits and an average mark of 50% at each part.

For MSci commencing Part A or joining a cohort commencing Part A from 2019/20 onwards in order to progress from Part A to B, from Part B to either Part I or Part C, from Part C to Part D and to be eligible for the award of an Extended Honours degree, candidates must achieve 120 credits and an average mark of 55% at each part.

Candidates who, after reassessment, fail to achieve this mark at Part C will not progress to Part D, but may, at the discretion of the Examiners, be eligible for consideration for the award of BSc with a classification based on the candidate’s performance in Parts B and C and determined on  the basis of the Part weightings for the BSc programme (40:60).

Candidates who, after reassessment, fail to qualify for the award of Extended Honours Degree in Part D may, at the discretion of the Examiners, be awarded a BSc with a classification based on the candidate’s performance in Parts B and C and determined on the basis of the Part weightings for the BSc programme (40:60).

Subject to the exception specified below, provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's Special Assessment Period (SAP).

Candidates who have accumulated fewer than 60 credits in any Part of the programme may not undergo re-assessment in the University’s SAP. Re-assessment in the SAP will also not be available for certain modules and this is indicated in individual module specifications.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C (and D if applicable). For BSc (Hons) degrees, the percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part C 60%: Part B 40% to determine the final percentage mark. For MSci degrees, the percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part D 40%: Part C 40%: Part B 20% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc/MSci Biochemistry

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/ BSc (Hons) + DIntS; MSci (Hons)/ MSci (Hons) + DPS/ MSci (Hons) + DIntS
Programme title Biochemistry
Programme code PSUB16/PSUM06
Length of programme BSc 3 years; BSc with DPS/DIntS 4 years; MSci 4 years; MSci with DPS/DIntS 5 years
UCAS code C702, C700, C703, C701
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c702

BSc + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c700

MSci - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c703

MSci + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c701

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To develop students’ scientific knowledge and understanding of scientific processes underlying life on earth from the molecular to organism level, with particular focus on those relevant to human health
  • To develop students’ programme relevant practical skills, application of these skills to address a problem, and their critical awareness of practical techniques
  • To develop students’ intellectual skills to research and synthesise scientific information, to apply their knowledge to develop arguments and to critically evaluate material, to equip graduates with the skills necessary to update their knowledge and understanding over a future career.
  • To develop research skills to enable students to design and test hypotheses and to interpret and present data.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to apply intellectual, research, and practical skills to design and conduct an independent piece of research
  • To facilitate students’ engagement with emerging research in selected specialised areas to further their depth of understanding of life processes and develop their appreciation of the provisional nature of scientific knowledge
  • To enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the importance of biochemistry in an industrial, economic, environmental, social and ethical context
  • To equip students with transferable and independent learning skills for relevant employment
  • Through providing the above skills, to advance students’ understanding of the breadth of biochemistry to support a variety of potential careers in both academia and industry through study, research and the opportunity to specialise via a dedicated research project in a chosen scientific area
  • To support students with knowledge and skills acquisition in the fundamental areas of Biochemistry, Biology and Chemistry in conjunction with supporting subject areas

Additional Aims at Part D

  • To foster in students a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of biochemistry research 
  • To equip students with a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship 
  • To develop students’ ability to show originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge for the interrogation of complex life systems 
  • To provide students with an understanding and ability to work between disciplines, including an awareness of techniques, methods and protocols used across the scope of the Biosciences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Biosciences
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  K1

Key subject specific terminology, nomenclature, conventions and units;
  K2 The fundamental experimental techniques which inform the discipline;
  K3 Some major issues currently at the frontiers of research and development;
  K4 Safety, risk, hazard and ethics assessment as relevant to the discipline;
  K5 The main types of biological reaction and the key chemical characteristics associated with them;
  K6 The complexity of biological phenomena and how this is associated with evolutionary theory;
  K7 The diversity of structure in biology and the interrelationship between structure and function;
  K8 The rules of inheritance as governed and influenced by the structure of DNA;
  K9 Cellular types and key stages of cellular metabolism;
  K10 The association between societal developments and biological advances with an emphasis on the ethical landscape of biology;
  K11 The principles and methods used in understanding biochemistry and its relationship to health;
  K12 The methods for assessing the interactions between chemicals and biological systems;
  K13 The principles and procedures used in macromolecular analysis and the characterisation of structure leading to an understanding of molecular structure and behaviour;
  K14 The laws of chemistry and thermodynamics and their pivotal role in biological reactions (including catalysis);

Additional knowledge and understanding at Part D:

  K15 A systematic and comprehensive understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at the forefront of scientific research;
  K16 Knowledge and awareness of the accepted norms and professional expectations associated with the generation and publication of scientific results;

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

  C1

Apply their knowledge and understanding of essential facts, key concepts, principles and theories to solve problems and debate critical issues within the subject area;
  C2 Identify and analyse novel scientific problems and plan strategies for their solution, and apply acquired knowledge and understanding to inform individual research;
  C3 Solve quantitative and qualitative problems and collate, evaluate and interpret scientific information and data;
  C4 Research, justify and critically evaluate scientific material and arguments in a coherent and organised way appropriately adapted to the audience;

Additional subject specific cognitive skills at Part D:

  C5 Select appropriate research and enquiry strategies to solve complex problems or problems with incomplete data;
  C6 Demonstrate advanced analytical thinking skills and be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  C7 Critically evaluate current research, appropriate to the speciality;
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

  P1

Apply a broad range of practical investigative techniques including data collection, data analysis, statistical evaluation, hypotheses formulating and testing, current contextualisation and external referencing and validation;
  P2 Record, describe and critically evaluate data sets;
  P3 Extract, manipulate and interpret data from scientific databases;
  P4 Handle materials safely by taking into account their physical and inherent material properties, e.g. biological activity or chemical hazards;
  P5 Conduct standard laboratory procedures including the operation of standard instrumentation for the analysis of materials and recording of results;
  P6 Appropriately, monitor, record and document events and changes by observation and measurement;
  P7 Plan, design and execute practical investigations from the problem recognition stage, to the selection of appropriate techniques and procedures, through to the evaluation and appraisal of the results and findings;
  P8 Conduct thorough hazard/risk assessments associated with scientific investigations covering the materials, equipment and laboratory/field environment and comply with relevant ethical approval procedures for working with humans, human tissue samples, and mammalian cell culture;

Additional subject specific practical skills at Part D

  P9 Apply appropriate research techniques to develop new insights to investigate and solve problems;
  P10 Explain experimental results in terms of a broad range of theoretical mechanisms and concepts;
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

  T1

Apply numeracy and computational skills including error analysis, order of magnitude estimations, correct use of units and modes of data presentation;
  T2 Generate, organise, analyse and interpret quantitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively;
  T3 Select and apply appropriate technology from the range available to collate, present and evaluate results and ideas to a professional standard;
  T4 Work independently to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach end goals and evaluate outcomes;
  T5 Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions;
  T6 Effectively manage time and effort in the organisation of work to ensure independent and pragmatic learning;
  T7 Work effectively in a team by co-operating and negotiating with peers, making decisions and resolving issues, difficulties and conflicts, as applicable;
  T8 Communicate in a variety of formats, both written and oral;

Additional transferable skills at Part D

  T9 Exercise initiative and demonstrate personal responsibility including in the making of decisions;
  T10 Demonstrate an advanced ability to handle and interpret complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  T11 Develop the independent learning skills required for continued professional development and lifelong learning;
  T12 Understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives.

4. Programme structure

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits.

Year-long modules have equal credit weightings per semester.

 4.1       Part A - Compulsory Introductory Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA601

Laboratory Skills for Biology I 20 1&2
PSA602 Biochemistry and Cell Biology 20 1
CMA112 Fundamental Chemistry 20 1
PSA604 Study Skills, Research Design and Data Description 20 1&2
CMA106 Structure and Reactivity I 20 2
PSA603 Genetics and Molecular Biology 20

 

4.2a       Part B - Compulsory Degree Modules: 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB612

Functional Genomics 20 1
PSB611 Laboratory Skills for Biology II 20 1&2
PSB403 Research Methods: Data Analysis 20 1&2
PSB022 Biochemistry of Exercise and Nutrition 20 1&2
PSB613 Cellular Signalling and Transport 20

 

4.2b       Part B - Optional Degree Modules: 

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Undergraduate Module Catalogue or Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

CMB106

Structure and Reactivity II 20 1
CMB104 Spectroscopy and Analysis 2 20 1
CMB111 Interdisciplinary Science 20 1&2
PSA606 Anatomy and Physiology 20

1&2

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester. 

 

4.3       Part I - Placement (for programmes with DPS or DInts only)

DPS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with professional training will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI002.

OR

DIntS Route: Candidates on degree programmes with international studies will register for the non-credit bearing placement module PSI005.

 

4.4a       Part C - Compulsory Degree Modules:

Candidates must take the compulsory 40 credit Bioscience Research Project module which is divided between semesters with a permitted modular weight distribution of 10:30 or 20:20.

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC200

Project 40 1&2

 

4.4b       Part C - Optional Degree Modules:

80 credits from the optional modules listed in the table below to bring the total credit weighting for each semester to 50, 60 or 70:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC621

Cellular Adaptation and Degeneration 20 1
PSC622 Advanced Genetics of Health 20 1
PSC624 Virology and Oncology 20 1
XXXXXX Pharmaceutical Analysis and Drug Metabolism 20 1&2
PSC623 Regenerative Medicine 20 2
CMD401 Drugs: Modes of Action and Screening$ 20 2
CMD402 Drug Synthetics and Properties$ 20 2

$modules run alternate academic years

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester. 

 

4.5       Part D - MSci Compulsory Modules:

Candidates must take 120 credits of compulsory modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSD630

Part D Bioscience Research Project 80 1&2
PSD631 Contemporary Health Issues 20 2
PSD632 Advanced Laboratory and Research Methods in Biology 20 1

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

For BSc

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and Regulation XI for programmes with DPS and DIntS (if applicable).

For MSci

For MSci students commencing Part A prior to 2019, in order to progress from Part A to B, from Part B to either Part I or Part C, from Part C to Part D and to be eligible for the award of an Extended Honours degree, candidates must achieve 120 credits and an average mark of 50% at each part.

For MSci commencing Part A or joining a cohort commencing Part A from 2019/20 onwards in order to progress from Part A to B, from Part B to either Part I or Part C, from Part C to Part D and to be eligible for the award of an Extended Honours degree, candidates must achieve 120 credits and an average mark of 55% at each part.

Candidates who, after reassessment, fail to achieve this mark at Part C will not progress to Part D, but may, at the discretion of the Examiners, be eligible for consideration for the award of BSc with a classification based on the candidate’s performance in Parts B and C and determined on  the basis of the Part weightings for the BSc programme (40:60).

Candidates who, after reassessment, fail to qualify for the award of Extended Honours Degree in Part D may, at the discretion of the Examiners, be awarded a BSc with a classification based on the candidate’s performance in Parts B and C and determined on the basis of the Part weightings for the BSc programme (40:60).

Subject to the exception specified below, provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's Special Assessment Period (SAP).

Candidates who have accumulated fewer than 60 credits in any Part of the programme may not undergo re-assessment in the University’s SAP. Re-assessment in the SAP will also not be available for certain modules and this is indicated in individual module specifications.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C (and D if applicable). For BSc (Hons) degrees, the percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part C 60%: Part B 40% to determine the final percentage mark. For MSci degrees, the percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part D 40%: Part C 40%: Part B 20% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Sport, Coaching and Physical Education (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/BSc (Hons)+ DPS/DIntS
Programme title Sport, Coaching and Physical Education
Programme code PSUB04
Length of programme 3 years (4 years DPS/DIntS)
UCAS code C603 / C604
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - 

BSc - 

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The principal aim of the programme is to provide a multi-disciplinary and practically-based approach to the contemporary study of sport, coaching and physical education, underpinned by both sport and exercise science, and critical social and health perspectives.

Specific programme aims are:     

  • To develop students’ specific practical and applied sports science skills (e.g. performance analysis, fitness training, health and physical activity) that will enhance students’ employability in various sport, coaching and physical education related vocations. 
  • To focus on integrated and multidisciplinary content, which allow students to develop their understanding of physical and psychological development and its impact on participation and performance in Sport, Coaching and/or Physical Education. 
  • To develop students’ skills to research, analyse and synthesise scientific information to enable them to develop arguments, critically evaluate material, and conduct an independent piece of research relevant to Sport, Coaching and/or Physical Education. 
  • To provide students with a broad understanding of the importance of Sport, Coaching and Physical Education through a scientific, social, political and ethical lens. 
  • To provide students with real world practice, experiences and opportunities to work towards professional awards in Sport, Coaching and/or Physical Education. 
  • Through the above, to advance students’ understanding of the breadth of disciplines, such as Psychology, Physiology, Physical Activity/Sport and Health, Sociology, Skill Acquisition and Sport Pedagogy, which support a variety of potential careers in Sport, Coaching and/or Physical Education. 
  • To equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to develop and critically reflect upon professional practice and their own future personal development.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

The QAA Subject Benchmark Statements for Leisure and Sport

QAA Quality Code http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/AssuringStandardsAndQuality/Pages/The-Quality-Code.aspx

FHEQ http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance/publication/?PubID=2718#.WZMlVsuWypp

The British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) http://www.bases.org.uk/

The Association for Physical Education (afPE) http://www.afpe.org.uk/

UK Coaching https://www.ukcoaching.org/

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

K1        Key subject specific terminology, concepts, skills and models in underpinning disciplines.

K2        The key principles, techniques, strategies and skills associated with various sports, dance, games and gymnastic activities

K3        Pedagogical and coaching models, philosophies and processes.

K4        Safety, risks, and ethical considerations when teaching, coaching and conducting research.

K5        The associations among societal and political developments, and research, policy and practice.  

K6        Key psychological (e.g. motivation), social (e.g. equity and inclusion) and health (e.g. sport injuries, depression, obesity) issues relating to sport/physical activity, coaching and teaching in varied settings and populations.

K7        The interactions of the skeletal and muscular structures of the body during human movement, exercise and sport and how these relate to physical activity participation and/or performance (e.g. skill development, physical fitness, adaptations to training).

K8        Philosophical considerations in research and appropriate research methodology, strategy and design to answer research/practice led questions.

K9       Key political, structural and cultural factors which have shaped the levels and types of engagement with – and experiences of - sport amongst diverse populations in varied national and global settings.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

This section covers Cognitive and Practical Skills with the below including both subject-specific cognitive and subject-specific practical skills learning outcomes.

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

S1        Develop pedagogical skills in various sports, games and gymnastic activities.

S2        Critically evaluate pedagogical concepts, theories and philosophies and the impact of these on learning and teaching.

S3        Apply and critique a variety of assessment methods and approaches employed within Sport, Coaching and Physical Education contexts.

S4        Critically analyse their own (and others’) ability to plan, communicate, participate, deliver, evaluate, and reflect on coaching/teaching sessions.

S5        Apply knowledge and understanding of evidence, policy and practice based facts, concepts, principles and theories to critically examine and debate national and global pedagogical, social and health problems and issues.

S6        Apply knowledge and understanding of applied sport science including physical activity and health, principles of training and measurement, performance analysis and fitness testing.

S7        Demonstrate the skills required for a range of awards and NGB recognised qualifications relevant to teaching and coaching.

S8        Apply knowledge of issues around equity and inclusion to appraise current policies and practices in Sport, Physical Activity, Coaching and Physical Education.

S9        Apply a broad range of qualitative and quantitative data collection and/or analysis techniques to research questions relating to social/political aspects of sport, pedagogy (theory or practice), physical activity and health, performance analysis, fitness techniques, skill acquisition, psychology.

S10      Demonstrate proficiency in the use of a variety of online resources, software and technologies to support one’s learning and pedagogical practice.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

See above

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

T1        Work independently and in groups, demonstrating high standards of academic scholarship and conduct to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach end goals and evaluate outcomes.

T2        Develop practical skills relevant to future employability including thinking and decision-making, team working, project management, negotiation and conflict resolution.

T3        Effectively manage time and effort in the organisation of work to ensure independent and pragmatic learning and meet deadlines.

T4        Work effectively in a team by co-operating and negotiating with others, making decisions and resolving issues, difficulties and conflicts, as applicable.

T5        Demonstrate proficiency in Information Technology.

T6        Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative and quantitative data effectively.

T7        Demonstrate communication skills including effective written and oral presentation (individual and in a group) skills, tailored to the audience. 

T8        Identify and critically reflect on a range of literature and information from different sources. 

The full range of intended learning outcomes that will be achieved by students taking the Sport, Coaching and Physical Education programme will be dependent upon which routes they choose to study. In Parts B-C, students have module choice enabling them to tailor their learning; however, the learning outcomes above represent the minimum number that will be achieved by all students regardless of the optional modules selected. Individual module specifications should be consulted for details of the specific knowledge and understanding obtained from optional modules within the programme.

4. Programme structure

Each year 120 credits must be taken. All modules are compulsory in part A. In Part B students undertake a compulsory Research Methods module, two compulsory 20 credit modules in Teaching and Coaching and then select 3 optional modules. In Part C students undertake a compulsory research project (40 credits), at least one module in teaching or coaching and 3 optional modules. Options should be chosen such that there is a balanced weighting of study across the two semesters. 

BSc (Hons) Sport, Coaching and Physical Education 

Part A

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/ Compulsory (C)

PSA706

Academic, Research and Vocational Skills

20

1+2

C

PSA742

Fundamentals of

Teaching Physical Education

20

2

C

PSA741

Fundamentals of Sport Coaching

20

1

C

PSA751

Sport and the Social Sciences

20

1+2

C

PSA761

Kinesiology, Growth and Development

20

1+2

C

PSA762

Fundamentals of Sport and Exercise Science

20

1+2

C

Part B

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/ Compulsory (C)

PSB707

Research Skills and Methodologies  

20

1+2

C

PSB744

The Reflective Practitioner in Physical Education

20

2

C

PSB743

Coaching Process and Practice

20

1

C

PSB752

Sport, Diversity and Social Justice

20

1

O

PSB753

Conceptualising Sport

20

2

O

PSB754

Physical Activity and Health

20

2

O

PSB763

Acquiring Movement Skills

20

1

O

PSB764

Fitness Training and Analysis

20

1+2

O

Part I (for programmes with DPS or DIntS only)

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/ Compulsory (C)

PSI005

International Study Placement (DIntS, non-credit bearing)

n/a

1+2

O

PSI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS, non-credit bearing)

n/a

1+2

O

 

Part C

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/ Compulsory (C)

PSC700

Research Project

40

1+2

C

PSC746

Contemporary Issues in Physical Education

20

2

O*

PSC745

Advanced Sport Coaching

20

1

O*

PSC755

Contemporary Issues in Sport Cultures

20

1+2

O

PSC756

Leadership and Managing Change

20

1+2

O

PSC757

Physical Activity and Health in Practice

20

2

O

PSC765

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education

20

1

O

PSC766

Applied Sports Science: Analysis and Conditioning

20

1+2

O

*Although optional must take a minimum of one of these modules

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and Regulation XI for programmes with DPS/DinTS (if applicable).

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. For this BSc (Hons) degree, the percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%: Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/BSc+DPS/BSc+DIntS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science
Programme code PSUB02
Length of programme 3 years (4 years DPS/DIntS)
UCAS code CX63, C600
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/cx63

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c600

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The principal aim of the programme is to provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding of fundamental and cutting-edge aspects of sport and exercise science as applied to human performance, physical activity, health and well-being. The programme will provide a multi-disciplinary and predominately natural science-based approach to the study of sport and exercise.

Specific programme aims are:    

  • To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of Sport and Exercise Science with particular focus on the core disciplines of physiology, nutrition, biomechanics, motor control, and psychology 
  • To enable students to develop and sustain arguments and solve problems through a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of sport performance, physical activity and health and wellbeing, and to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different audiences 
  • To develop students’ practical, laboratory and field-based skills, enabling them to apply these to performance and health contexts 
  • To provide students with a critical appreciation of the roles and responsibilities of the sport and exercise scientist 
  • To engage students in research and formal scientific inquiry in Sport and Exercise Science  in order to develop their research skills and prepare them for completion of an independent research project 
  • To equip students with intellectual, practical and other transferable skills and attributes for a graduate career and personal success 
  • To promote and provide students with a multi-disciplinary and applied educational experience.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications 

QAA Quality Code http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/AssuringStandardsAndQuality/Pages/The-Quality-Code.aspx 

FHEQ

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/publications/information-and-guidance/publication/?PubID=2718#.WZMlVsuWypp 

The British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES) http://www.bases.org.uk/ 

 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

  K1

Key subject-specific terminology, concepts and models in the core disciplines of physiology, nutrition, biomechanics, motor control, and psychology; 

  K2

Methods, theories and empirical findings related to the study of participants (e.g. athletes, patients and the wider population) in sport and exercise contexts, and how such study informs the performance, health and well-being of stakeholders in such contexts.

  K3

The role of related areas of sport and exercise science and their interrelationships in influencing the professional work of practitioners. 

  K4

Research design (including safety, risk, and ethical considerations), measurement techniques, and the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data including qualitative and quantitative methods.

  K5

The physiological limitations to performance in sport and exercise, and the chronic physiological adaptations (including mechanisms of adaptation) to exercise and training.

  K6

The links between human nutrition, metabolism, performance and health in sport and exercise.

  K7

The mechanics of human motion, especially as related to sporting performance.

  K8

The mechanisms involved in the control of human movement with particular reference to sports movements.

  K9 The psychological and behavioural theories and principles that relate to sport performance and exercise participation.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  C1

Apply knowledge and understanding of essential facts, key concepts, principles and theories to solve problems and debate critical issues within the subject area.

  C2

Critically assess and interpret evidence derived from sport and exercise related enquiry.

  C3

Critically reflect upon approaches to the acquisition, interpretation and analysis of information in a variety of sport and exercise contexts.

  C4

Identify and solve scientific problems in Sport and Exercise Science.

  C5

Collate, critically evaluate and interpret scientific Sport and Exercise Science information and arguments in a coherent and organised way appropriately adapted to a specific type of audience.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  P1

Observe, record and critically evaluate human performance in a range of sport and exercise contexts.

  P2

Apply a broad range of laboratory and field-based practical investigative techniques to the study of sport and exercise, including data collection, data analysis, statistical evaluation, hypotheses formulating and testing.

  P3

Apply health, safety and ethical considerations to sport and exercise experimentation, research and professional practice.

  P4

Plan, design and execute an independent research project related to sport and exercise science under appropriate supervision.

  P5

Critically evaluate and communicate sport and exercise research observations to different audiences.

  P6

Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills appropriate for working in sport and exercise contexts.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical or other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information from library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

4. Programme structure

Each year 120 credits must be taken. All modules are compulsory in Part A. In Part B students undertake the compulsory Research Methods, and Integrated Professional and Applied Skills modules; and then select four optional modules including at least one module from each of the core disciplines of: Physiology and Nutrition; Biomechanics and Motor Control; Sport and Exercise Psychology. In Part C students undertake a compulsory Research Project (40 credits), the Integrated Professional and Applied Skills module; and then select three optional modules from the core disciplines. Options should be chosen such that there is a balanced weighting of study across the two semesters.

Part A - Compulsory Introductory Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA701

Academic Skills and Data Description

20

1&2

PSA703

Integrated, Professional and Applied Skills in Sport and Exercise Science 1

20

1&2

PSA606

Anatomy and Physiology

20

1&2

PSA712

Biochemistry and Cell Biology for Sport and Exercise Science

20

1

PSA721

Introduction to Sport Biomechanics and Kinesiology

20

1&2

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

20

2

 

Part B - Compulsory Degree Modules: 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB702

Research Methods  20 1&2

PSB704

Integrated, Professional and Applied Skills in Sport and Exercise Science 2 20 1&2

Part B - Optional Degree Modules: 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

 

CHOOSE ONE OF BOTH FROM:    

PSB713

Physiology of Exercise and Training 20 1&2
PSB022 Biochemistry of Exercise Nutrition 20 1&2
  CHOOSE ONE OF BOTH FROM:     
PSB722 Sport Biomechanics 20 1&2
PSB723 Motor Control and Motor Learning 20 1&2
  CHOOSE ONE OR BOTH FROM:     
PSB732 Current Themes in Sport and Exercise  Psychology 20 1
PSB733 Expert Performance in Sport 20 2

 

Part I (for programmes with DPS or DIntS only)

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSI005

International Study Placement (DIntS, non-credit bearing)   1&2

PSI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS, non-credit bearing)   1&2

 

Part C - Compulsory Degree Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC700

Research Project 40 1&2

PSC705

Integrated, Professional and Applied Skills in Sport and Exercise Science 3 20 1&2

Part C - Optional Degree Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC715

Physiology of Sport, Exercise and Health 20 1&2

PSC716

Nutrition for Sport, Exercise and Health 20 1&2
PSC724 Advanced Sport Biomechanics 20 1&2
PSC725 Advanced Motor Control of Sport Movements 20 1&2
PSC734 Applied Exercise Psychology 20 1
PSC735 Applied Psychology in Competitive Sport 20 1&2

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and Regulation XI for programmes with DPS/DInts (if applicable).

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. For this BSc (Hons) degree, the percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%: Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

PS BSc (Hons) Sport Management (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS
Programme title Sport Management
Programme code PSUB01
Length of programme 3 years (4 years DPS/DIntS)
UCAS code N222, N281
Admissions criteria

BSc DIS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n281

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n222

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The principal aim of the programme is to provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the complex and varied sport industry combined with knowledge and core skills in business, finance, marketing and management.

Specific programme aims are:    

  • To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of key issues and themes in sport management through specialist study and research. 
  • To provide students with an understanding of the social, economic and political context within which sport management takes place and the sport industry operates. 
  • To develop students’ skills to research, analyse and synthesise scientific information to enable them to develop arguments, critically evaluate material, and conduct an independent piece of research relevant to sport management. 
  • To develop students’ business knowledge and skills in marketing, economics, human resource management, and finance relevant to a career in sport management and the sport industry. 
  • To provide students with opportunities to apply their business knowledge and skills to practical sport management-related activities and situations. 
  • To equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills to develop and critically reflect upon professional practice and their own future personal development.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmark Statement Events, Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism
  • QAA Subject Benchmark Statement Business and Management
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Strategy (Educating for Success)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

K1 sports organisations, the environment in which they operate and their management 

K2 sport, management and leisure provision for a wide-range of stakeholders through critical evaluation of both academic and professional practices relating to policy, planning management and delivery of sporting opportunities 

K3 the importance of the social, economic and political domains to explain the dynamic development and differentiation of sport and leisure in a global society 

K4 the importance of policy, planning and management to the delivery of sport and leisure opportunities 

K5 issues of lifestyle, consumption and culture, and their influence on people’s lives 

K6 the effects of sport, exercise and leisure interventions on individual and special populations 

K7 the fast rate of change in the environment in which sports organisations exist which impacts on the strategy, behaviour, management and sustainability of organisations (e.g. economic, environmental, cultural, ethical, legal and regulatory, political, sociological, digital and technological change).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

C1 reflect critically on the central themes and issues in modules within the programme 

C2 critically assess and interpret evidence from data and text derived from sport management enquiry 

C3 present a reasoned argument to assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and instructional models relevant to sport management 

C4 relate theory to practice in sport management 

C5 review the social, political, economic and physical contexts relevant to sport management.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

P1 plan, design and execute a sustained piece of independent research relevant to sport management 

P2 monitor and evaluate sport and leisure activities in field settings drawing on their business skills and knowledge 

P3 undertake fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment 

P4 apply vocationally relevant concepts to the operation and strategic management of human, financial and physical resources.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

T1 demonstrate people management skills including communication, team building, leadership and motivating others 

T2 demonstrate the ability to generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative and quantitative data effectively 

T3 demonstrate how research leads to evidence-based decision making 

T4 problem solve and engage in critical analysis, identifying, understanding, analysing and addressing problems relevant to managers 

T5 demonstrate commercial acumen showing awareness of key drivers for success, understanding failure and the importance of customer/consumer satisfaction/loyalty 

T6 communicate effectively and network, listen, negotiate, persuade, present arguments and develop contacts 

T7 work independently showing a willingness to accept responsibility, be flexible, resilient and be able to plan, organise and manage time 

T8 demonstrate self-reflection and awareness/sensitivity to diversity 

T9 show innovation, creativity and enterprise and act entrepreneurially to generate, develop and communicate ideas, manage and exploit intellectual property, gain support and deliver successful outcomes.

4. Programme structure

4.1     Part A  - Introductory Modules 

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/

Compulsory (C)

PSA706

Academic, Research and Vocational Skills

20

1+2

C

PSA772

Introduction to Sport

Management

20

1+2

C

PSA771

Critical Perspectives in Sport Management

20

2

C

BSA520

Principles of Marketing for

Sport and Leisure

10

1

C

BSA540

Financial Accounting for Sport

10 1 C

BSA512

The Leisure Market

10

2

C

BSA530

Behaviour in Sporting Organisations

10

2

C

PSA741

Fundamentals of Sport

Coaching

20

1

O

PSA751

Sport and the Social Sciences

20

1+2

O

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.

 4.2     Part B - Degree Modules 

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/

Compulsory (C)

PSB707

Research Skills and Methodologies

20

1+2

C

PSB772

Sport Management in Practice

20

1+2

C

PSB771

Sports Law, Equity and

Inclusion

20

1+2

C

PSB773

Sport Marketing

10

1

C

BSB510

Human Resource Management in Sports

Organisation

10

1

C

BSB522

Economic Analysis of Sport

10

2

C

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10

2

C

PSB743

Coaching Process and

Practice

20

1

O

PSB752

Sport, Diversity and Social

Justice

20

1

O

PSB753

Conceptualising Sport

20

2

O

PSB754

Physical Activity and Health

20

2

O

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester. 

Part I (for programmes with DPS or DIntS only) 

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/ Compulsory (C)

PSI005

International Study Placement (DIntS, non-credit bearing)

n/a

1+2

O

PSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS, non-credit bearing)

n/a

1+2

O

4.3     Part C - Degree Modules 

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

Optional (O)/

Compulsory (C)

PSC700

Research Project

40

1+2

C

PSC771

Sport Policy and Governance

20

1+2

C

PSC772

Strategic Sport Marketing

and Economics

20

1+2

C

PSC773

Strategic Management of

Sports Organisations and Events

20

1+2

C

PSC745

 

Advanced Sport Coaching

 

20

1

O

PSC755

Contemporary Issues in Sport

Cultures

20

1+2

O

PSC756

Leadership and Managing

Change

20

1+2

O

PSC757

Physical Activity and Health in

Practice

20

2

O

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits, with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and Regulation XI for programmes with DPS/DinTS (if applicable).

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. For this BSc (Hons) degree, the percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%: Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Social Psychology (2016-2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society (BPS), for Graduate Membership of the Society (GM) and Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC). 

Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Social Psychology
Programme code PSUB24
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code C880, C88A
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c880

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c88a

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The overarching aim of the BSc Social Psychology programme is to provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding of key and cutting-edge aspects of psychological science.

Within this general aim, curriculum content reflects the need to meet the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and:

  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills for careers in which psychology provides a relevant  foundation;
  • develop a range of research skills for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in the deployment of these skills in the conduct and reporting of an independent piece of research;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychological theory and research, and to relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines in both academic and applied settings;
  • enable students to develop and sustain arguments and solve problems through a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of psychological topics, and to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different audiences; and
  • promote and provide a multi-disciplinary educational experience.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBC curriculum
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The subject benchmark statement for Psychology

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas.

  K1

Social psychology: e.g. social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.

  K2

Cognitive psychology: e.g. perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.

  K3

Individual differences and personality: e.g. abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.

  K4

Developmental psychology: e.g. childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.

  K5

Biological psychology: e.g. biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology.

  K6

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g. the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

  K7

Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

K8

Methods, theories, and empirical findings about social groups, behaviours, communication and social interaction, and relationships; and the contribution of these to psychological research and practice.

K9

Conversation analysis and discursive psychology: e.g. the study of the systematic organisation of talk and social interaction in everyday and institutional settings, and its application to studying and critically examining psychological topics.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  C1

Demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning, and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology.

  C2

Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.

  C3

Search for similarities and general principles in order to detect and evaluate meaningful patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning, and experience.

  C4

Recognise the continuous significance and importance for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and appreciate the complexities their recognition raises.

  C5

Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methods, paradigms, analytic techniques and applications in psychology.

  C6

Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.

C7

Apply social psychological theory and research methods to problems in everyday life and social institutions.

C8

Identify, analyse, compare and describe in detail communicative practices in everyday and institutional social interaction.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  P1

Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a range of settings.

  P2

Make effective use of a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.

  P3

Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative psychological methods.

  P4

Present and evaluate psychological research findings.

  P5

Use a variety of specialist software packages, laboratory and psychometric instruments, and digital data gathering platforms.

  P6

Deploy effective listening skills and communicate psychological concepts, methods, and findings effectively in speech and writing.

  P7

Apply ethical considerations to psychological research and professional practice.

  P8

Conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating appropriate levels of personal planning and project management.

P9

Collect, transcribe and analyse everyday social interaction and present findings effectively.

P10

Design empirical investigations to critically examine social behaviours, practices, contexts or topics.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

T8

Deploy critical judgment in making use of contextual and interpersonal factors that shape behaviour and social interaction.

T9

Recognise the social bases of interpersonal conflict and cooperation and apply these understandings to maximise the effectiveness of individual and group work.

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 credits in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

4.1a    Part A – Compulsory Introductory Modules 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA500

Foundations in Developmental Psychology

10

1

PSA510

Foundations in Qualitative Research Methods

10

1

PSA503

Foundations in Quantitative Research Methods

10

1

PSA508

Foundations in Social Psychology

10

1

SSA155

Social Psychology and Relationships

10

1

PSA501

Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology

10

2

PSA509

Foundations in Cognitive Psychology

10

2

PSA511

Psychology Practicals A

10

2

PSA502

Foundations in Biological Psychology

10

2

SSA157

Academic and Professional Skills for Social Sciences Psychology Students

10

1&2



4.1b     Part A – Optional Introductory Modules

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

 Modular  Weight

Semester

PSA301

Introductory Neuroscience

10

1

SSA001

Identities and Inequalities

10

1

SSA156

Self and Identity

10

1

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology & Social Policy A

10

1

SSA301

Introduction to Communication & Media Studies: Contemporary Trends and Issues

10

1

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B

10

2

SSA002

Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

2

SSA302

Introduction to Communication & Media Studies: Historical Themes and Perspectives

10

2

BSA702

Introduction to Work Psychology

10

2

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

10

2

SSA158

Ideas and Controversies in Psychology

10

2

 

A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

1 or 2

 

4.2a    Part B – Compulsory Degree Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB510

Personality and Individual Differences

10

1

PSB513

Human Cognition

10

1

PSB507

Social Psychology

10

1

PSB508

Developmental Psychology

10

1

SSB165

Social Psychology and Communication

10

1

PSB514

Brain and Behaviour I

10

2

PSB511

Quantitative Research Methods

10

2

PSB512

Psychology Practicals B

10

2

SSB164

Studying Social Interaction

10

2

PSB509

Qualitative Research Methods

10

2

 

4.2b     Part B – Optional Degree Modules – all subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules.

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

BSB711

Psychological Approaches to Human Resource Management

10

1

PSB031

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

10

1

SSB128

Political Psychology

10

1

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

10

1

SSB352

Political Communication

10

1

SSB360

The Media in a Global Context

10

1

SSB023

Religion and Society

10

1

PSB026

Group and Interpersonal Processes in Competitive Sport

10

2

PSB033

Principles of Exercise Psychology

10

2

SSB036

Digital Lives and Society

10

2

SSB175

Psychological Disorders in Society

10

2

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

10

2

BSB710

Leading and Developing Others

10

2

 

A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

1 or 2

 

4.3       Part I (4-year/8-semester programme only)

Candidates pursue ONE of the following streams:

(i)        Placement Stream (DPS)

Candidates will undertake an appropriate psychology-related placement.

(ii)       Study Abroad Stream (DIntS) where applicable

Candidates will study at an approved academic institution overseas.

 

4.4a    Part C – Compulsory Degree Modules 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

SSC199

Project (SP & PwC)

 40

 1&2

SSC171

Advanced Social Psychology

 10

 1

SSC173

Language, Culture and Mind

10

2


4.4b    Part C – Optional Degree Modules – all subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules

60 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

SSC020

Race and Racism 20 1
SSC024 Gender, Sex and Society 20 1
SSC316 Media, Memory and History 20 1
PSC033 Psychology of Coaching and Youth Sport 10 1
PSC301 Advanced Experimental and Qualitative Design and Analysis 20 1
PSC319 Psychology of Eating Behaviour 20 1
PSC321 Psychology of Workplace Health 20 1
SSC130 Social Psychology of Everyday Life 20 1
SSC238 Youth Justice 20 1
SSC357 Producing the News 20 2
BSC720 Behavioural Decision Science 10 2
BSC722 Consumer Behaviour 10 2
PSC036 Applied Exercise Psychology 10 2
PSC311 Clinical Psychology 20 2
PSC315 Psychology and Health 20 2
PSC320 Parenting and Socialisation 20 2
PSC322 Brain and Behaviour II 20 2
  A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director 10 1 or 2

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Psychology (2016 to 2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society (BPS), for Graduate Membership of the Society (GM) and Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC). 

Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Psychology
Programme code PSUB13
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code C800, C801
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c800 

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c801

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The overarching aim of the BSc Psychology programme is to provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding of key and cutting-edge aspects of psychological science.

Within this general aim, curriculum content reflects the need to meet the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and:

  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills for careers in which psychology provides a relevant foundation;
  • develop a range of research skills for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in the deployment of these skills in the conduct and reporting of an independent piece of research;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychological theory and research, and to relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines in both academic and applied settings;
  • enable students to develop and sustain arguments and solve problems through a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of psychological topics, and to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different audiences; and
  • promote and provide a multi-disciplinary educational experience.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBC curriculum
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The subject benchmark statement for Psychology

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas.

 

  K1

Social psychology: e.g. social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.

  K2

Cognitive psychology: e.g. perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.

  K3

Individual differences and personality: e.g. abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.

  K4

Developmental psychology: e.g. childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.

  K5

Biological psychology: e.g. biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology.

  K6

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g. the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

  K7

Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

  K8

The major career pathways along which psychological skills can be professionally developed (including clinical, counselling, health, educational, industrial/organisational, and academic psychology).

  K9 The role of psychology in researching, defining and promoting both physical and mental health and wellbeing.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  C1

Demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology.

  C2

Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.

  C3

Search for similarities and general principles in order to detect and evaluate meaningful patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning, and experience.

  C4

Recognise the continuous significance and importance for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and appreciate the complexities their recognition raises.

  C5

Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methods, paradigms, analytic techniques and applications in psychology.

  C6

Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.

  C7

Construct psychological, psychosocial and neuropsychological hypotheses to account for a range of normal and challenging human behaviours.

  C8 Apply evidence-based principles to the development of policy and practice in a range of applied professional settings.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  P1

Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a range of settings.

  P2

Make effective use of a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.

  P3

Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative psychological methods.

  P4

Present and evaluate psychological research findings.

  P5

Use a variety of specialist software packages, laboratory and psychometric instruments, and digital data gathering platforms.

  P6

Deploy effective listening skills and communicate psychological concepts, methods, and findings effectively in speech and writing.

  P7

Apply ethical considerations to psychological research and professional practice.

  P8

Conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating appropriate levels of personal planning and project management.

  P9

Design an empirical investigation to test a specific theory in relation to, or to identify attributes indicative of normal and pathological psychological states.

  P10 Use and critique a range of laboratory based and ambulatory technologies which capture and quantify aspects of human behaviour.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

  T8

Recognise the value of building on experience, appropriately testing new ideas, and reviewing evidence.

  T9 Apply the practical rigour and intellectual critique required for behavioural experimental methods to a range of applied personal and professional challenges.

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 credits in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

4.1a    Part A – Compulsory Introductory Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA500

Foundations in Developmental Psychology

10

1

PSA510

Foundations in Qualitative Research Methods

10

1

PSA503

Foundations in Quantitative Research Methods

10

1

PSA508

Foundations in Social Psychology

10

1

PSA505

Academic & Professional Skills for Psychology

10

1

PSA501

Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology

10

2

PSA509

Foundations in Cognitive Psychology

10

2

PSA511

Psychology Practicals A

10

2

PSA502

Foundations in Biological Psychology

10

2

PSA302

Professions in Psychology

10

2

 

4.1b     Part A – Optional Introductory Modules:

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA301

Introductory Neuroscience

10

1

SSA156

Self and Identity

10

1

SSA155

Social Psychology and Relationships

10

1

BSA702

Introduction to Work Psychology

10

2

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

20

2

SSA158

Ideas and Controversies in Psychology

10

2

 

A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

1 or 2

 

4.2a    Part B – Compulsory Degree Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB510

Personality and Individual Differences

10

1

PSB513

Human Cognition

10

1

PSB507

Social Psychology

10

1

PSB508

Developmental Psychology

10

1

PSB514

Brain and Behaviour I

10

2

PSB511

Quantitative Research Methods

10

2

PSB512

Psychology Practicals B

10

2

PSB509

Qualitative Research Methods

10

2

 

4.2b    Part B – Optional Degree Modules all subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules. 

40 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

BSB711

Psychological Approaches to Human Resource Management 10 1
PSB031 Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport 10 1
SSB128 Political Psychology 10 1
SSB165 Social Psychology and Communication 10 1
BSB710 Leading and Developing Others 10 2
SSB175 Psychological Disorders in Society 10 2
PSB026 Group and Interpersonal Processes in Competitive Sport 10 2
PSB033 Principles of Exercise Psychology 10 2
SSB164 Studying Social Interaction 10 2
  A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director 10 1 or 2

 

4.3       Part I (4-year/8-semester programme only)

Candidates pursue ONE of the following streams:

(i)        Placement Stream (DPS)

Candidates will undertake an appropriate psychology-related placement.

(ii)       Study Abroad Stream (DIntS) where applicable

Candidates will study at an approved academic institution overseas.

 

4.4a    Part C – Compulsory Degree Modules, choose one of the following project modules (selection subject to having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules)

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC300

Project 

40

1&2

SSC199

Project

40

1&2 

 

4.4b    Part C - Optional Degree Modules all subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules. 

80 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

 PSC033

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education

10 

 PSC301

Advanced Experimental and Qualitative Design & Analysis 

20 

 PSC319 Psychology of Eating Behaviour  20 
 PSC321 Psychology of Workplace Health  20 
 SSC130 Social Psychology of Everyday Life  20 
 SSC171 Advanced Social Psychology  10 
 SSC020 Race and Racism  20 
 SSC024 Gender, Sex and Society  20 
 BSC720 Behavioural Decision Science  10 
 BSC722 Consumer Behaviour  10 
 PSC036 Applied Exercise Psychology  10 
 PSC311 Clinical Psychology  20 
 PSC315 Psychology and Health  20 
 PSC320 Parenting and Socialisation  20 
 PSC322 Brain and Behaviour II  20 
 SSC173 Language Culture and Mind  10 
  A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director 10  1 or 2 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Business Psychology

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society (BPS), for Graduate Membership of the Society (GM) and Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC). 

Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Business Psychology
Programme code PSUB19
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code C8N0, C8N1
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c8n0

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c8n1

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The overarching aim of the Business Psychology programmes is to provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding of key and cutting-edge aspects of psychological science.

Within this general aim, curriculum content reflects the need to meet the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and:

  • enable students to use their accumulated knowledge and skills in psychology to understand and enhance performance and well-being in work settings;
  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills for careers in which psychology provides a relevant  foundation;
  • develop a range of research skills for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in the deployment of these skills in the conduct and reporting of an independent piece of research;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychological theory and research, and to relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines in both academic and applied settings;
  • enable students to develop and sustain arguments and solve problems through a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of psychological topics, and to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different audiences; and
  • promote and provide a multi-disciplinary educational experience.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBC curriculum
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The subject benchmark statement for Psychology
  • The subject benchmark statement for General Business and Management

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas.

  K1

Social psychology: e.g. social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.

  K2

Cognitive psychology: e.g. perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.

  K3

Individual differences and personality: e.g. abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.

  K4

Developmental psychology: e.g. childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.

  K5

Biological psychology: e.g. biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology.

  K6

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g. the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

  K7

Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

K8

The behaviour, attitudes, health, decision-making and development of people in work settings.

K9

The principles, theories and practices of management and business operations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  C1

Demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning, and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology.

  C2

Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.

  C3

Search for similarities and general principles in order to detect and evaluate meaningful patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning, and experience.

  C4

Recognise the continuous significance and importance for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and appreciate the complexities their recognition raises.

  C5

Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methods, paradigms, analytic techniques and applications in psychology.

  C6

Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.

C7

Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply theory and research in psychology to business and management settings.

C8

Analyse business and management decisions and strategies, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  P1

Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a range of settings.

  P2

Make effective use of a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.

  P3

Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative psychological methods.

  P4

Present and evaluate psychological research findings.

  P5

Use a variety of specialist software packages, laboratory and psychometric instruments, and digital data gathering platforms.

  P6

Deploy effective listening skills and communicate psychological concepts, methods, and findings effectively in speech and writing.

  P7

Apply ethical considerations to psychological research and professional practice.

  P8

Conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating appropriate levels of personal planning and project management.

P9

Perform effectively within a team environment, displaying appropriate skills including leadership and feedback-giving and receiving.

P10

Communicate about the applications of psychology and related disciplines to business contexts in ways which non-specialists can understand.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

T8

Deploy psychological skills and knowledge to manage people (including self) and business operations effectively.

T9

Display a positive attitude to change with a desire for excellence and constructive ideas for improvement.

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 credits in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

4.1a    Part A – Compulsory Introductory Modules 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA500

Foundations in Developmental Psychology

10

1

PSA510

Foundations in Qualitative Research Methods

10

1

PSA503

Foundations in Quantitative Research Methods

10

1

PSA508

Foundations in Social Psychology

10

1

PSA505

Academic & Professional Skills for Psychology

10

1

PSA501

Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology

10

2

PSA509

Foundations in Cognitive Psychology

10

2

PSA511

Psychology Practicals A

10

2

PSA502

Foundations in Biological Psychology

10

2

BSA702

Introduction to Work Psychology

10

2

 

4.1b     Part A – Optional Introductory Modules

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme::

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

   Semester

BSA050

Introduction to Management

10

1

BSA055

Principles of Marketing

10

1

BSA052

Sociology of Work

10

2

BSA053

Organisations in the International Context

10

2

BSA057

The Marketing Mix

10

2

 

A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

1 or 2

 

4.2a    Part B – Compulsory Degree Modules 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB510

Personality and Individual Differences

10

1

PSB513

Human Cognition

10

1

PSB507

Social Psychology

10

1

PSB508

Developmental Psychology

10

1

BSB711

Psychological Approaches to Human Resource Management

10

1

BSB710

Leading and Developing Others

10

2

PSB514

Brain and Behaviour I

10

2

PSB511

Quantitative Research Methods

10

2

PSB512

Psychology Practicals B

10

2

PSB509

Qualitative Research methods

10

2

 

4.2b     Part B – Optional Degree Modules – all subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules.

20 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

BSB035

Sales Management

10

1

BSB046

Organisation Studies

10

1

BSB530

Accounting for Business

10

1

BSB030

Marketing

10

1

BSB087

Vocational Psychology

10

2

BSB105

Brand Management

10

2

BSB150

Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility

10

2

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10

2

 

A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director

10

1 or 2

 

4.3       Part I (4-year/8-semester programme only)

Candidates pursue ONE of the following streams:

(i)        Placement Stream (DPS)

Candidates will undertake an appropriate psychology-related placement.

(ii)       Study Abroad Stream (DIntS) where applicable

Candidates will study at an approved academic institution overseas.

 

4.4a    Part C – Compulsory Degree Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

BSC721

Project (BP) 40 1&2

PSC321

Psychology of Workplace Health 20 1

BSC720

Behavioural Decision Science 10 2

BSC722

Consumer Behaviour 10 2

 

4.4b    Part C – Optional Degree Modules – all subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules

40 credits from optional modules listed in the table below and may include 10-credits from the University-wide Language Programme:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

BSC105

International Human Resource Management 10 1

BSC115

International Marketing 10 1

BSC522

Entrepreneurship and Innovation 10 1

PSC301

Advanced Experimental and Qualitative Design and Analysis 20 1

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life 20 1

ISC027

Information and Knowledge Management 10 1

PSC322

Brain and Behaviour II 20 2

BSC059

Business and Entrepreneurialism in post-conflict spaces 10 2

BSC080

Analysing Careers 10 2

BSC124

Marketing Communications 10 2

PSC315

Psychology and Health 20 2
  A module from the University-Wide Language Programme, subject to approval by Programme Director 10 1 or 2

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Psychology

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society (BPS), for Graduate Membership of the Society (GM) and Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC). 

Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Psychology
Programme code PSUB15
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code C8C6, C86C
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c8c6 

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c86c

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The overarching aim of the BSc Sport and Exercise Psychology programme is to provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding of key and cutting-edge aspects of psychological science through five integrated but distinct undergraduate pathways.

Within this general aim, curriculum content reflects the need to meet the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and:

  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills for careers in which psychology provides a relevant foundation with an emphasis on sport and exercise content;
  • develop a range of research skills for investigating experience and behaviour within sport and exercise context, culminating in the deployment of these skills in the conduct and reporting of an independent piece of research;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychological theory and research, and to relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines in both academic and applied settings;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychology theory and research, and to apply this perspective to real world settings, including sport and exercise contexts; and
  • promote and provide a multi-disciplinary educational experience.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBC curriculum
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The subject benchmark statement for Psychology
  • The subject benchmark statement for Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas.

  K1

Social psychology: e.g. social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.

  K2

Cognitive psychology: e.g. perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.

  K3

Individual differences and personality: e.g. abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.

  K4

Developmental psychology: e.g. childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.

  K5

Biological psychology: e.g. biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology.

  K6

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g. the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

  K7

Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

  K8

Methods, theories and empirical findings related to the study of participants (e.g. athletes, coaches, parents, support staff) and their behaviour in sport and exercise contexts; and how such study informs the performance and well-being of stakeholders in such contexts.

  K9

The role of cognate areas of sport science in influencing the professional work of the practitioner, including the development of relationships in sport and exercise settings.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  C1

Demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning, and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology.

  C2

Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.

  C3

Search for similarities and general principles in order to detect and evaluate meaningful patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning, and experience.

  C4

Recognise the continuous significance and importance for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and appreciate the complexities their recognition raises.

  C5

Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methods, paradigms, analytic techniques and applications in psychology.

  C6

Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.

  C7

Apply knowledge of social psychological, organisational, cognitive-behavioural and humanistic approaches to an understanding of human behaviour in sport and exercise contexts.

  C8

Recognise and identify the role of cognate disciplines of sport and exercise science in informing and formulating practical work with sport and exercise participants.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  P1

Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a range of settings.

  P2

Make effective use of a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.

  P3

Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative psychological methods.

  P4

Present and evaluate psychological research findings.

  P5

Use a variety of specialist software packages, laboratory and psychometric instruments, and digital data gathering platforms.

  P6

Deploy effective listening skills and communicate psychological concepts, methods, and findings effectively in speech and writing.

  P7

Apply ethical considerations to psychological research and professional practice.

  P8

Conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating appropriate levels of personal planning and project management.

  P9

Collect and interpret interview, survey and/or observational data when studying participants in various sport and exercise contexts.

  P10

Demonstrate effective interpersonal skills when working with sport and exercise clients.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

  T8

Identify contextual, intrapersonal and interpersonal factors that shape behaviour and social interaction in sport and exercise settings

  T9

Utilise a variety of psychological principles to contribute to the performance and wellbeing of others in non-sport and exercise domains.

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 credits in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

4.1    Part A – Compulsory Introductory Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA500

Foundations in Developmental Psychology  10 
PSA510 Foundations in Qualitative Research Methods  10 
PSA503 Foundations in Quantitative Research Methods  10
PSA508 Foundations in Social Psychology  10 
PSA507 Academic & Professional Skills for Sport and Exercise Psychology  20 
PSA501 Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology  10 
PSA509 Foundations in Cognitive Psychology  10 
PSA511 Psychology Practicals A  10 
PSA502 Foundations in Biological Psychology  10 
PSA026 Foundations in Sport and Exercise Psychology  20 

 

4.2a    Part B – Compulsory Degree Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB510

Personality and Individual Differences  10 

PSB507

Social Psychology 

10 
PSB513 Human Cognition  10
PSB508 Developmental Psychology  10 
PSB031 Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport  10 
PSB514 Brain and Behaviour I  10
PSB511 Quantitative Research Methods  10 
PSB509 Qualitative Research Methods  10
PSB512 Psychology Practicals B  10 
PSB026 Group and Interpersonal Processes in Competitive Sport  10 
PSB033 Principles of Exercise Psychology  10 

 

4.2b    Part B – Optional Degree Modules subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules. 

10 credits from optional modules listed in the table below: 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

BSB711

Psychological Approaches to Human Resource Management  10 

SSB128

Political Psychology 

10 

 

4.3       Part I (4-year/8-semester programme only)

Candidates pursue ONE of the following streams:

(i)        Placement Stream (DPS)

Candidates will undertake an appropriate psychology-related placement.

(ii)       Study Abroad Stream (DIntS) where applicable

Candidates will study at an approved academic institution overseas.

 

4.4a    Part C – Compulsory Degree Modules:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC300

Project 

40 

1&2 

PSC033

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education 

10 

PSC035

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence 

10 

PSC034 Sport and Psychology in Action  10 
PSC036 Applied Exercise Psychology  10 

 

4.4b    Part C - Optional Degree Modules all subject to confirmation, availability and having taken appropriate pre-requisite modules. 

40 credits from optional modules listed in the table below:

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSC301

Advanced Experimental and Qualitative Design & Analysis 

20 

PSC319

Psychology of Eating Behaviour 

20 

PSC321

Psychology of Workplace Health 

20 

SSC130 Social Psychology of Everyday Life  20 
BSC720 Behavioural Decision Science  10 
BSC722 Consumer Behaviour 10 
PSC311 Clinical Psychology  20 
PSC315 Psychology and Health  20 
PSC320 Parenting and Socialisation  20 
PSC322 Brain and Behaviour II  20 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology (2015 to 2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society (BPS), for Graduate Membership of the Society (GM) and Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC). 

Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology
Programme code PSUB21
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code C8M9, C8M0
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c8m9

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c8m0

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The overarching aim of the Psychology with Criminology Programme is to provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding of key and cutting-edge aspects of psychological science.

Within this general aim, curriculum content reflects the need to meet the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and:

  • equip students with a thorough, theoretical and evidence-based understanding of the connections between individual behaviour, the law, social norms and the criminal justice system
  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills for careers in which psychology provides a relevant foundation;
  • develop a range of research skills for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in the deployment of these skills in the conduct and reporting of an independent piece of research;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychological theory and research, and to relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines in both academic and applied settings;
  • enable students to develop and sustain arguments and solve problems through a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of psychological topics, and to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different audiences; and
  • promote and provide a multi-disciplinary educational experience.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBC curriculum
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The subject benchmark statement for Psychology 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas.

  K1

Social psychology: e.g. social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.

  K2

Cognitive psychology: e.g. perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.

  K3

Individual differences and personality: e.g. abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.

  K4

Developmental psychology: e.g. childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.

  K5

Biological psychology: e.g. biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology.

  K6

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g. the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

  K7

Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

  K8

The main theoretical approaches within criminology and contemporary and historic debates related to the role of biological and social/contextual bases of behaviour in psychological and criminological theory.

  K9

An understanding of the nature of crime and how relevant agencies and agents respond to it.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  C1

Demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning, and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology.

  C2

Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.

  C3

Search for similarities and general principles in order to detect and evaluate meaningful patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning, and experience.

  C4

Recognise the continuous significance and importance for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and appreciate the complexities their recognition raises.

  C5

Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methods, paradigms, analytic techniques and applications in psychology.

  C6

Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.

  C7

Critically evaluate competing theories and explanations for criminological and social problems.

  C8

Apply criminological theory and research to problems and questions in criminology.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  P1

Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a range of settings.

  P2

Make effective use of a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.

  P3

Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative psychological methods.

  P4

Present and evaluate psychological research findings.

  P5

Use a variety of specialist software packages, laboratory and psychometric instruments, and digital data gathering platforms.

  P6

Deploy effective listening skills and communicate psychological concepts, methods, and findings effectively in speech and writing.

  P7

Apply ethical considerations to psychological research and professional practice.

  P8

Conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating appropriate levels of personal planning and project management.

  P9

Analyse and assess criminological findings methodologically and communicate information about them.

  P10

Use appropriate analytical methods and research tools in relation to criminological and social problems; including quantitative, qualitative and evaluative techniques.

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

  T8

Interpret and apply principles of social and criminal justice to the construction of effective written and spoken arguments.

  T9

Deploy critical judgment in recognizing how criminological insights are informed by psychology.

 

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 credits in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules. Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters. Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

4.1    Part A – Compulsory Introductory Modules. 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA500

Foundations in Developmental Psychology 10 1
PSA510 Foundations in Qualitative Research Methods 10 1
PSA503 Foundations in Quantitative Research Methods 10 1
PSA508 Foundations in Social Psychology 10 1
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10 1
SSA157 Academic and Professional Skills for Social Sciences Psychology students 10 1&2
PSA501 Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology 10 2
PSA509 Foundations in Cognitive Psychology 10 2
PSA511 Psychology Practicals A 10 2
PSA502 Foundations in Biological Psychology 10 2
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10 2
SSA206 Crime and Social Welfare 10 2

 

4.2    Part B – Compulsory Degree Modules. Applies to students entering Part B in 2019/20

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB510

Personality and Individual Differences  10 
PSB513 Human Cognition  10
PSB507 Social Psychology  10 
PSB508 Developmental Psychology 10
SSB201 Criminological Theory 20 
PSB514 Brain and Behaviour I  10 
PSB511 Quantitative Research Methods 10 
PSB509 Qualitative Research Methods 10 

PSB512

Psychology Practicals B  10 
SSB211 The Criminal Justice System in England & Wales 20 

  

4.3       Part I (4-year/8-semester programme only)

Candidates pursue ONE of the following streams:

(i)        Placement Stream (DPS)

Candidates will undertake an appropriate psychology-related placement.

(ii)       Study Abroad Stream (DIntS) where applicable

Candidates will study at an approved academic institution overseas.

 

4.4a    Part C – Compulsory Degree Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

SSC199

Project

40

1&2

SSC171

Advanced Social Psychology

10 

SSC173

Language, Culture and Mind

10

2

SSC210

Rehabilitation and recovery

20

 

4.4b    Part C – Optional Degree Modules

Optional modules (40 credits) At least 20 credits must be chosen from group (i). The remaining 20 credits can be chosen from either group (i) or group (ii):

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

Group (i)

SSC238 Youth Justice 20 1
SSC220 Crime Prevention  20 1
SSC138 Forensic Psychology 20 2
SSC211 Criminal Justice System in England and Wales 20 2
Group (ii)
PSC301 Advanced Experimental and Qualitative Design & Analysis 20 1
PSC321 Psychology of Workplace Health 20 1
SSC130 Social Psychology of Everyday Life 20 1
BSC720 Behavioural Decision Science 10 2
BSC722 Consumer Behaviour 10 2
PSC311 Clinical Psychology 20 2
PSC315 Psychology and Health 20 2
PSC320 Parenting and Socialisation 20 2
PSC322 Brain and Behaviour II 20 2

Note: Students wishing to qualify for fast track Probational Office Training PQuiP must take module SSC211

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society (BPS), for Graduate Membership of the Society (GM) and Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC). 

Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Psychology with Criminology
Programme code PSUB21
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code C8M9, C8M0
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c8m9 

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/c8m0

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The overarching aim of the BSc Psychology with Criminology Programme is to provide a comprehensive and coherent understanding of key and cutting-edge aspects of psychological science.

 Within this general aim, curriculum content reflects the need to meet the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and:

  •  equip students with a thorough, theoretical and evidence-based understanding of the connections between individual behaviour, the law, social norms and the criminal justice system
  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills for careers in which psychology provides a relevant foundation;
  • develop a range of research skills for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in the deployment of these skills in the conduct and reporting of an independent piece of research;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychological theory and research, and to relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines in both academic and applied settings;
  • enable students to develop and sustain arguments and solve problems through a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of psychological topics, and to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different audiences; and
  • promote and provide a multi-disciplinary educational experience.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBC curriculum
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The subject benchmark statement for Psychology

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas.

  K1

Social psychology: e.g. social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.

  K2

Cognitive psychology: e.g. perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.

  K3

Individual differences and personality: e.g. abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.

  K4

Developmental psychology: e.g. childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.

  K5

Biological psychology: e.g. biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology.

  K6

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g. the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

  K7

Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

  K8

The main theoretical approaches within criminology and contemporary and historic debates related to the role of biological and social/contextual bases of behaviour in psychological and criminological theory.

  K9

An understanding of the nature of crime and how relevant agencies and agents respond to it.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  C1

Demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning, and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology.

  C2

Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.

  C3

Search for similarities and general principles in order to detect and evaluate meaningful patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning, and experience.

  C4

Recognise the continuous significance and importance for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and appreciate the complexities their recognition raises.

  C5

Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methods, paradigms, analytic techniques and applications in psychology.

  C6

Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.

  C7

Critically evaluate competing theories and explanations for criminological and social problems.

  C8

Apply criminological theory and research to problems and questions in criminology.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  P1

Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a range of settings.

  P2

Make effective use of a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.

  P3

Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative psychological methods.

  P4

Present and evaluate psychological research findings.

  P5

Use a variety of specialist software packages, laboratory and psychometric instruments, and digital data gathering platforms.

  P6

Deploy effective listening skills and communicate psychological concepts, methods, and findings effectively in speech and writing.

  P7

Apply ethical considerations to psychological research and professional practice.

  P8

Conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating appropriate levels of personal planning and project management.

  P9

Analyse and assess criminological findings methodologically and communicate information about them.

  P10

Use appropriate analytical methods and research tools in relation to criminological and social problems; including quantitative, qualitative and evaluative techniques.

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

  T8

Interpret and apply principles of social and criminal justice to the construction of effective written and spoken arguments.

  T9

Deploy critical judgment in recognizing how criminological insights are informed by psychology.

 

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 credits in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules. Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

4.1a    Part A – Compulsory Introductory Modules 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSA500

Foundations in Developmental Psychology 10 1

PSA510

Foundations in Qualitative Research Methods 10 1
PSA503 Foundations in Quantitative Research Methods 10 1
PSA508 Foundations in Social Psychology 10 1
SSA201 Introducing Criminology 10 1
SSA157 Academic and Professional Skills for Social Sciences Psychology students 10 1
PSA501 Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology 10 2
PSA509 Foundations in Cognitive Psychology 10 2
PSA511 Psychology Practicals A 10 2
PSA502 Foundations in Biological Psychology 10 2
SSA202 Understanding Social Policy 10 2
SSA206 Crime and Social Welfare 10 2

 

4.2a    Part B – Compulsory Degree Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB510

Personality and Individual Differences 10 1
PSB513 Human Cognition 10 1
PSB507 Social Psychology 10 1
PSB508 Developmental Psychology 10 1
SSB201 Criminological Theory 20 1
PSB514 Brain and Behaviour I 10 2
PSB511 Quantitative Research Methods 10 2
PSB512 Psychology Practicals B 10 2
PSB509 Qualitative Research Methods 10 2
SSB211 The Criminal Justice System in England & Wales 20 2


Note:  Students wishing to qualify for fast track Probational Office Training PQuiP must take module SSB211

 

4.3       Part I (4-year/8-semester programme only)

Candidates pursue ONE of the following streams:

(i)        Placement Stream (DPS)

Candidates will undertake an appropriate psychology-related placement.

(ii)       Study Abroad Stream (DIntS) where applicable

Candidates will study at an approved academic institution overseas.

 

 4.4a Part C - Compulsory degree modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

SSC199

Project 40 1 & 2
SSC171 Advanced Social Psychology 10 1
SSC210 Rehabilitation and Recovery 20 2
SSC173 Language, Culture and Mind 10 2

 

4.4b Part C - Optional Degree Modules

Optional modules (40 credits). At least 20 credits must be chosen from group (i). The remaining 20 credits can be chosen from either group (i) or group (ii):

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

Group (i)

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

1

SSC138

Forensic Psychology 

20

2

SSC239

Green Criminology: Environmental Crimes and Harms

20

2

SSC203

Operational Policing

20

2

Group (ii)

PSC301

Advanced Experimental and Qualitative Design & Analysis

20

1

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

1

BSC720

Behavioural Decision Science

20

2

BSC722

Consumer Psychology

10

2

PSC311

Clinical Psychology

20

2

PSC315

Psychology and Health

20

2

PSB320

Parenting and Socialisation

20

2

PSC322

Brain and Behaviour II

20

2

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Psychology with Communication (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/BSc+DIntS/BSc+DPS
Programme title BSc (Hons) Psychology with Communication
Programme code PSUB23
Length of programme BSc – 3 years full-time
BSc with placement – 4 years full-time
UCAS code CP83, C8P3
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - 

BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS - 

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

Overall, this Programme seeks to give the student a thorough grounding in two complementary ways of understanding the human in society: through a consideration of people's internal processes and social relations (Psychology) and through connections between people via text, image and speech (Communication). While both disciplines have a large hinterland   of theory and research the outer bounds of which have little in common, certain topics are core to both: mechanisms of perception; theories of language and speech; social influence; interpersonal communication; social interaction; the role of media in society; understanding representation; and the use of both quantitative and qualitative research methods.

 With this general aim, curriculum content reflects the need to meet the programme standards for the Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and:

  • equip students with intellectual, practical and transferable skills for careers in which psychology provides a relevant foundation;
  • develop a range of research skills for investigating experience and behaviour, culminating in the deployment of these skills in the conduct and reporting of an independent piece of research;
  • foster a constructive, critical approach to the evaluation of psychological theory and research, and to relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines in both academic and applied settings;
  • enable students to develop and sustain arguments and solve problems through a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of psychological topics, and to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different audiences; 
  • promote and provide a multi-disciplinary educational experience
  • to equip students with a thorough, theoretical and evidence-based understanding of how communication plays a vital role in the relationships between individuals, groups and commercial and cultural agents

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • British Psychological Society GBC curriculum
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The subject benchmark statement for Psychology
  • The subject benchmark statement for Communication, Media, Film and Culture Studies

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas.

  K1

Social psychology: e.g. social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.

  K2

Cognitive psychology: e.g. perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.

  K3

Individual differences and personality: e.g. abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.

  K4

Developmental psychology: e.g. childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.

  K5

Biological psychology: e.g. biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, socio-biology and evolutionary psychology.

  K6

Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g. the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.

  K7

Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

  K8

The main theoretical approaches to understanding communication and media, and contemporary and historic debates related to the relation between theories of psychology and communication.

  K9

The nature of communication and how relevant agencies and actors use it.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  C1

Demonstrate evidence-based scientific reasoning, and make critical judgements about arguments and primary source material in psychology.

  C2

Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.

  C3

Search for similarities and general principles in order to detect and evaluate meaningful patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning, and experience.

  C4

Recognise the continuous significance and importance for psychology of contextual, interpersonal and cultural influences, and appreciate the complexities their recognition raises.

  C5

Examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methods, paradigms, analytic techniques and applications in psychology.

  C6

Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.

  C7

Critically evaluate competing theories and explanations for the phenomena of communication.

  C8

Apply communication theory and research to problems and questions in communication and media.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  P1

Observe, record and give a systematic account of human behaviour in a range of settings.

  P2

Make effective use of a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.

  P3

Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative psychological methods.

  P4

Present and evaluate psychological research findings.

  P5

Use a variety of specialist software packages, laboratory and psychometric instruments, and digital data gathering platforms.

  P6

Deploy effective listening skills and communicate psychological concepts, methods, and findings effectively in speech and writing.

  P7

Apply ethical considerations to psychological research and professional practice.

  P8

Conduct and report an empirically-based research project under appropriate supervision, demonstrating appropriate levels of personal planning and project management.

  P9

Analyse and assess findings about communication and report information about them.

  P10

Use appropriate analytical methods and reserach tools in relation to communication, including quantitative and qualitative techniques.

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  T1

Generate, organise, analyse and interpret qualitative, numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.

  T2

Demonstrate computer literacy with respect to relevant and widely used word-processing, database and analytic software packages and resources.

  T3

Use electronic and other resources to search for, identify and organise information in library books, journals, and appropriate online sources.

  T4

Work independently and in groups to solve problems, find alternative solutions, reach common goals and evaluate outcomes.

  T5

Deploy critical judgements and evaluations to arrive at supported conclusions.

  T6

Communicate effectively to a range of audiences using a range of media.

  T7

Learn independently and pragmatically and take responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

  T8

Interpret and apply principles of communication to the construction of effective written and spoken arguments.

  T9

Deploy critical judgment in recognizing how communication is informed by psychology.

 

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 credits in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules. Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters. All modules subject to confirmation, availability and having taken the appropriate pre-requisite modules (where applicable)

4.1a    Part A – Compulsory Introductory Modules for all Programmes

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

SSA301

Introduction to Comm. & Media Studies A

10

1

SSA307

Constructing Meaning: Texts and Audiences 10 1
PSA503 Foundations in Quantitative Research Methods 10 1
PSA508 Foundations in Social Psychology 10 1
PSA510 Foundations in Qualitative Research Methods 10 1
PSA500 Foundations in Developmental Psychology 10 1
PSA501 Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology 10 2
PSA502 Foundations in Biological Psychology 10 2
SSA157 Academic & Professional Skills for Social Sciences Psychology students 10 1
PSA509 Foundations in Cognitive Psychology 10 2
PSA511 Psychology Practicals A 10 2
SSA160 Language in Society 10 2

 

4.2a    Part B – Compulsory Degree Modules 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

PSB513

Human Cognition 10 1
PSB508 Developmental Psychology 10 1
PYB204 Personality and Individual Differences 10 1
SSB165 Social Psychology and Communication 10 1
PSB507 Social Psychology 10 1
SSB132 Analysing Language: Theory and Method 10 1
PSB511 Quantitative Research Methods 10 2
PSB512 Psychology Practicals B 10 2
PSB514 Brain and Behaviour I 10 2
PSB509 Qualitative Research Methods 10 2
SSB133 Group and Intergroup Communication and Conflict 10 2
SSB164 Social Interaction  10 

  

4.3       Part I (4-year/8-semester programme only)

Candidates pursue ONE of the following streams:

(i)        Placement Stream (DPS)

Candidates will undertake an appropriate psychology-related placement.

(ii)       Study Abroad Stream (DIntS) where applicable

Candidates will study at an approved academic institution overseas.

 

4.4a    Part C – Compulsory Degree Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

SSC199

Project

40

1&2

SSC171

Advanced Social Psychology

10 

SSC173

Language, Culture and Mind

10

2

SSC320

Presenting Media Debates

10 

 

4.4b    Part C – Optional Degree Modules

Optional modules (50 credits) At least 20 credits must be chosen from group (ii). The remaining 30 credits can be chosen from either group (ii) or group (iii):

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester

Group (ii)

SSC136 Media, Memory and History  20 1
SSC317 Critical Viewings: Documentary 10 1
SSC318 Critical Viewings: Television 10 2
SSC357 Producing the News 20 2
Group (iii)
SSC130 Social Psychology of Everyday Life 20 
PSC321 Psychology of Workplace Health 20 
PSC301 Advanced Experimental and Qualitative Design & Analysis 20 
BSC720 Behavioural Decision Science 10
BSC722 Consumer Behaviour  10 
PSC315 Psychology and Health  20 
PSC320 Parenting and Socialisation  20 
PSC311 Clinical Psychology 20



5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

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