Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) 3D Design: New Practice Nanyang

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)
Programme title 3D Design: New Practice
Programme code NYUB35
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is two semesters on a full time basis
UCAS code n/a
Admissions criteria

Direct entry to the final year is available to students who successfully complete the Diploma course in 3D Design at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (Singapore). Offers are made on the basis of interview, portfolio and an IELTS English Language score of 6.5 or equivalent. Other qualifications and experience will be considered on an individual basis.

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To develop intellectually stimulating learning through the study and practice of 3D craft and design.
  • To foster interdisciplinary debate through critical thinking, making and writing.
  • To develop and utilise a range of methodologies and skills, including established and emerging studio techniques and apply relevant contextual and theoretical knowledge.
  • To recognise the significance of contemporary 3D craft and design within the global arena and marketplace.
  • To encourage students to challenge disciplinary boundaries through innovation, self-reflection and contextualisation.
  • To provide a high quality honours programme to create a confident, independent and employable graduate.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Art and Design
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The QAA Policy Statement on a structured and supported process for personal development

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme engages with a broad range of interests on the basis that professional practitioners within the field of 3Dimensional design benefit from expertise in diverse media and techniques. The nature of this programme provides a practical and reflective experience of the subject and a rounded knowledge and understanding that helps students determine their role as designers and aid their professional development in a competitive globally led environment.

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Understand the importance of developing new and traditional skills to facilitate in a variety of workshop processes and studio methods and to place these in the context of current social and educational developments in society and the education environment.
  • Articulate a range of contexts – cultural, social and theoretical – demonstrated through production of 3D design work and making skills.
  • Articulate, through project requirements; the creative possibilities of form making in relation to a variety of methodologies.
  • Appreciate the potential for a creative relationship with industry from manufacturers to gallery outlets, at various levels of the market from retail to the specific requirements of an individual.
  • Demonstrate conceptual underpinning and resolution of a variety of project challenges.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Initiate their studio and workshop practice appropriate to specific project briefings and the nature of their enquiry.
  • Demonstrate a broad and comparative understanding of their discipline and apply a suitable methodology to realise their creative goals.
  • Articulate a reasoned response to critical analysis and identify issues for further research, both theoretical and applied from an international perspective.
  • Develop the requirements of a project brief through confident decision-making regarding material, processes and technique.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate skill in developing ideas visually through developmental drawing to presentation.
  • Exploit a variety of materials, fabrication methods, manufacturing techniques and processes.
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of quality relative to means of production.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate information technology skills in word processing, and the appropriate computer software applications with which to develop design and practice.
  • Manage self-learning and be able to apply working methods relative to the various of challenges within contemporary 3D design practice.
  • Communicate ideas succinctly and coherently, verbally and through written and visual aids.
  • Accurately communicate requests regarding technical assistance, workshop procedure and safe working practice.
  • Appreciate the value of diversity of language and culture.

4. Programme structure

Part C - Degree Modules

 

4.1    Semester 1

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight:60)

 

Code

Title

weight

Sem

Status

NYC310

Consolidating Interests

30

1

Compulsory

NYC500

Art and  Design Dissertation

30

1 & 2

Compulsory

 

 

4.2    Semester 2

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight:60)

 

Code

Title

weight

Sem

Status

NYC311

3D Design Major Project

60

2

Compulsory

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

  • in order to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in part C.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment.

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if;

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in NYC311

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level module assessments.

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) Fine Art (Nanyang)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

n/a

Final award BA (Hons)
Programme title Fine Art
Programme code NYUB34
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is two semesters on a full time basis
UCAS code n/a
Admissions criteria

Direct entry to the final year is available to students who successfully complete the Diploma course in Fine Art at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (Singapore). Offers are made on the basis of interview, portfolio and an IELTS English Language score of 6.5 or equivalent. Other qualifications and experience will be considered on an individual basis.

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

•  To provide a supportive and intellectually stimulating environment where students can develop the critical and practical skills relevant to contemporary art practices.

•  To create an environment in which students encounter diverse and interconnected activities such as curating, exhibiting, cross-disciplinary practice and critical writing.

•  To enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of all aspects of art making, encouraging risk-taking, curiosity, innovation and adventurousness.

•  To foster a deep understanding of diverse methodologies that enables a critical framework for specialist art production, study and research.

•  To enable the student to develop autonomous working habits based on best practice exemplars in the professional art world: and to be cognizant of their role in a global contemporary society.

•  To ensure that students are able to contextualise their work with reference to relevant theoretical, historical, cultural, political and ethical issues, pertinent to contemporary art practice.

•  To prepare students for employment in germane creative industries.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Art and Design
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Initiate, develop and evaluate projects to generate a distinctive and personalised studio practice.
  • Use research methods related to studio practice: locate and evaluate visual and textual sources, organise ideas, develop critical perspectives on research materials and autonomous work practices based on reflective feedback.
  • Analysis history and theory with an emphasis on the contemporary debate around the interpretation and production of meaning in Fine Art and the historical and international context.
  • Select and experiment with a broad range of materials and processes appropriate to contemporary art production and dissemination.
  • Synthesise intention, process, outcome and context, methods of presentation and dissemination, and an awareness of new developments within relevant fields of studio practice.
  • Integrate entrepreneurial and professional practices in Fine Art: composing applications for further study and exhibition opportunities, marketing methods, approaches to curating and enterprise.

 

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Initiate their own studio work with appropriate media, undertaking the research necessary to sustain their practice and to generate ideas, objectives, questions and solutions, either individually or collaboratively.
  • Comprehend how to use relevant media and select what is appropriate for developing particular themes and ideas through to material outcomes whether these are, objects, texts, acoustic, or other methodologies based on critical awareness of contemporary and historical Fine Art practice.
  • Be confident and skilled in discussing issues raised by their own work and that of their peers and be articulate in relating these issues to examples of both historical and contemporary practice from a national and international perspective.
  • Identify opportunities to install artwork in coherent and communicative exhibitions.
  • Research art historical themes and issues and present their conclusions lucidly in essay, presentation and dissertation formats.
  • Apply professionalism and resourcefulness in establishing student’s own practice or promoting that of others and ensuring success with their post-course intentions.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Develop a significant body of innovative studio work through experimental procedure, adventurous application of technical knowledge and the creative translation of ideas into practice.
  • Effectively use materials and processes such as drawing, moving image, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, sound, and any other practices relevant to contemporary Fine Art practice.
  • Discuss and respond in their studio work and presentations to themes and issues relating to local or global contemporary visual culture, which have been generated through their own research in relation to exhibitions, lectures, tutorials and seminars.
  • Research and organise material relating to studio practice, art historical and theoretical studies and recognise relevant intercultural issues, leading to skills in communicating ideas in diverse formats including presentations, tutorial feedback, studio notebooks, short essays, blogs, dissertation and artists statement.
  • Report on museum and gallery exhibitions by summarizing their responses and delivering a public presentation that incorporates visual material.
  • Curate exhibitions both of their own work and peers, as well as of other artwork and related material, which will enable the student to understand the demands of Part C semester two Final Project.
  • Respond inventively to commission opportunities and be prepared to complete a commission brief.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Use information technology: word processing and image manipulation.
  • Manage self learning: take on new practical and research skills in response to a developing programmes of activity.
  • Problem solve: be resourceful in identifying and working with appropriate materials and processes to resolve questions arising in their work and to set challenges for furture practice.
  • Teamwork: be skilled at working in groups, in determining the scope and goals of the project, in researching as a team and in delegating the separate tasks necessary for effective group presentation of material.
  • Communicate effectively: be experienced in clearly presenting their work to diverse audiences both verbally and in writing.

4. Programme structure

Part C - Degree Modules

 

4.1.    Semester 1

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight:60)

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

Status

NYC116

Professional Fine Art Practice

30

1

Compulsory

NYC500

Art and Design Dissertation

30

1 & 2

Compulsory

 

 

4.2.    Semester 2

            COMPULSORY MODULE (total modular weight:60)

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

Status

NYC117

Fine Art Practice: Final Project

60

2

Compulsory

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

  • In order to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in Part C.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment.

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if;

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in NYC117

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level  module assessments.

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) Graphic Communication (Nanyang)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

n/a

Final award BA (Hons)
Programme title Graphic Communication
Programme code NYUB33
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is two semesters on a full time basis.
UCAS code n/a
Admissions criteria

Direct entry to the final year is available to students who successfully complete the Diploma course in Design and Media at Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts (Singapore). Offers are made on the basis of interview, portfolio and an IELTS English Language score of 6.5 or equivalent. Other qualifications and experience will be considered on an individual basis.

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  1. To develop intellectually stimulating learning through the study and practice of graphic communication.
  2. To encourage flexible thought processes including lateral and sequential thinking.
  3. To acquire and develop skills and processes including studiocraft, multi media skills, market awareness and relevant contextual theoretical knowledge.
  4. To test individual ideas and solutions in a contemporary global arena.
  5. To understand the significance of the international professional practice of graphic communication, including an awareness of global perspectives and cross cultural considerations.
  6. To enable students to manage their studies by devising their own learning strategy through tutorial consultation.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Art and Design
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The QAA Policy Statement on a structured and supported process for personal development

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of the programme, students should be able to:

  • Analyse a clients communication and design requirements.
  • Identify and resolve design and communication problems through an appropriate and considered visual evidence system.
  • Sort, organise and process information through qualities of critical judgement, discrimination and imagination.
  • Developing a personal design language or working process, which demonstrates a balance between objectivity (which is measurable) and subjectivity (which may be seen as idiosyncratic).
  • Acquire specialist knowledge and experience within an area of graphic communication in a global context.
  •  Utilise creative professional business elements of graphic communication, including marketing, pitching and presenting in a global context.
  • Integrate professional subject expectations including project management, communication and relevant delivery methods.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to:

  • Analyse the problems set out in the project brief(s) in relation to areas of theory and practice through an appropriate research methodology.
  • Produce effective design solutions by making appropriate choices supported by appropriate visual evidence.
  • Apply critical judgment to graphic communication projects and understand the audience for which the work is intended.
  • Develop their individual career direction having  researched opportunities and current practices of graphic communication from an international perspective.
  • Evolve a folio of work that encompasses a knowledge of the graphic design industry and their ambitions within it and that accurately reflects them as individuals.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

  • Experiment, test and evaluate media, processes and environment to contextualise their ideas.
  • Communicate graphic ideas and solutions to design problems using appropriate media.
  • Develop their use of specialist typographic and layout skills.
  • Synthesise textual and image-based material.
  • Use key software related to the project briefs.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

  • Lead or play an active part in a creative team.
  • Communicate effectively to tutors, peer group and external agencies where appropriate.
  • Display competency in the use of information technology.
  • Integrate support elements of creative practice, including marketing, presentation and project development.
  • Appreciate the value of diversity of language and culture.

4. Programme structure

Part C - Degree Modules

 

4.1    Semester 1

COMPULSORYMODULES (total modular weight: 60)

 

Code

Title

Modular Weight

Sem

Status

NYC431

Graphic Communication Contexts (1)

30

1

 Compulsory

NYC500

Art and Design Dissertation

30

1&2

Compulsory

 

4.2    Semester 2

COMPULSORY MODULE (total modular weight: 60)

 

Code

Title

Modular Weight

Sem

Status

NYC432

Graphic Communication Contexts (2)

60

2

Compulsory

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

  • In order to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits at Part C

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment.

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if:

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in NYC432

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level module assessments.

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) Textiles: Innovation and Design (2013 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

n/a

Final award BA (Hons), DPS/DIntS
Programme title Textiles: Innovation and Design
Programme code ACUB26/27
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is six or eight semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS), or a international university placement (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between part B and part C Alternatively, students may complete the programme on a part-time basis over not more than eight years.
UCAS code WJ24
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/arts/textilesinnovationanddesign/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical, conceptual and practical skills of the Textile Designer/Artist/Practitioner.
  • To promote a forward thinking culture where students approach their work with a sense of enquiry, individuality and innovation.
  • To pursue independent research and develop a personal visual language which can be applied to a range of Textiles practice.
  • To ensure that students have first hand experience of the processes involved in the planning and production of contemporary Textile outcomes.
  • To ensure the practice of Design, Art & Craft informed by awareness of historical and contemporary practice.
  • To create a framework of experience that allows the student to make informed decisions about their future directions.
  • To create an environment where independent judgement and decision making is undertaken, and a strong critical awareness promoted, based on a knowledge of personal strengths and weaknesses.
  • To ensure that students are able to contextualise their work with reference to theoretical, historical, cultural, political and ethical issues.
  • Demonstrate the ability to engage in critical analysis of text, images and objects as appropriate, and find, select and use contemporary, historical, theoretical, visual and material sources for research & writing.
  • To maintain and develop professional and external links and relationships in appropriate industrial and commercial contexts.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The QAA Policy Statement on a structured and supported process for personal development

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Generate ideas, research, concepts and solutions in response to internally/externally set briefs or within a self-initiated period.
  • Conduct personal research demonstrating a critical and questioning attitude to history and material culture.
  • Select and experiment with a broad range of materials and processes appropriate to the production of a range of Textiles outcomes.
  • Synthesise intention, process, outcome and context, and methods of presentation and dissemination.
  • Integrate professional and enterprising practice in Textiles and other design and craft related specialisms.
  • Synthesise current and emerging technologies relevant to Textiles production.
  • Develop independent, confident and innovative approaches to Textiles production.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the breadth and variety of opportunity within the Textiles discipline and be able to apply a suitable methodology to realise their own creative goals.
  • Articulate their experiments and outcomes with reasoned arguments.
  • Critically analyse the aesthetic and functional dynamics of design.
  • Show independence of concept through discovery, creativity and problem solving.
  • Identify opportunities for continuing professional development through further study or employment.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Undertake research into Art and Design concepts, process and contexts.
  • Direct research skills into written assignments and verbal presentations.
  • Confidently use specialist equipment necessary for the preparation of yarns, fibres, dyes and materials , and confidently work with a range of Textiles processes.
  • Demonstrate experimentation with materials and processes appropriate to Textile outcomes and final applications and produce evidence of technical and materials research.
  • Demonstrate a high standard of technical expertise in the Textile conclusions.
  • Manipulate and develop imagery through to textiles outcomes using CAD.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Manage self learning: initiate independent research and source areas of investigation, organise and plan work schedules, manage workloads and meet deadlines, plan time to make the best use of equipment and resources.
  • Problem solving: analyse information, and through selection and experimentation make informed judgements and decisions. Evaluate and recognise areas of personal strength and needs. Formulate reasoned responses to the critical judgement of others.
  • Communication: present work both visually and orally to a high standard, interact effectively with others through collaboration and negotiation, write on a given or chosen topic either in essay form or project brief, and display design work to exhibition standard.
  • IT: Demonstrate information technology skills in word processing and the appropriate computer software applications with which to develop design and practice
  • Team working: co-ordinate the use of common resources, share responsibility for a task with others.
  • Numeracy: produce specifications sufficient to reproduce fabric samples, show an understanding of the calculations involved in the use of specialist equipment.
  • Identify opportunities for continuing professional development through further study or employment.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAA611

Visual Research for Textiles for Textiles

20

1

Compulsory

SAA612

Design Development for Textiles

20

1

Compulsory

SAA500

 Research, Analysis & Study Skills in Art & Design

30

1&2

Compulsory

SAA613

Textiles Process and Exploration

30

2

Compulsory

SAA614

Textiles Exploration & Application

20

2

Compulsory

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAB621

Materials Processes and Conceptual Applications

40

1

Compulsory

SAB622

Sampling and Textiles Manufacture

40

2

Compulsory

SAB550

Professional and Enterprising Practice

10

1

Option

SAB552

Professional and Business Practice

20

1&2

Option

SAB553

Art Histories and Theories

30

1&2

Option

SAB554

Visual Culture: Histories and Theories

30

1&2

Option

SAB555

Design and Material Culture: Histories and Theories

20

1&2

Option

 

 

 

Students can choose SAB553 or SAB554 or SAB555.

  • If a student chooses SAB553 or SAB554, they must also take SAB550
  • If a student chooses SAB555, they must also take SAB552

 

 

4.3          Part I – Year Out (Four year Programme only)

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120

1 & 2

Optional

SAI002

International University Placement 

120

1 & 2

Optional

 

Students choose one of the above options

 

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC631

Textiles: Innovation & Interaction

30

1

Compulsory

SAC500

Art & Design Dissertation

30

1 & 2

Compulsory

SAC632

Final Project: Studio Practice in Textiles

60

2

Compulsory

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

  • In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits.
  • In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits at part B.
  • In order to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in part C.

 

Part-time students may negotiate the order in which modules are completed, subject to the following restrictions:

All part A modules must be passed before the start of part B of the programme.

All part B modules must be passed before the start of part C of the programme.

Students may transfer between full-time and part-time modes of study with the permission of the Dean of School (or nominee).

 

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment.

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if;

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits in any part of the programme
  • candidates fail to gain credit in SAC631
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in SAC632

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 20 and Part C 80 to determine the final mark.

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) Fine Art

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons)+ Diploma in International Studies / BA (Hons) + Diploma in Professional Studies
Programme title Fine Art
Programme code ACUB14
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is six or eight semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend the third academic year undertaking an international university placement (DIntS) or professional training (DPS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between part B and part C.
UCAS code W100, W101
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/arts/fineart/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide a supportive and intellectually stimulating environment through which to facilitate students’ acquisition of advanced practical and critical skills in contemporary fine art practice.

  • To embed the development of core practical skills – ranging across traditional and new media, 2D and 3D forms, analogue and digital processes – within an innovative and conceptually challenging curriculum.

  • To deliver a broad understanding of art making, encouraging cross-disciplinary practice, innovation and experimentation in the student learning experience.

  • To facilitate an understanding of diverse contexts for art production and consumption (within the studio and beyond) and foster a critical engagement with art’s historical, theoretical, cultural, political, social and ethical dimensions.

  • To enable the development of independent, professional and adaptable working practices pertinent to a global art context.

  • To prepare students for the manifold employment opportunities available in the creative industries, heritage sector and other cognate fields.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Art and Design
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The QAA Policy Statement on a structured and supported process for personal development
  • Credit level descriptors for Higher Education, Sourthern England Consortium for Credit Accumulation and Transfer.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Initiate, develop and evaluate ideas, realizing them through outcomes, to generate a distinctive, professional and individual art practice.

  • Use research methods related to art practice: locate and evaluate visual and textual sources, organise and develop ideas towards speculative enquiry, visualisation and/or making.

  • Understand and engage with current debates in fine art through a rigorous exploration of contemporary art’s histories, theories and its wider social and political contexts.

  • Integrate professional skills and enterprise within their art practice and demonstrate an adaptable approach to working in the cultural industries and cognate fields.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Understand how the choice of media can affect the material and conceptual development of practical work.

  • Articulate and synthesise ideas and information comprehensively in visual oral and written forms and present ideas and work to audiences in a range of situations.

  • Research art’s histories and evaluate contemporary theories, concepts and discourses in the arts.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a high level of technical skill and knowledge in traditional and contemporary processes that are relevant to the creative sector and industries.

  • Use, effectively, a range of materials and processes such as drawing, moving image, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, sound and performance, recognizing and responding to professional opportunities and contexts where appropriate.

  • Develop a body of ambitious studio work through experimentation, technical innovation and evidence of thinking through making in the creative translation of ideas into practice.

  • Engage with themes and issues relating to local and global contemporary visual culture, cognizant of the political and ethical implications therein.

  • Demonstrate high-level skills in both visual and textual analysis and present research through such forms as essays, presentations, studio notebooks, blogs, dissertations and artist statements.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding and knowledge of traditional and new/emerging technologies, their uses and applications.

  • Solve problems individually or as part of a team through collaboration and collegial cooperation.

  • Manage complex long term projects professionally and work to deadlines.

  • Demonstrate the ability to reflect upon and articulate their skills in a range of different creative, intellectual and practical contexts.

  • Manifest an understanding of ethical issues and an appreciation of cultural diversity.

4. Programme structure

 

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

  

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAA123

Introduction to Fine Art

40

1

Compulsory

SAA921

Drawing: Discourses and Debates

20

1

Compulsory

SAA124

Developing Fine Art Practice

40

2

Compulsory

SAA922

Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art and Design

20

2

Compulsory

 

4.2          Part B - Degree Modules

 

Code

Title

Module
Weight

Sem

status

SAB115

Reflective Fine Art Practice

40

1

Compulsory

SAB114

Locating Fine Art Practice

40

2

Compulsory

SAB931

Contemporary Art and Theory

20

1

Compulsory

 

Students must choose a 20 credit module from the indicative School-wide options.

 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management

  • English, Drama, Publishing and Creative Writing

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Code

Title

Module
Weight

Sem

status

SAB929

19th Century Bodies

20

2

Option

SAB933

Material Culture

20

2

Option

SAB934

Fashion Theory

20

2

Option

SAB935

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

20

2

Option

SAB937

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

20

2

Option

SAB938

Arts Management

20

2

Option

SAB939

Word and Image: Verbo-visual exchange in art and literature

20

2

Option

EAB012

African American Culture

20

2

Option

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

20

2

Option

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20

2

Option

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20

2

Option

EAB809

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

20

2

Option

EAB912

Costume Design

20

2

Option

 

4.3       Part I – Year Out (Four year Programme only)

 Code

 Title

 Module Weight

 Sem

 status

 SAI001

 Industrial Training Placement

 120

 1 & 2

 Optional

 SAI002

 International University
Placement

 120

 1 & 2

 Optional

 Students choose one of the above options

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

 Students choose either Route A or Route B in Semester one

 

Route A

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC116

Resolving Fine Art Practice

20

1

Compulsory

SAC940

Art and Design Dissertation

40

1

Compulsory

 

Route B

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC118

Consolidating Fine Art Practice

40

1

Compulsory

SAC119

Fine Arts Research Report

20

1

Compulsory

Semester Two

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC117

Fine Art Practice: Final Project

60

2

Compulsory

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

  • In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits.
  • In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in Part B.
  • In order to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in Part C. 

Successful completion of Part I leads to the additional qualification of Diploma in International Studies or Diploma in Professional Studies.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment.

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if:

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits in any part of the programme
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in SAC117

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 20 and Part C 80 to determine the final percentage mark.

 

 

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) Textiles: Innovation and Design

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

n/a

Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons)+ Diploma in International Studies / BA (Hons) + Diploma in Professional Studies
Programme title Textiles: Innovation and Design
Programme code ACUB26
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is six or eight semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS), or a international university placement (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between part B and part C.
UCAS code WJ24, J420
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/arts/textilesinnovationanddesign/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical, analytical, conceptual and practical skills necessary for high level contemporary Textiles Practice and which offers them the opportunity to explore their individual ideas and concepts in depth.

  • To maintain and expand professional and external links and relationships in appropriate industrial and commercial contexts to support the development of enterprising and highly employable individuals, that also allows students to make informed decisions about their future directions.

  • To promote a forward thinking culture in which students are active participants in the School learning community and are encouraged to approach their work with a sense of enquiry, individuality and innovation.

  • To ensure that students have broad first-hand experience of processes involved in the planning and production of contemporary Textile outcomes,, whilst developing specilaised knowledge aligning with current contextual requirements  - Interiors, Fashion, Textiles Art, Research, and the developing areas of Performance and Digital Production.

  • To ensure the development of significant skills in the practice of Design, Art and Craft informed by an awareness of historical and contemporary practice, ensuring that students are able to contextualise their work with reference to theoretical, historical, cultural, political and ethical issues, making use of the multiple resources provided by the School to support their learning.

  • To create an environment where independent judgment and decision making is undertaken with integrity, and a strong critical awareness, based on a knowledge of personal strengths and weaknesses.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Art and Design
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The QAA Policy Statement on a structured and supported process for personal development

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Generate ideas, research, concepts and solutions in response to internally/externally set briefs or within a self-initiated period.

  • Conduct personal research demonstrating a critical and questioning attitude to history, theory  and material culture.

  • Select and experiment with a broad range of materials and processes appropriate to the production of a range of Textiles outcomes, whilst demonstrating an in depth understanding of one of the specialist areas offered in optional pathways and make use of the resources provided to support their learning. 

  • Develop independent, confident and innovative approaches to Textiles production, through Printed, Woven, Multi-Media or Digital processes, demonstrating in depth exploration of individual ideas and concepts. 

  • Integrate professional and enterprising practice in Textiles and other design and craft related specialisms.

  • Synthesise current and emerging technologies relevant to Textiles production, bringing diverse information and ideas together to create innovative outcomes.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the breadth and variety of opportunity within the Textiles discipline and be able to apply a suitable methodology to realise their own creative goals.

  • Achieve a body of Textiles work that is coherent and well resolved and appropriate for the contemporary context, to reflect the strengths of the specialist pathways within the programme.

  • Articulate experiments and outcomes with reasoned arguments, and be able to undertake critical analysis to evaluate the aesthetic and functional dynamics of their design outcomes.

  • Show independence of concept through discovery, creativity and problem solving, and be able to identify new concepts and approaches within the existing knowledge framework. 

  • Identify opportunities for continuing development through further study or employment, and be able to apply their knowledge within a broad range of professional contexts.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Undertake research into Art and Design concepts, processes and contexts. 

  • Direct research skills into textiles practice, written assignments and verbal presentations. 

  • Work effectively with a range of textiles processes and confidently use specialist equipment necessary for the preparation of yarns, fibers, dyes and materials.

  • Evidence experimentation and innovation with materials and processes appropriate to Textile outcomes and final applications, demonstrating  a high standard of technical expertise in Print, Weave, Multi-media or Integrated Digital Practice.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Take responsibility for individual learning and development, initiate independent research, organise and plan work schedules, manage workloads and meet deadlines, plan time to make the best use of equipment and resources.

  • Analyse information, and through selection and experimentation make informed judgements and decisions. Evaluate and recognise areas of personal strength and needs. Formulate reasoned responses to the critical judgement of others.

  • Present work both visually and orally to a high standard, interact effectively with others through collaboration and negotiation, write on a given or chosen topic either in essay form or project brief, and display design work to exhibition standard.

  • Demonstrate information technology skills in word processing and the appropriate computer software applications with which to develop design and practice.

  • Co-ordinate the use of common resources, collaborate and share responsibility with others.

  • Produce specifications sufficient to reproduce fabric samples, show an understanding of the calculations involved in the use of specialist equipment.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAA611

Visual Research for Textiles

20

1

Compulsory

SAA612

Design Development for Textiles

20

1

Compulsory

SAA921

Drawing: Discourses and Debates

20

1

Compulsory

SAA613

Textiles: Process and Exploration

40

2

Compulsory

SAA922

Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art and Design

20

2

Compulsory

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAB621

Materials Processes and Conceptual Applications

40

1

Compulsory

SAB622

Sampling and Textiles Manufacture

40

2

Compulsory

SAB930

Professional and Business Practice

20

1

Compulsory

 

Students must choose a 20 credit module from the indicative School-wide options.

 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management

  • English, Drama, Publishing and Creative Writing

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the availabe modules will be:

Code

Title

Module
Weight

Sem

status

SAB929

19th Century Bodies

20

2

Option

SAB933

Material Culture

20

2

Option

SAB934

Fashion Theory

20

2

Option

SAB935

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

20

2

Option

SAB937

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

20

2

Option

SAB938

Arts Management

20

2

Option

SAB939

Word and Image: Verbo-visual exchange in art and literature

20

2

Option

EAB012

African American Culture

20

2

Option

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

20

2

Option

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20

2

Option

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20

2

Option

EAB809

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

20

2

Option

EAB912

Costume Design

20

2

Option

 

4.3          Part I – Year Out (Four year Programme only)

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120

1 & 2

Optional

SAI002

International University Placement 

120

1 & 2

Optional

 

Students choose one of the above options

 

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC633

Textiles: Innovation, Exploration and Invention

40

1

Compulsory

SAC634

Textiles Research Report

20

1

Option

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20

1

Option

Students choose either SAC634 or EAC900

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC632

Final Project Textiles Studio Practice

60

2

Compulsory

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

  • In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits.
  • In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits at part B.
  • In order to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in part C. 

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment.

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if;

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits in any part of the programme
  • candidates fail to gain credit in SAC633
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in SAC632

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 20 and Part C 80 to determine the final mark.

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) Graphic Communication and Illustration

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + Diploma in International Studies / BA (Hons) + Diploma in Professional Studie
Programme title Graphic Communication and Illustration
Programme code ACUB44
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is six or eight semesters. Candidates following the four year sandwich programme are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or undertaking a year’s study abroad leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS), in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between part B and part C.
UCAS code W900, W901
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/arts/graphiccommunicationandillustration/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To develop flexible thought processes including critical, analytical, lateral and sequential design thinking, that afford students opportunities to explore ideas or concepts in depth. 

  • To identify, develop, and synthesize specialist materials, processes and techniques, in relation to studio craft through a range of current and emergent analogue and digital media including opportunities to bring information and ideas together from relevant alternative topics.

  • To initiate research leading to creative professional practice in Graphic Communication and Illustration. 

  • To prioritize elements of the visual and verbal interface for communications effectiveness; including drawing, typography, sequential and narrative design and emergent media, through research, ideation, communication and elicitation.

  • To produce expressive, reflective and professional practitioners who understand audience needs. 

  • To discuss and evaluate personal and group outcomes in relation to economic, vocational, ethical, sustainability and global contexts.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statement for Art and Design

The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

The QAA Policy Statement on a structured and supported process for personal development

 

 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Integrate basic approaches to visual research.  

  • Articulate the functions of graphic communication and illustration.  

  • Appreciate the functions of historical and critical studies in Art and Design.  

  • Synthesise the social, cultural and economic roles of visual communication.  

  • Locate their work within relevant environments for audiences.  

  • Adopt and adapt appropriate practical solutions to design problems. 

  • Apply visual communication within a global context.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Process visual research through ideation, communication and elicitation.

  •  Identify and critically discuss the definitions and functions of images, texts, practices and objects in Art and Design.

  • Demonstrate critical and creative skills, and to apply them in the formulation and appraisal of methodologies for problem solving.

  • Negotiate and pursue specialised areas of study using relevant resources provided to support their learning such as workshops, labs and the Library.
     
  • Students will receive timely specialist feedback on all assessed work following each assessment point to help them critically locate personal practice within the wider creative and global arena.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Experiment with materials, processes and technology.  

  • Employ effective design strategies and methods to express ideas.  

  • Evaluate and negotiate individual and group roles and functions within a range of interdisciplinary practice models as part of their learning community.  

  • Diagnose and solve a variety of visual problems relevant to current and emergent environments and audiences.  

  • Identify design problems and develop and express appropriate practical design solutions.  

  • Produce work that demonstrates critical, creative, technical and practical skills equating with professional and business practice within a global context.

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Engage in critical discussion relevant to the discipline about the relationship between theory and practice.

  • Foster accountability, ambition, opinion, innovation and resourcefulness within individual and group working. 

  • Demonstrate an awareness of the role of social, cultural and economic factors in relation to their own and others’ work.

  • Organise, present and communicate ideas and arguments orally, visually and in written form. 

  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate, manage and appraise projects with autonomy and initiative. 

  • Understand the significance of international professional practice and apply an awareness of global perspectives and transcultural considerations.

4. Programme structure

4.1. Part A - Introductory Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAA801

Visual Research in Practice

40

1

Compulsory

SAA921

Drawing: Discourses and Debates

20

1

Compulsory

SAA802

Visual Methods in Practice

40

2

Compulsory

SAA922

Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art and Design

20

2

Compulsory

 

 

4.2 Part B - Degree Modules

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAB803

Content and Context: Society, Culture and Economy

40

1

Compulsory

SAB804

Locating Practice: Interpreting Environments and Audiences

40

2

Compulsory

SAB932

Visual Culture: Histories and Theories

20

1

Compulsory

 

 

Students must choose a 20 credit module from the indicative School-wide options.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management

  • English, Drama, Publishing and Creative Writing

     

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Code

Title

Module
Weight

Sem

status

SAB929

19th Century Bodies

20

2

Option

SAB933

Material Culture

20

2

Option

SAB934

Fashion Theory

20

2

Option

SAB935

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

20

2

Option

SAB937

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

20

2

Option

SAB938

Arts Management

20

2

Option

SAB939

Word and Image: Verbo-visual exchange in art and literature

20

2

Option

EAB012

African American Culture

20

2

Option

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

20

2

Option

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20

2

Option

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20

2

Option

EAB809

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

20

2

Option

EAB912

Costume Design

20

2

Option

 

 

4.3 Part I – Year Out (Four year Programme only)

 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120

1&2

Optional

SAI002

International University Placement

120

1&2

Optional

 

Students choose one of the above options

 

 

4.4 Part C - Degree Modules

 Students choose either Route A or Route B in Semester One

 

Route A

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC809

Focusing Directions in Graphic Communication and Illustration Practice

20

1

Compulsory

SAC940

Art and Design Dissertation

40

1

Compulsory

 

Route B

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC807

Synergising Directions in Graphic Communication and Illustration Practice  40  1  Compulsory

SAC808

Industrial Intelligence in Graphic Communication and Illustration Practice 20 1 Compulsory

 

 

Semester Two 

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC806

Destinations in Graphic Communication and Illustration Practice

60

2

Compulsory

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

  • to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits;
  • to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits at part B;
  • to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in part C. 

5.2 Reassessment

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment. 

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if;

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits in any part of the programme
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in SAC806.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The average weighted mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 20 and Part C 80 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama (2015 and 2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Drama
Programme code EAUB02
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W400 / W401
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/drama/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama;
  • to enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of Drama;
  • to enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in Drama through specialist study and research;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The QAA Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Knowledge of classical and contemporary Drama;
  • Understanding and practical experience of a range of research methods;
  • Capability of comparing theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically;
  • Appreciation of social and cultural diversity;
  • Awareness of the role of culture in a changing performance landscape;
  • Grasp of the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • engage in critical reasoning;
  • apply Drama and theatre studies concepts and theories;
  • articulate arguments in speech, writing and other forms.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • locate and retrieve information;
  • use research tools;
  • design and perform practical projects.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • participate effectively in group work;
  • use communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation;
  • manage their time effectively.

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

All 120 credits are compulsory at Part A

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 60)

EAA911

Acting and the Classics

20 credits

EAA913

How to Read a Play

20 credits

EAA915

Performance Practices

20 credits

Optional - NONE

  


Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 60)

EAA910

Devising for Performance

20 credits

EAA912

The Theatre and its Histories

20 credits

EAA914

From Analysis to Performance

20 credits

Optional - NONE

  

Part B - Degree Modules

Candidates may only choose one practical optional module in each semester.

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules outside of Drama. 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:


Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB931

Production 1

20 credits

Optional

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB922

Popular Theatres

20 credits

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

  

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAB930

Performance Philosophy

20 credits

EAB932

Production 2

20 credits

Optional

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

Interdisciplinary Arts options also available in Semester 2:

Candidates may choose to take a module from the following list in place of a module in their main subject area.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Literature, and Culture
  • Publishing

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

SAB938 Arts Management 20 credits

EAB912

Costume Design 

20 credits

SAB935 Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art 20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

SAB934

Fashion Theory

20 credits

EAB808 From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions 20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

SAB933

Material Culture

20 credits

SAB929

19th-Century Bodies

20 credits

EAB050 Philosophy, Literature and the Arts 20 credits
SAB937 Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and new technologies 20 credits
SAB939 Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchange in Art and Literature 20 credits

 

Candidates may apply to the Programme Director for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester only during Part B of the degree programme.

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules

Candidates may only choose one practical optional module in each semester. In accordance with University Regulations, students should take at least 90 credits of C-coded modules in their final year of study.

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules outside of Drama. 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

Research Project

40 credits

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAC951

Group Project

20 credits

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

 


Semester 2 

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in Semester 1) 20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%: Part C 60% to determine the programme mark. 

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama (2012 to 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Drama
Programme code EAUB02
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W400 / W401
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/drama/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama;
  • to enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of Drama;
  • to enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in Drama through specialist study and research;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The QAA Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Knowledge of classical and contemporary Drama;
  • Understanding and practical experience of a range of research methods;
  • Capability of comparing theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically;
  • Appreciation of social and cultural diversity;
  • Awareness of the role of culture in a changing performance landscape;
  • Grasp of the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • engage in critical reasoning;
  • apply Drama and theatre studies concepts and theories;
  • articulate arguments in speech, writing and other forms.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • locate and retrieve information;
  • use research tools;
  • design and perform practical projects.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • participate effectively in group work;
  • use communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation;
  • manage their time effectively.

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

Candidates must choose 20 credits of optional modules in Semester 2 so that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year. These credits may be chosen either from those listed, or from modules taught by departments other than English and Drama. 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 60)

EAA145

Performance, Stage and Management

20 credits

EAA146

Textual and Historical Studies

20 credits

EAA143

Philosophising Performance

10 credits

EAA512

Theoretical Approaches to Drama

10 credits

Optional - NONE

  


Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA144

Performance and Analysis

20 credits

EAA013

Non-Western Performance

10 credits

EAA147

Textual Studies

10 credits

Optional (total modular weight 20)

EAA012

Directing and Production

20 credits

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA505

Technical Theatre

20 credits

EAA011

Writing in History

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

  

Part B - Degree Modules

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year. In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules outside of Drama. If such modules are weighted at 10 credits each they may take as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.


Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB910

Devised Theatre

20 credits

EAB917

Media Performance

20 credits

EAB505

Movement in Performance

20 credits

EAB918

Revolt Against Fate: Literature and Theatre of the Absurd

20 credits

EAB009

Theatre, Nation and Trauma: Contemporary Irish Drama

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

  

Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB920

Performing the Absurd (pre-requisite EAB918)

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB004

World Theatres

20 credits

EAB101

Semester Abroad

60 credits

Candidates may apply to the Programme Director for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester only during Part B of the degree programme.

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year. In accordance with University Regulations, students should take at least 90 credits of C-coded modules in their final year of study.

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules outside of Drama. If such modules are weighted at 10 credits each they may take as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.

There are no compulsory modules in Part C.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

Research Project

40 credits

Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAC221

The Applied Drama Toolkit

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken in completed at Part B)

20 credits

EAC504

Theatre of the Fantastic

20 credits

 


Semester 2 

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice (if not taken in Semester 1)

40 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in Semester 1) 20 credits

EAB912

Costume Design (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

EAC908

Gender and the Stage

20 credits

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%: Part C 60% to determine the programme mark. 

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama with Business Studies (2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons / BA(Hons) +DPS
Programme title Drama with Business Studies
Programme code EAUB11
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W4N1 / WN41
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/dramawithaminorinbusinessstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama and Business management.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.
  • To ensure that graduates are trained to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives, and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance.
  • The Benchmark Statement for General Business and Management.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ).

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Substantial knowledge of a range of classical and contemporary Drama with an awareness of the role of culture in a changing performance landscape.
  • An understanding and practical experience of a range of research methods.
  • The ability to compare theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically.
  • An ability to grasp the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama.
  • An understanding of theories, principles and practice, developed from study of core management areas of human resources, finance, marketing and organisational behaviour.
  • Knowledge of the importance of policy, planning and management in business. The behaviour, management and development of people within organisations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the central role in culture of Drama and have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument using speech, writing and other forms.
  • Apply Drama and theatre studies concepts and theories.
  • Use critical thinking, analysis and syntheses to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios.
  • Relate theory to practice.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Locate and retrieve information using a range of resources.
  • Design and perform practical projects.
  • Present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form.
  • Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have acquired the following skills:

  • Effective communication
  • Effective organisational and time-management skills
  • Effective use of information technology
  • Numeracy skills
  • Effective team-working skills

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA913

How to Read a Play

20 credits

EAA915

Performance Practices

20 credits

Optional - NONE


Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA912

The Theatre and its Histories

20 credits

EAA914

From Analysis to Performance

20 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory  (total modular weight 20)

BSA505

Organisational Behaviour

10 credits

BSA050

Introduction to Management

10 credits

Optional - NONE


Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSA506

Management of Human Resources

10 credits

BSA026

Principles of Law

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Part B - Degree Modules

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:


Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB931

Production 1

20 credits

Optional

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB922

Popular Theatres

20 credits

 

Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB930

Performance Philosophy

20 credits

Optional

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

 


Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSB530

Accounting for Business

10 credits

BSB560

Principles of Marketing

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 10)

BSB562

The Marketing Mix

10 credits

Optional

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10 credits

BSB550

Company Finance

10 credits

  

Interdisciplinary Arts options also available in Semester 2:

 

Candidates may choose to take a module in the following list in place of a module in their main subject areas.

 Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  •  History of Art, Architecture and Design
  •  Visual Culture
  • Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Literature, and Culture
  • Publishing

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

SAB938

Arts Management

20 credits

EAB912

Costume Design

20 credits

SAB935

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

SAB934

Fashion Theory

20 credits

EAB809

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

SAB933

Material Culture

20 credits

SAB929

19th Century Bodies

20 credits

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

20 credits

SAB937

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

20 credits

SAB939

Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchange in Art and Literature

20 credits

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year. In accordance with University Regulations, students should take at least 90 credits of C-coded modules in their final year of study.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semesters 1 and 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

Research Project

40 credits

Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken in completed at Part B)

20 credits

 

Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

  


Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSC522

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

10 credits

BSC565

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

10 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSC524

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning

10 credits

BSC575

Leadership and Interpersonal Skills

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory Drama modules.

.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama with a Minor in Business Studies (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons / BA(Hons) +DPS
Programme title Drama with a Minor in Business Studies
Programme code EAUB11
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W4N1 / WN41
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/dramawithaminorinbusinessstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama and Business management.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.
  • To ensure that graduates are trained to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives, and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance.
  • The Benchmark Statement for General Business and Management.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ).

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Substantial knowledge of a range of classical and contemporary Drama with an awareness of the role of culture in a changing performance landscape.
  • An understanding and practical experience of a range of research methods.
  • The ability to compare theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically.
  • An ability to grasp the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama.
  • An understanding of theories, principles and practice, developed from study of core management areas of human resources, finance, marketing and organisational behaviour.
  • Knowledge of the importance of policy, planning and management in business. The behaviour, management and development of people within organisations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the central role in culture of Drama and have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument using speech, writing and other forms.
  • Apply Drama and theatre studies concepts and theories.
  • Use critical thinking, analysis and syntheses to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios.
  • Relate theory to practice.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Locate and retrieve information using a range of resources.
  • Design and perform practical projects.
  • Present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form.
  • Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have acquired the following skills:

  • Effective communication
  • Effective organisational and time-management skills
  • Effective use of information technology
  • Numeracy skills
  • Effective team-working skills

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA913

How to Read a Play

20 credits

EAA915

Performance Practices

20 credits

Optional - NONE


Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA912

The Theatre and its Histories

20 credits

EAA914

From Analysis to Performance

20 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory  (total modular weight 20)

BSA505

Organisational Behaviour

10 credits

BSA050

Introduction to Management

10 credits

Optional - NONE


Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSA506

Management of Human Resources

10 credits

BSA026

Principles of Law

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Part B - Degree Modules

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas in Drama:

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules in Drama will be:


Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB931

Production 1

20 credits

Optional

EAB004

World Theatres

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB922

Popular Theatres

20 credits

 

Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB930

Performance Philosophy

20 credits

Optional

EAB912

Costume Design (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

 


Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSB530

Accounting for Business

10 credits

BSB560

Principles of Marketing

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 10)

BSB562

The Marketing Mix

10 credits

Optional

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10 credits

BSB550

Company Finance

10 credits

  

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules

 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year. In accordance with University Regulations, students should take at least 90 credits of C-coded modules in their final year of study.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas in Drama:

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules in Drama will be:

Semesters 1 and 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

Research Project

40 credits

Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken in completed at Part B)

20 credits

 

Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

  


Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSC522

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

10 credits

BSC565

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

10 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

BSC524

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning

10 credits

BSC575

Leadership and Interpersonal Skills

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory Drama modules .

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama with a Minor in Business Studies (2013 and 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons / BA(Hons) +DPS
Programme title Drama with a Minor in Business Studies
Programme code EAUB11
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W4N1 / WN41
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/dramawithaminorinbusinessstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama and Business management.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.
  • To ensure that graduates are trained to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives, and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance.
  • The Benchmark Statement for General Business and Management.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ).

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Substantial knowledge of a range of classical and contemporary Drama with an awareness of the role of culture in a changing performance landscape.
  • An understanding and practical experience of a range of research methods.
  • The ability to compare theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically.
  • An ability to grasp the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama.
  • An understanding of theories, principles and practice, developed from study of core management areas of human resources, finance, marketing and organisational behaviour.
  • Knowledge of the importance of policy, planning and management in business. The behaviour, management and development of people within organisations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the central role in culture of Drama and have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument using speech, writing and other forms.
  • Apply Drama and theatre studies concepts and theories.
  • Use critical thinking, analysis and syntheses to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios.
  • Relate theory to practice.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Locate and retrieve information using a range of resources.
  • Design and perform practical projects.
  • Present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form.
  • Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have acquired the following skills:

  • Effective communication
  • Effective organisational and time-management skills
  • Effective use of information technology
  • Management of self-development
  • Numeracy skills
  • Effective team-working skills

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory (40 credits)

EAA145

Performance, Stage and Management

20 credits

EAA146

Textual and Historical Studies

20 credits

Optional - NONE


Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory (40 credits)

EAA144

Performance and Analysis

20 credits

EAA143

Philosophising Performance

10 credits

EAA512

Theoretical Approaches to Drama

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory  (20 credits)

BSA505

Organisational Behaviour

10 credits

BSA050

Introduction to Management

10 credits

Optional - NONE


Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (20 credits)

BSA506

Management of Human Resources

10 credits

BSA025

Introduction to Law

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Part B - Degree Modules

Candidates may choose optional modules so that as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.


Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB910

Devised Theatre

20 credits

EAB917

Media Performance

20 credits

EAB505

Movement in Performance

20 credits

EAB918

Revolt against Fate: Literature and Theatre of the Absurd

20 credits

EAB009

Theatre, Nation and Trauma: Contemporary Irish Drama

20 credits

 

Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB920

Performing the Absurd (pre-requisite EAB918)

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB004

World Theatres

20 credits

 


Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory (20 credits)

BSB530

Accounting for Business

10 credits

BSB520

Principles of Marketing for Sport and Leisure

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (10 credits)

BSB522

The Marketing Mix for Sport and Leisure

10 credits

Optional – (10 credits)

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10 credits

BSB550

Company Finance

10 credits

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

10 credits

  

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year. In accordance with University Regulations, students should take at least 90 credits of C-coded modules in their final year of study.

Semesters 1 and 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

Research Project

40 credits

Semester 1 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAC221

The Applied Drama Toolkit

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken in completed at Part B)

20 credits

EAC504

Theatre of the Fantastic

20 credits

 

Semester 2 Drama Modules

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice (if not taken in semester 1)

40 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAB912

Costume Design (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

EAC908

Gender and the Stage

20 credits

  


Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory (20 credits)

BSC522

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

10 credits

BSC565

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

10 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (20 credits)

BSC524

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning

10 credits

BSC575

Leadership and Interpersonal Skills

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory Drama modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama with English (2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Drama with English
Programme code EAUB05
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W4Q3 / WQ43
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/dramawithaminorinenglish/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama, and a perspective on the social and cultural significance of English literature;
  • to enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of Drama, and of selected instances of  English literature and language;
  • to enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in Drama through specialist study and research;
  • to stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in Drama and English;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance
  • The Benchmark Statement for English
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Knowledge of classical and contemporary Drama;
  • Some knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800;
  • Understanding and practical experience of a range of research and critical methods in Drama and English studies;
  • Capability of comparing theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically;
  • Appreciation of social and cultural diversity;
  • Awareness of the role of culture in a changing landscape of performance and literary production;
  • Grasp of the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama;
  • Some understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama;
  • An appreciation of the structure and functions of the English language.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • engage in critical reasoning;
  • apply Drama, theatre studies and literary concepts and theories;
  • articulate arguments in speech, writing and other forms.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • locate and retrieve information;
  • use research tools;
  • design and perform practical projects;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral, written and performed communications.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  • participate effectively in group work;
  • use communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation;
  • manage their time effectively.

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

Drama Component 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA911

Acting and the Classics

20 credits

EAA915

Performance Practices

20 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA912

The Theatre and its Histories

20 credits

EAA914

From Analysis to Performance

20 credits

Optional - NONE                                                                                                                                         

 

English Component

 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAA700

Narrative Forms and Fiction

20 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA200

How to do things with Digital Texts

20 credits

EAA701

Literary and Critical Theories

20 credits

 

Part B - Degree Modules 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

Candidates may apply to the Programme Director for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester only during Part B of the degree programme.

Candidates who register for the Erasmus exchange programme must undertake the placement in place of one semester at Part B of the degree programme. Students must register for a total of 60 credits in English and Drama in addition to the 60-credit Semester Abroad module.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 Drama Component

 Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 80 but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of credits in Drama to be accumulated at Part B is 60.

Semester 1

Compulsory - (total modular weight 20)

 EAB931

 Production 1

 20 credits

 Optional

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB922

Popular Theatres

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

  

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB930

Performance Philosophy

20 credits

Optional

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

English Component 

Candidates must normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 40 at Part B.

  Semester 1

 Compulsory - NONE

 Optional

EAB710

Renaissance Writings

20 credits

EAB008

Victorian Literature

20 credits

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture

20 credits

EAB035

The Weird Tale

20 credits

  Semester 2

 Compulsory - NONE

 Optional

EAB712

Modernisms

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB017

America at War

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB018

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

20 credits

  

Interdisciplinary Arts options also available in Semester 2:

Candidates may choose to take a module in the following list in place of a module in their main subject area of Drama.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  •  History of Art, Architecture and Design
  •  Visual Culture
  •  Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Literature, and Culture
  • Publishing

 In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

SAB938

Arts Management

20 credits

EAB912

Costume Design

20 credits

SAB935

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

SAB934

Fashion Theory

20 credits

EAB809

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

SAB933

Material Culture

20 credits

SAB929

19th Century Bodies

20 credits

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

20 credits

SAB937

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

20 credits

SAB939

Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchange in Art and Literature

20 credits

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

There are no compulsory modules in Part C.

 Drama component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 80 but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of credits in Drama to be accumulated at Part C is 40.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

 Research Project

 40 credits

 Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

 Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

English component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 40 but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of credits in English to be accumulated at Part C is 20.

 

Optional

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

 Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC314

Maps and Motors: The Writing Portfolio

20 credits

EAC002

The Return of the King: Literature 1689-1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

  Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC024

The Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women of the 1890s

20 credits

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815-1832

20 credits 

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama with a Minor in English (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Drama with a Minor in English
Programme code EAUB05
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W4Q3 / WQ43
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/dramawithaminorinenglish/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama, and a perspective on the social and cultural significance of English literature;
  • to enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of Drama, and of selected instances of  English literature and language;
  • to enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in Drama through specialist study and research;
  • to stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in Drama and English;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance
  • The Benchmark Statement for English
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Knowledge of classical and contemporary Drama;
  • Some knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800;
  • Understanding and practical experience of a range of research and critical methods in Drama and English studies;
  • Capability of comparing theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically;
  • Appreciation of social and cultural diversity;
  • Awareness of the role of culture in a changing landscape of performance and literary production;
  • Grasp of the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama;
  • Some understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama;
  • An appreciation of the structure and functions of the English language.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • engage in critical reasoning;
  • apply Drama, theatre studies and literary concepts and theories;
  • articulate arguments in speech, writing and other forms.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • locate and retrieve information;
  • use research tools;
  • design and perform practical projects;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral, written and performed communications.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  • participate effectively in group work;
  • use communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation;
  • manage their time effectively.

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

Drama Component 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA911

Acting and the Classics

20 credits

EAA915

Performance Practices

20 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA912

The Theatre and its Histories

20 credits

EAA914

From Analysis to Performance

20 credits

Optional - NONE                                                                                                                                         

 

English Component

 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAA700

Narrative Forms and Fiction

20 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA006

Introduction to American Literature

20 credits

EAA701

Literary and Critical Theories

20 credits

 

Part B - Degree Modules 

 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

Candidates may apply to the Programme Director for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester only during Part B of the degree programme.

Candidates who register for the Erasmus exchange programme must undertake the placement in place of one semester at Part B of the degree programme. Students must register for a total of 60 credits in English and Drama in addition to the 60-credit Semester Abroad module.

 Drama Component

 

Semester 1

Compulsory - (total modular weight 20)

 EAB931

 Production 1

 20 credits

 Optional

EAB004

World Theatres

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB922

Popular Theatres

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

  

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB930

Performance Philosophy

20 credits

Optional

EAB912

Costume Design (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

English Component 

Candidates must normally choose optional modules with a total modular weight of 40 across the year.

  Semester 1

 Compulsory - NONE

 Optional

EAB710

Renaissance Writings

20 credits

EAB008

Victorian Literature

20 credits

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture

20 credits

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB102

American Adaptations

20 credits

EAB040

New Woman Writing of the Fin de Siecle

20 credits

EAB035

The Weird Tale

20 credits

  Semester 2

 Compulsory - NONE

 Optional

EAB712

Modernisms

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB060

American Nightmare

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB018

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

20 credits

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts

20 credits

  

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules 

 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

There are no compulsory modules in Part C.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 Drama component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 80 but may choose fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of Drama credits to be accumulateed at Part C is 40.

 

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

 Research Project

 40 credits

 Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

 Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

English component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 40 but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of English creditsto be accumulated at Part C is 20.

 

Optional

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

 Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC314

Maps and Motors: The Writing Portfolio

20 credits

EAC002

The Return of the King: Literature 1689-1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

  Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC024

The Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

20 credits

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815-1832

20 credits 

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Drama with a Minor in English (2012 to 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Drama with a Minor in English
Programme code EAUB05
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code W4Q3 / WQ43
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/dramawithaminorinenglish/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama, and a perspective on the social and cultural significance of English literature;
  • to enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of Drama, and of selected instances of  English literature and language;
  • to enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in Drama through specialist study and research;
  • to stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in Drama and English;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance
  • The Benchmark Statement for English
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Knowledge of classical and contemporary Drama;
  • Some knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800;
  • Understanding and practical experience of a range of research and critical methods in Drama and English studies;
  • Capability of comparing theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically;
  • Appreciation of social and cultural diversity;
  • Awareness of the role of culture in a changing landscape of performance and literary production;
  • Grasp of the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in Drama;
  • Some understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama;
  • An appreciation of the structure and functions of the English language.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • engage in critical reasoning;
  • apply Drama, theatre studies and literary concepts and theories;
  • articulate arguments in speech, writing and other forms.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • locate and retrieve information;
  • use research tools;
  • design and perform practical projects;
  • present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral, written and performed communications.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  • participate effectively in group work;
  • use communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation;
  • manage their time effectively.

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

Candidates may choose optional modules so that as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.

Drama Component 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA146

Textual and Historical Studies

20 credits

EAA145

Performance, Stage and Management

20 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA144

Performance and Analysis

20 credits

EAA143

Philosophising Performance

10 credits

Optional (10 credits)                                                                                                                                           

EAA013

Non-Western Performance

10 credits

EAA147

Textual Studies

10 credits

 

English Component

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 10)

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

Optional

EAA006

Introduction to American Literature

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA023

Oral Communication

10 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 10)

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

Optional

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA004

Language in Context

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA011

Writing in History

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA023

Oral Communication

10 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

 

Part B - Degree Modules 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

Candidates may apply to the Programme Director for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester only during Part B of the degree programme.

Candidates who register for the Erasmus exchange programme must undertake the placement in place of one semester at Part B of the degree programme. Students must register for a total of 60 credits in English and Drama in addition to the 60-credit Semester Abroad module.

There are no compulsory modules in Part B.

 Drama Component

Candidates must normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 80 credits.

Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

 Optional

 EAB155

 Brecht: The Critical Stage

 20 credits

EAB910

Devised Theatre

20 credits

EAB917

Media Performance

20 credits

EAB505

Movement in Performance

20 credits

EAB918

Revolt Against Fate: Literature and Theatre of the Absurd

20 credits

EAB009

Theatre, Nation and Trauma: Contemporary Irish Drama

20 credits

 EAB101

Study Abroad

 60 credits

  

Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB920

Performing the Absurd (pre-requisite EAB918)

20 credits 

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB004

World Theatres

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

English Component 

Candidates must normally choose optional modules with a total modular weight of 40 across the year.

  Semester 1

 Compulsory - NONE

 Optional

EAB001

British Drama 1576-1737

20 credits

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Writing

20 credits

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB102

American Adaptations

20 credits

EAB040

New Woman Writing of the Fin de Siecle

20 credits

  Semester 2

 Compulsory - NONE

 Optional

EAB008

Victorian Literature

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB035

The Weird Tale

20 credits

EAB060

American Nightmare

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB018

Women’s Writing in the 17th Century

20 credits

  

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C - Degree Modules 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

There are no compulsory modules in Part C.

 Drama component

Candidates must normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 80.

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

 Research Project

 40 credits

 Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAC221

The Applied Drama Toolkit

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

EAB504

Theatre of the Fantastic

20 credits

 Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice (if not taken in semester 1)

40 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAB912

Costume Design (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

EAC908

Gender and the Stage

20 credits 

English component

Candidates must normally choose optional modules with a total modular weight of 40 across the year.

 

Optional

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

 Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC012

America at War

20 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAC042

Dimensions of Texts: An Introduction to Systemic Functional Linguistics

20 credits

EAC713

A Certain Glory: How to Write Poetry Now

20 credits

EAC806

The Child and the Book

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

20 credits

EAC227

Myth and History: Milton’s Paradise Lost

20 credits

EAC034

Narratives of American Sport

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

EAC808

Publishers, Authors and Agents

20 credits

EAC024

The Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

  Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (is not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAC103

Modernisms

20 credits 

EAC229

Neo-Victorianism

20 credits

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

EAC714

One True Senctence: Writing Fiction

20 credits

EAC104

Aphra Behn and her Contemporaries

20 credits 

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC022

Ulysses

20 credits

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- in order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

A BA (Hons) English and Drama (2015 to 2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English and Drama
Programme code EAUB06
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code QW34 / Q3W4
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishanddrama/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama, and develop an understanding of the social and cultural significance of English literature;
  • to enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in English and Drama through specialist study and research;
  • to stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in both subjects. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance
  • The English Benchmark statement
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • A knowledge of classical and contemporary Drama; a significant knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800.  
  • An understanding and practical experience of a range of research and critical methods in English and Drama studies; a capability of comparing theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically.
  • An appreciation of social and cultural diversity.
  • The ability to understand the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in the subject areas.
  • An understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama, and of the structure and functions of the English language.  
  • They should also have an understanding of the power of imagination in literary creation and of the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary and performance studies.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students will have acquired:

  • critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts and will have a thorough understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to English and Drama studies;
  • the ability to articulate arguments in speech, writing and other forms.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • present cogent and persuasive arguments in oral, written and practical form;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral, written and performed communications;
  • locate and retrieve information using a variety of research methods;
  • they should be able to design and perform practical projects individually and in groups.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  • participate effectively in group work using communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation;
  • demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

4. Programme structure

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

 Candidates must choose 20 credits of optional English modules in Semester 2 so that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year. All of the 60 Drama credits are compulsory

 Drama Component

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAA915

Performance Practices

20 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA912

The Theatre and its Histories

20 credits

EAA914

From Analysis to Performance

20 credits

 

English Component

 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

20 credits

EAA700

Narrative Forms and Fiction

20 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA200

How to do things with Digital Texts

20 credits

EAA701

Literary and Critical Theories

20 credits

 4.2 Part B - Degree Modules

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

Candidates may apply to the Programme Director for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester only during Part B of the degree programme.

Candidates who register for the Erasmus exchange programme must undertake the placement in place of one semester at Part B of the degree programme.  Students must register for a total of 60 credits in English and Drama in addition to the 60 credit Semester Abroad module.

Drama Component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 60 credits but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of Drama credits to be accumulated at Part B is 40.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage 20 credits

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB922

Popular Theatres  

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB930

Performance Philosophy

20 credits

Optional

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy 20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 English Component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 60 credits but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of English credits to be accumulated at Part B is 40.

*Students must take at least one module from the four available compulsory modules listed.

 Semester 1

 Compulsory (total modular weight 20) 

 

EAB710

 

Renaissance Writings*

 

20 credits

EAB008

Victorian Literature*

20 credits

Optional

 

 

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture

20 credits

EAB035

The Weird Tale

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

 

 Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature*

20 credits

EAB712

Modernisms*

20 credits

Optional

EAB017

America at War

20 credits

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB018

Women's Writing in the Seventeenth Century

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

Interdisciplinary Arts options also available in Semester 2:

Candidates may choose to take a module in the following list in place of a module in their main subject area(s).

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  •  History of Art, Architecture and Design
  •  Visual Culture
  •  Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Literature, and Culture
  • Publishing

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

SAB938

Arts Management

20 credits

EAB912

Costume Design

20 credits

SAB935

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

SAB934

Fashion Theory

20 credits

EAB809

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

SAB933

Material Culture

20 credits

SAB929

19th Century Bodies

20 credits

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

20 credits

SAB937

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

20 credits

SAB939

Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchange in Art and Literature

20 credits

4.3 Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

4.4 Part C - Degree Modules

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.  In accordance with University Regulations, students should take at least 90 credits of C-coded modules in their final year of study.

 Drama component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 60 but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework.  The minimum number of Drama credits to be accumulated at Part C is 40.

 Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

Research Project*

40 credits

Semester 1

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

  

 Semester 2

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

 *Students may choose whether to take Dissertation in English or Research Project in Drama but may not choose both. They do not have to choose either.

 English component

Candidates must normally choose optional modules with a total modular weight of 60 across the year. The minimum number of English credits to be accumulated at Part C is 40.


Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC009

 

Dissertation*

40 credits

Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC314

Maps and Motors: The Writing Portfolio

20 credits

EAC002

The Return of the King: Literature 1689-1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits 

   


Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC701

Global America 20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815-1832

20 credits 

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

20 credits 

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

 *Students may choose whether to take Dissertation in English or Research Project in Drama but may not choose both. They do not have to choose either.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of a degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English and Drama (2012 to 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English and Drama
Programme code EAUB06
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code QW34 / Q3W4
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishanddrama/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of Drama, and develop an understanding of the social and cultural significance of English literature;
  • to enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in English and Drama through specialist study and research;
  • to stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in both subjects. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Dance, Drama and Performance
  • The English Benchmark statement
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • A knowledge of classical and contemporary Drama; a significant knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800.  
  • An understanding and practical experience of a range of research and critical methods in English and Drama studies; a capability of comparing theatre institutions, structures and practices historically and geographically.
  • An appreciation of social and cultural diversity.
  • The ability to understand the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in the subject areas.
  • An understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama, and of the structure and functions of the English language.  
  • They should also have an understanding of the power of imagination in literary creation and of the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary and performance studies.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students will have acquired:

  • critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts and will have a thorough understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to English and Drama studies;
  • the ability to articulate arguments in speech, writing and other forms.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • present cogent and persuasive arguments in oral, written and practical form;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral, written and performed communications;
  • locate and retrieve information using a variety of research methods;
  • they should be able to design and perform practical projects individually and in groups.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  • participate effectively in group work using communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation;
  • demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

4. Programme structure

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

 Candidates must choose 20 credits of optional English modules and 10 credits of optional Drama modules in Semester 2 so that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.

 Drama Component

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA145

Performance, Stage and Management

20 credits

EAA143

Philosophising Performance

10 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAA146

Textual and Historical Studies

20 credits

Optional

EAA013

Non-Western Performance

10 credits

EAA147

Textual Studies

10 credits

 

English Component

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 10)

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

Optional (total modular weight 20)

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA004

Language in Context

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA011

Writing in History

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

 4.2 Part B - Degree Modules

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.

Candidates may apply to the Programme Director for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester only during Part B of the degree programme.

Candidates who register for the Erasmus exchange programme must undertake the placement in place of one semester at Part B of the degree programme.  Students must register for a total of 60 credits in English and Drama in addition to the 60 credit Semester Abroad module.

Drama Component

Candidates must normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 60 credits.


Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB155

Brecht: The Critical Stage

20 credits

EAB910

Devised Theatre

20 credits

EAB917

Media Performance

20 credits

EAB505

Movement in Performance 20 credits

EAB918

Revolt Against Fate: Literature and Theatre of the Absurd 20 credits

EAB009

Theatre, Nation and Trauma: Contemporary Irish Drama

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB704

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

20 credits

EAB920

Performing the Absurd (pre-requisite EAB918)

20 credits

EAB904

Playwriting and Dramaturgy

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (also available at Part C)

20 credits

EAB034

Voice and Text

20 credits

EAB004

World Theatres

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

English Component

Candidates must normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 60 credits.

*Students must take EITHER EAB001 in Semester 1 OR EAB008 in Semester 2. 

 

Semester 1

 Compulsory (total modular weight 20) 

 

EAB001

 

British Drama 1576-1737*

 

20 credits

Optional

 

 

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Writing

20 credits

EAB102

American Adaptations 

20 credits 

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB040

New Woman Writing of the Fin de Siecle

20 credits 

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

 

 Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB008

Victorian Literature*

20 credits

Optional

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB035

The Weird Tale

20 credits

EAB0610

American Nightmare

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines : An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB018

Women's Writing in the 17th Century

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

4.3 Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

4.4 Part C - Degree Modules

 

Candidates normally attempt 60 credits in each semester, accumulating 120 credit units over the year.  In accordance with University Regulations, students should take at least 90 credits of C-coded modules in their final year of study.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

  • Performance and Theatre Practice

  • Theoretical, Technical and Historical Drama

  • Costume, Puppetry and Set Design

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Drama component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 60 but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework.  The minimum number of Drama credits to be accumulated at Part C is 40.

 

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC950

Research Project*

40 credits

Semester 1

Optional

EAC500

Theatre Practice

40 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAB033

Puppetry (cannot be taken if completed at Part B)

20 credits

  

 Semester 2

Optional

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries (if not taken in semester 1)

20 credits

EAC225

Dance Theatre

20 credits

 *Students may choose whether to take Dissertation in English or Research Project in Drama but may not choose both. They do not have to choose either.

 

English component

Candidates normally choose modules from the following list with a total modular weight of 60 but may take fewer in accordance with the University's Credit Framework. The minimum number of English credits to be accumulated at Part C is 40.


Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC009

 

Dissertation*

40 credits

Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC314

Maps and Motors: The Writing Portfolio

20 credits

EAC002

The Return of the King: Literature 1689-1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits 

   


Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women of the 1890s 20 credits

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC701

Global America 20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815-1832

20 credits 

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

 *Students may choose whether to take Dissertation in English or Research Project in Drama but may not choose both. They do not have to choose either.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of a degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English (f/t) (2015 to 2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DIntS + DPS
Programme title Single Honours English
Programme code EAUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend either: an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or: an approved study at a University abroad leading to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before the commencement of Part C.
UCAS code Q300, Q301
Admissions criteria

AAB/ABB

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/english/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The programme seeks to:

  • encourage in students a sense of enthusiasm for the study of English and foster engagement with reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;
  • encourage students to reflect critically upon acts of writing and reading in English, and on the history of textual production and reception;
  • promote understanding of verbal creativity and appreciation of the aesthetic features of literary and non-literary texts;
  • enable students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  • instil in students advanced competence in oral and written communication;
  • develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The English Benchmark Statement

  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

  • SEEC Level Descriptors

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction,poetry,drama and otherkinds of writing and communication;

 a range of authorsand texts from different periods of history,including those before 1800;

 the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

 the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and the importance of the linguistic,literary,cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

 the appropriate and precise use ofcritical,linguistic and stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its theorization;

how literature and language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of the English language and of its regional and global varieties;

 the discipline’s relationship to other disciplines and forms of knowledge.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 use critical skills in the close reading and analysis oftexts;

  show sensitivity to generic conventions and to the shaping effectson communication of circumstances,authorship,textualproduction and intended audience;

 demonstrate awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature of language and literature;

 show understanding of the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

  appreciate of the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

  rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;

   where appropriate, demonstrate the use of theories and techniques of writing in their own creative work.

 

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 present cogent and persuasive arguments bot hin written and oral form and be able to respond to a range of texts through creative or analytical writing;

 critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communication.

 demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including the ability to access,work with and evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgment through critical or creative practice;

 deploy a broad range of critical vocabulary and appropriate theoretical terminology;

 demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventions in the presentation of work.

 

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to    

demonstrate advanced literacyand communicationskills;

 demonstrate advanced analyticalskills and be able to handle complex informationin a structured and systematic way;

 understand and be able to interrogate and apply a varietyof theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

 show thecapacity to adapt and transfer the critical methods of the discipline to a variety of working environments;

 show their ability to initiate and take responsibility for their own work;

 work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;

 demonstrate high-level ITskills and the abilityt oa ccess,work with and evaluate electronic resources;

 demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

 

 

4. Programme structure

  • All modules are 20 credits except for the Part C Dissertation module which is a 40 credit weighting.

  • Optional module titles are indicative of the options typically offered on the programmes, subject to availability and timetable permitting.

  • Students may, by following appropriate academic advice, pursue specialist areas of interest through their degree programme.

  • Students may select modules (with a total weighting of 20 credits) from those listed in the School Catalogue or the University’s Module Catalogue subject to approval by the School.

     Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100)

 Semester One (60 Credits)

Semester Two (40 Credits)

EAA700

Narrative Forms and Fiction

EAA011

Writing in History

EAA102

Introduction to Language

EAA701

Literary and Critical Theories

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry

 

Optional Modules In semester two, in addition to the above compulsory modules, the student must choose a 20 credit optional module. 

 

Semester Two (20 Credits)

EAA200

How to Do Things With Digital Texts

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

 

 

Part B

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 – 20 credits per semester)

For each semester, students must choose at least one module from the modules listed below.  One of these must be a pre-1800 module and one must be a post-1800 module.

 Semester One (Min. 20 Credits)

Semester Two (Min. 20 Credits)

EAB710

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

EAB008                                                                  

Victorian Literature (post-1800)

EAB712

Modernisms   (post-1800)

 

Optional Modules

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One

Semester Two

 

 

EAB020

Diverse Voices

EAB039

Nineteenth Century American Literature and Culture

EAB017

America at War

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

EAB016

Language in Society

EAB035

Weird Tale

EAB018

Women's Writing in the Seventeenth Century

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

EAB710

Renaissance Writings (if not taken as a compulsory)

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (if not taken as a compulsory)

EAB008

Victorian Literature  (if not taken as a compulsory)

EAB712

Modernisms   (if not taken as a compulsory)

  Interdisciplinary Arts Module Options

 

Students may choose to take one module from the following list in place of an English optional module. 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Litereature and Culture
  • Publishing

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

 

Semester Two

 

 

 

SAB933

Material Culture

SAB935

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

SAB929

19th Century Bodies

SAB937

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies.

SAB938

Arts Management

SAB934

Fashion Theory

SAB939

Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchange in Art and Literature

EAB012

African American Culture 

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

EAB912

Costume Design

EAB809

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

Part I 

DPS Route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

(total modular weight 120)

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement (DPS, non-credit bearing)

120 credits

OR

DIntS Route

Semesters 1 and 2

(total modular weight 120)

EAI002

Work Placement (DIntS, non-credit bearing)

120 credits

Students choosing to undertake the study abroad or exchange options in Part B will only be allowed to additionally participate in an assistantship or placement in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Department. 

Participation in placement is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory academic performance during Parts A and B.  Registration on the module EU1002 will be at the discretion of the Department of Politics, International Relations and European Studies. 

Part C

NB Students are advised through academic guidance to select a Dissertation topic that reflects their specialist interests.

 Compulsory Modules

 Semester One

Semester Two

EAC009

Dissertation (year-long, 40 credit module)

 

 

 

 Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 credits)

Part C Students can choose a maximum of 20 credits from modules available at Part B

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One

Semester Two

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

EAC314

 

Maps and Motors

EAC701

Global America

EAC440

 

The Modern Poet

EAC001

 

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

 

 

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B: 40%, Part C: 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English (f/t) (2012 to 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DIntS + DPS
Programme title English
Programme code EAUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, full-time (three-year programme) or eight semesters, full-time (four-year programme). Candidates undertaking the DIntS route will be required to spend the third academic year (Part I) undertaking an approved assistantship at a school or other approved placement in a French-, German- or Spanish-speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. It should be noted that students undertaking a teaching assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Candidates following the four-year thick sandwich programme leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). Candidates following this four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of DPS. The sandwich year (Part I) msut be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code Q300
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/english/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Department seeks to

  • encourage in its students a sense of enthusiasm for the subject and a full understanding of its social and cultural significance
  • develop the ability of students to think creatively, to read critically and to be both sensitive and disciplined in their approach to their studies
  • educate its students to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.
  • The 4 year industrial placement option allows students to explore and apply language skills acquired during their teaching within a foreign environment and culture, becoming more fluent and confident in speaking their chosen second language.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The English Benchmark Statement
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  • substantial knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800;
  • an understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama, and an appreciation of the structure and functions of the English language;
  • an awareness of the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history and a knowledge of the linguistic, literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;
  • the ability to deploy useful and precise critical terminology;
  • an appreciation of the power of imagination in literary creation and have an awareness of the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study. 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students will have acquired:

  • critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts and will have a thorough understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to English studies;
  • an appreciation of the central role of language in the creation of meaning and will have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;
  • bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline and will be practised in the accurate citation of sources and in the use of conventions in the presentation of scholarly work.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communications;
  • demonstrate advanced and effective research skills, including the ability to access and assess electronic data.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should

  • possess advanced analytical skills and should be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way
  • communicate effectively and work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions
  • understand and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions, and should be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives
  • possess effective organisational and time-management skills

4. Programme structure

Candidates may apply to the Head of Department for permission to undertake study abroad at Acadia University, Canada, or the National University of Singapore.  Candidates can apply to take a single semester abroad. The study abroad option would be in place of study at Loughborough for either a single semester during Part B of the degree programme.

 Candidates may apply to the Head of Department for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can apply to take a single semester abroad. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester during Part B of the degree programme.

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules taught by departments other than English and Drama.

Candidates may choose optional modules so as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year 

 

 Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

Optional

EAA006

Introduction to American Literature

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA145

Performance, Stage and Management

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA023

Oral Communication

10 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to the Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

Semester 2

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

10 credits

EAA011

Writing in History

20 credits

Optional

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA004

Language in Context

20 credits

EAA023

Oral Communication

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to the Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

 

4.2 Part B - Degree Modules

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules offered to Single Honours Drama students if they have taken pre-requisite modules, or from modules taught by departments other than English and Drama.

Candidates may choose optional modules so that as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.

Candidates who register for the Erasmus exchange programme or the Departmental exchange with Acadia University in Canada, National University of Singapore, Delaware USA or Virginia Tech USA, must undertake the placement in place of one semester at Part B of the degree programme. For one semester, students must register for a total of 60 credits in English and Drama in addition to the 60-credit Semester Abroad module EAB101.  Students who cannot take equivalent modules in place of Part B compulsory modules are required to take EAB001 or EAB008 as part of their Part C credits. 

 

 Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB001

 British Drama 1576-1737

20 credits

Optional

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Writing

20 credits

EAB040

New Women’s Writing

20 credits

 

EAB102

American Adaptations

 20 credits

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB918

Revolt Against Fate: Literature and Theatre of the Absurd

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 


Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB008

Victorian Literature

20 credits

Optional

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB060

 American Nightmare

 20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB018

Women’s Writing in the 17th Century

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth Century Literature

20 credits

EAB035

Weird Tale

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 4.3 Part I 

DPS Route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

(total modular weight 120)

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement (DPS, non-credit bearing)

120 credits

OR

DIntS Route

Semesters 1 and 2

(total modular weight 120)

EUI002

Work Placement (DIntS, non-credit bearing)

120 credits

Students choosing to undertake the study abroad or exchange options in Part B will only be allowed to additionally participate in an assistantship or placement in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Department. 

Participation in placement is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory academic performance during Parts A and B.  Registration on the module EU1002 will be at the discretion of the Department of Politics, International Relations and European Studies. 

 4.4 Part C - Degree Modules

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 credits from modules taught by departments other than English and Drama.

Candidates may not choose a total of more than 20 credits in the year that have a prefix of EAB.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

Semester 1

Compulsory (none)

Optional

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual

20 credits

EAC314

Maps and Motors

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

  

 Semester 2

 

Optional

EAC001 Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s 20 Credits 

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings

20 Credits

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B: 40%, Part C: 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English (p/t) (2015 and 2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)
Programme title English
Programme code EAUB04
Length of programme The duration of the programme will be 12 semesters. 6-years part-time study.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishpart-time/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The programme seeks to:

  • encourage in students a sense of enthusiasm for the study of English and foster engagement with reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;
  • encourage students to reflect critically upon acts of writing and reading in English, and on the history of textual production and reception;
  • promote understanding of verbal creativity and appreciation of the aesthetic features of literary and non-literary texts;
  • enable students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  • instil in students advanced competence in oral and written communication;
  • develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The English Benchmark Statement

  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

  • SEEC Level Descriptors

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of…

the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction,poetry,drama and otherkinds of writing and communication;

a range of authors and texts from different periods of history,including those before 1800;

the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and the importance of the linguistic,literary,cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

the appropriate and precise use of critical,linguistic and stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its theorization;

how literature and language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of the English language and of its regional and global varieties;

the discipline’s relationship to other disciplines and forms of knowledge.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

 

use critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts;

show sensitivity to generic conventions and to the shaping effects on communication of circumstances,authorship,textual production and intended audience;

demonstrate awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature of language and literature;

show understanding of the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

appreciate of the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;

where appropriate, demonstrate the use of theories and techniques of writing in their own creative work.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form and be able to respond to a range of texts through creative or analytical writing;

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communication.

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including the ability to access,work with and evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgment through criticalor creativepractice;

deploy a broad range of critical vocabulary and appropriate theoretical terminology;

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventionsin the presentation of work.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

demonstrate advanced literacy and communication skills;

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

show the capacity to adapt and transfer the critical methods of the discipline to a variety of working environments;

show their ability to initiate and take responsibility for their own work;

work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;

demonstrate high-level ITskills and the ability to access,work with and evaluate electronic resources;

demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

4. Programme structure

On the Part-Time English degree programme all students study literature from a historical perspective, as well as developing specialisms within their areas of interest, with the help of structured academic guidance and Personal Tutee mentoring at all levels of study. The programme is structured to provide students at Part A with core knowledge and skills that are necessary for their whole degree. This material is delivered through compulsory modules; every student has a grounding in literary history, the study of language, and critical theory (as well as exposure to specialist options such as creative writing or American Studies). In Part B, in compliance with the English Benchmark Statement, all students choose a module that addresses pre-eighteenth century and post-eighteenth century literature and its contexts. They may, also with academic guidance, develop specialisms through optional modules. Where students have selected a specialist route, at Part C, they are strongly advised to choose a dissertation topic in their specific area of interest, and a range of optional modules also allow them to complete a portfolio degree in their chosen specialism.

  • Students will be required to complete 60 credits per academic year, across semester one and two.  Each Part will be completed in two academic years.

    Part A

    Year One

    Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 credits, to be completed in semester one)

Semester One (40 Credits)

 

 

EAA700 (20)

Narrative Forms and Fiction

EAA102 (20)

Introduction to Language

Optional Modules In addition, students must choose 20 optional credits in semester two.

 

Semester Two (20 Credits)

 

EAA006 (20)

Introduction to American Literature

EAA001 (20)

Introduction to Film Studies

EAA004 (20)

Language in Context

 

EAA443 (20)

Discourse Analysis

Year Two

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 60 credits)

Semester One (20 credits) 

Semester Two (40 credits)

EAA104 (20)

Introduction to Poetry

EAA011 (20)

Writing in History

 

EAA701  (20)

Literary and Critical Theories

       

Part B

Year One

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 credits)

For each semester, students must choose at least one module from the four modules listed below. One of these must be a pre-1800 module and one must be a post-1800 module.

Semester One(Min. 20 Credits)

Semester Two(Min. 20 Credits)

 

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

EAB008 (20)                             

Victorian Literature  (post-1800)                        

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms (post-1800)     

 Optional Modules

In addition, students must choose 20 optional credits in semester one.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

 

 

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature (if not a chosen compulsory)    

EAB020 (20)

Diverse Voices

EAB039 (20)

Nineteenth Century American Writing

EAB113 (20)

Introduction to Linguistics

EAB040 (20)

New Woman Writing

EAB154 (20)

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

EAB102 (20)

American Adaptations

EAB035 (20)

Weird Tale

School-Wide Module Options

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One

Semester Two

 

 

 

SAB933 (20)

Textile Futures 

 

SAB935 (20)

Art, Activism and Society

SAB936 (20)

Urban Visual Culture

SAB937 (20)

Wearable words, artefacts and new technologies

SAB938 (20)

Arts Management 

EAB704 (20)

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

EAB912 (20)

Costume Design

 

EAB808 (20)

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

Year 2

Students must choose an additional 60 credits of optional modules in Part B, year two.  

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

Semester Two

 

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (if not a chosen Compulsory or Optional in Year One)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature (if not a chosen Compulsory or Optional in Year One)    

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms (if not a chosen compulsory)

 

EAB114 (20)

Elephants and Engines

EAB012 (20)

African American Culture

EAB050 (20)

Philosophy, Literature and the Visual Arts

EAB110 (20)

Introduction to Multimodality

EAB016 (20)

Language in Society

EAB018 (20)

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

EAB060 (20)

American Nightmare

Part C

Year One

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 credits)

NB Students are advised through academic guidance to select a Dissertation topic that reflects their specialist interests. Students can choose to take dissertation in Year One or Year Two of Part C.

Semester One

 

Semester Two

Dissertation (year-long, 40 credit module)

Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 OR 60 credits per year. Total modular weight for year one and two 80 credits)

Students may not take an optional module more than once.

If students have chosen to do Dissertation in Year One they must choose an additional 20 optional credits in semester one. The following are indicative of the optional modules typically offered on the programme (This will include ‘Analysing Work Experience’, which is limited to work placements and recruits approx. 6 students per semester).

If students have chosen to take Dissertation in Year Two they must choose 60 optional credits across semester one and semester two.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

 

Semester Two

EAC034 (20)

Narratives of American Sport

EAC229 (20)

Neo-Victorianism

EAC227(20)

Myth and History: Milton’s Paradise Lost

EAC300 (20)

Rare Shakespeare

EAC012(20)

America at War

EAC022 (20)

Ulysses

EAC016(20)

Cruel and Unusual

EAC701 (20)

Global America

EAC713(20)

 

A Certain Glory: How to Write Poetry Now

EAC714 (20)

 

One True Sentence: Writing Fiction

EAC440 (20)

 

The Modern Poet

EAC104 (20)

Aphra Behn and her Contemporaries

EAC042(20)

Dimensions of Texts

EAC900 (20)

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

EAC024 (20)

Writings of Intimacy

EAC229 (20)

Neo-Victorianism

EAC900 (20)

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

 

 

Year Two (total modular weight 20 OR 60 credits)

Optional Modules

If students have chosen to chosen to do Dissertation in Year Two they must choose an additional 20 optional credits in semester one.

If students have chosen to take Dissertation in Year One they must choose 60 optional credits across semester one and semester two.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

 

Semester Two

EAC034 (20)

Narratives of American Sport

EAC229 (20)

Neo-Victorianism

EAC227(20)

Myth and History: Milton’s Paradise Lost

EAC300 (20)

Rare Shakespeare

EAC012(20)

America at War

EAC022 (20)

Ulysses

EAC016(20)

Cruel and Unusual

EAC701 (20)

Global America

EAC713(20)

 

A Certain Glory: How to Write Poetry Now

EAC714 (20)

 

One True Sentence: Writing Fiction

EAC440 (20)

 

The Modern Poet

EAC104 (20)

Aphra Behn and her Contemporaries

EAC042(20)

Dimensions of Texts

EAC900 (20)

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

EAC024 (20)

Writings of Intimacy

EAC229 (20)

Neo-Victorianism

EAC900 (20)

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules and successfully complete and pass the 10% assessment component in Academic Guidance and Professional Development in the modules EAA700 and EAA701.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English (p/t) (2005 to 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)
Programme title English
Programme code EAUB04
Length of programme The duration of the programme will be not less than eight semesters and not more than 14.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishpart-time/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The aims of the provision are generally in accord with the Subject Benchmark Statement for English. The Department seeks to encourage in its students a sense of enthusiasm for the subject and a full understanding of its social and cultural significance. It sees the study of English as a means of developing the ability of students to think creatively, to read critically and to be both sensitive and disciplined in their approach to their studies. Our graduates are trained to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives and to analyse critically different forms of discourse. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The English Benchmark Statement
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • substantial knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800;
  • an understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama, and should have an appreciation of  the structure and functions of the English language;
  • an awareness of the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history and a knowledge of the linguistic, literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;
  • the ability to deploy useful and precise critical terminology;
  • an appreciation of the power of imagination in literary creation and have an awareness of the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study. 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students will have acquired:

  • critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts and will have a thorough understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to English studies;
  • an appreciation of the central role of language in the creation of meaning and will have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;
  • bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline and will be practised in the accurate citation of sources and in the use of conventions in the presentation of scholarly work.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communications;
  • demonstrate advanced and effective research skills, including the ability to access and assess electronic data.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should possess advanced analytical skills and should be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way. They should be able to communicate effectively and work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions.

They should be able to understand and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions, and should be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives. They should possess effective organisational and time-management skills. 

4. Programme structure

Although open to revision, students should identify in their first year a plan of when they intend to undertake the necessary modules up to graduation.

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules 

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 50)

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

EAA141

Tutorial Course (Year One) 1

20 credits

EAA142

Tutorial Course (Year Two) 3

20 credits

Optional*

EAA006

Introduction to American Literature

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA023

Oral Communication

20 credits

EAA145

Performance, Stage and Management

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

 Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

EAA241

Tutorial Course (Year One) 2

20 credits

Optional *

EAA011

Writing in History

20 credits

EAA701

Literary and Critical Theories

20 credits

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

20 credits

*In addition to their compulsory modules, candidates will also take modules with a total weight of 40 from the available optional modules. 

4.2 Part B - Degree Modules

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules taught by departments other than English and Drama. 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB008

Victorian Literature

20 credits

Optional

EAB710

Renaissance Writings

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth Century American Literature and Culture

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB035      

Weird Tale

20 credits

 

 Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB712

Modernisms

20 credits

 Optional

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature 

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines

20 credits

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB050

Philosophy, Literature and the Visual Arts

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society

20 credits

EAB018

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

20 credits

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB017

America at War

20 credits

 4.3 Part C - Degree Modules

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates may choose module(s) with a total weight of 20 from modules taught by departments other than English and Drama. 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 


Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

 Semester 1

Compulsory (None)

Optional

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual

20 credits

EAC314

Maps and Motors

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

 
Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

20 credits

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

20 credits

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English and American Studies (2015 and 2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English and American Studies
Programme code EAUB08
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend either: an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or: an approved study at a University abroad leading to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before the commencement of Part C.
UCAS code Q3T7
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishandamericanstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

 

The programme seeks to:

 

  • encourage in students a sense of enthusiasm for both English and American Studies and foster engagement with verbal and visual cultures through a broad and diverse curriculum;
  • encourage students to reflect critically upon acts of writing and reading in English, and on the history of textual production and reception;
  • promote understanding of verbal and visual creativity and appreciation of the aesthetic features of literary and non-literary texts;
  • enable students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  •  instil in students advanced competence in oral and written communication;
  • develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

 

  • The English Benchmark Statement

  • Area Studies Benchmark Statement

  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

  • SEEC Level Descriptors

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of…

 The distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry, drama and other kinds of writing and communication;

 the defining attributes of American film and other forms of American visual culture;

 the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production, especially film;

 a range of authors and texts from different periods of history, including those before 1800;

 the role of critical traditions in shaping literary and cinematic history, and the importance of the linguistic, literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature and film are produced and consumed;

 the appropriate and precise use ofcritical,linguisticand stylisticterminology;

 the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary and cinematic study, which may include creative practice and its theorisation;

 how literature and language produce and reflect cultural change;

 the structure and functions of the English language and of its regional and global varieties;

 the history, theory and practice of American Studies, and the relationship of this interdisciplinary field to other disciplines and forms of knowledge.

 

 

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

 

 

use critical skills in the close reading and analysis of verbal and visual texts;

 

show sensitivity to generic conventions and to the shaping effects on communication of circumstances, authorship, textual production and intended audience;

 

demonstrate awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature of language, literature and visual culture;

 

show understanding of the critical and theoretical models that apply to English and American studies;

 

appreciate the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

 

demonstrate use of rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;

 

where appropriate, demonstrate the use of theories and techniques of writing in their own creative work.

 

 

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

 

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form and be able to respond to a range of texts through creative or analytical writing;

 

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral, written and visual communications;

 

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills, including the ability to access, work with and evaluate digital sources;

 

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgement through critical or creative practice;

 

deploy a broad range of appropriate critical vocabulary and theoretical terminology;

 

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline, and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventions in the presentation of work.

 

 

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

  

demonstrate advanced literacy and communication skills;

 

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;

 

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

show the capacity to adapt and transfer the critical methods of the discipline to a variety of working environments;

show the ability to initiate and take responsibility for their own work;

work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;

demonstrate high-level IT skills and the ability to access, work with and evaluate electronic resources;

demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.
 

 

 

 

4. Programme structure

Part A

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Semester One (40 Credits) 

Semester Two (60 Credits)

EAA700 (20)

Narrative Forms and Fiction

EAA701 (20)

Literary and Critical Theories

EAA511 (20)

Imagining America

EAA006 (20)

Introduction to American Literature

 

EAA001 (20)

Introduction to Film Studies 

 

Optional Modules (In addition to the above compulsory modules, students must choose an additional 20 credit optional module in Semester 1)

Semester One 

 

EAA102 (20) 

Introduction to Language

EAA104 (20) 

Introduction to Poetry

 Part B

Students must choose 120 credits across the year, with no more than 60 credits per semester. Students may take 120 credits in English OR, may choose 100 credits in English and 20 credits from EITHER the Interdisciplinary Arts Module Options OR a module from outside of the School.

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 80 credits)

Semester One (20 Credits)

Semester Two (20 Credits) 

EAB039 (20)

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture

EAB012(20)

African American Culture

 

 

 

 

 In addition, students must choose an additional 20 credits in each semester from the modules below. One must be pre-1800 and one post-1800.

Semester One (Min. 20 Credits)

Semester Two (Min. 20 Credits)

 EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

 EAB008 (20)             

Victorian Literature (post-1800)

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms   (post-1800)

 Optional Modules (total modular weight 40 credits)

In addition to the compulsory modules above, students are required to select 20 credits of optional modules in semester one and 20 credits in semester two.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One 

Semester Two

EAB035 (20)

Weird Tale

EAB020 (20)

Diverse Voices

EAB113 (20)

Introduction to Linguistics

EAB017 (20)

America at War

EAB154 (20)

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

EAB016 (20)

Language in Society

 

 

EAB018 (20)

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Interdisciplinary Arts Module Options

 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Literature and Culture
  • Publishing
In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be

 

Semester Two

 

SAB933 (20)

Material Culture 

SAB935 (20)

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

SAB929 (20)

19th Century Bodies

SAB937 (20)

Non-Verbal Communication:Body Adornment and New Technologies

SAB938 (20)

Arts Management 

SAB934 (20)

Fashion Theory

SAB939 (20)

Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchnage in Art and Literature

EAB114 (20)

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

EAB110 (20)

Introduction to Multimodality

EAB050 (20)

Philosophy, Litereature and the Arts

EAB912 (20)

Costume Design

 

EAB809 (20)

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

 Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) (DiNTS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies.

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement (DPS)

120 credits

 

 

 

 Part C

 Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 60 credits)

Semester One (20 credits) 

Semester Two (40 credits)

EAC217 American Studies Dissertation (year-long, 40 credit module) 

 

EAC701 (20)

Global America 

 

 

 

       

Optional Modules (total modular weight 60 credits)

Students must choose 40 credits in semester one and 20 credits in semester two.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

Semester Two 

EAC002 (20)

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

EAC300 (20)

Rare Shakespeare

EAC016 (20)

Cruel and Unusual

EAC001 (20)

Radicals and Reactionaries:Writing Women in the 1890s

EAC314 (20)

Maps and Motors

EAC024 (20)

 

Writings of Intimacy

EAC440 (20)

The Modern Poet

EAC109 (20)

Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

 

 

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules and successfully complete and pass the 10% assessment component in Academic Guidance and Professional Development in the modules EAA700 and EAA701.

 .2 In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

 .3 To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English and American Studies (2012 to 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English and American Studies
Programme code EAUB08
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code Q3T7
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishandamericanstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Department seeks to encourage in its students:

  • a sense of enthusiasm for the subject and a full understanding of its social and cultural significance.
  • the study of English and American Studies as a means of developing the ability to think creatively, to read critically and to be both sensitive and disciplined in their approach to their studies.
  • to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

English Benchmark Statement

Area Studies Benchmark Statement

University Learning and Teaching Strategy

Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should:

  • have substantial knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800.
  • understand the distinctive characteristics of both English and American Fiction, poetry and drama
  • have an awareness of the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history and a knowledge of the linguistic, literary, cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read.
  • develop an understanding of key aspects of U.S. visual culture, especially in relation to American film
  • deploy useful and precise critical terminology.
  • have an appreciation of the power of imagination in literary creation and an awareness of the range of contemporary approaches to literary and area studies
  •  have an appreciation of American Studies as a multi and interdisciplinary subject area.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme, students will have acquired critical skills in the close reading and analysis of verbal and visual texts and will have a thorough understanding of critical and theoretical models relating to English and American studies. They will have an appreciation of the central role of language in the creation of meaning and will have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument. They will have bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline and will be practised in the accurate citation of sources and in the use of conventions in the presentation of scholarly work.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form. They should be able critically to assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral, visual and written communications. They should possess advanced and effective research skills, including the ability to access and assess electronic data.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should possess advanced analytical skills and should be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way. They should be able to communicate effectively and work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions.

They should be able to understand and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions, and should be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives. They should possess effective organisational and time-management skills. 

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

American Studies Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAA006

Introduction to American Literature

20 credits

Optional - NONE

English Studies Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

 

Optional (10 or 20)

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA023

Oral Communication

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to the Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

American Studies Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA511

Imagining America: An Introduction to American Studies

10 credits

English Studies Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

10 credits

Optional (10 or 20 credits)

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA004

Language in Context

20 credits

EAA023

Oral Communication

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA011

Writing in History

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to the Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part B - Degree Modules

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates should register for a minimum of 40 credits in both English Studies and American Studies.

Candidates may choose optional modules so that as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.

Candidates may apply to the Head of Department for permission to undertake study abroad at Acadia University, Canada or the National University of Singapore. Candidates can apply to take a single semester abroad. The study abroad option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester during Part B of the degree programme.

Candidates may apply to the Head of Department for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can apply to take a single semester abroad. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for a single semester during Part B of the degree programme.

Candidates who register for the Erasmus exchange programme must undertake the placement in place of one semester at Part B of the degree programme. For one semester, students must register for a total of 60 credits in English and Drama in addition to the 60-credit Semester Abroad module EAB101.

 American Studies Semester 1

 Compulsory (total modular weight 20 )

 EAB039

 Nineteenth-Century American Writing

 20 credits

 Optional

EAB102

American Adaptations

 20 credits

 English Studies Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

 EAB001

British Drama 1576-1737

 20 credits

Optional

EAB154

 Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20credits

EAB918

Revolt Against Fate: Literature and Theatre of the Absurd

20credits

 EAB040

New Women’s Writing

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits 

 

 

 

  American Studies Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB012

 African American Culture

20 credits

Optional

 EAB060

American Nightmare

20 credits 

 English Studies Semester 2

Compulsory - NONE

Optional

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

 

 

 

EAB008 

 Victorian Literature

20 credits 

EAB018

Women's Writing in the 17th Century

20 credits

EAB035

Weird Tale

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB101 

Study Abroad 

 60 credits

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies.

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

 Part C - Degree Modules

In the course of Semester 1 and Semester 2, candidates should register for a minimum of 40 credits in both English Studies and American Studies.

Candidates may not choose a total of more than 30 credits in the year that have a prefix of EAB.

 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

 

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

 

 

American Studies Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAC217

American Studies Dissertation

40credits

American Studies Semester 1

Compulsory  - NONE

Optional - NONE

English Studies Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

 

 

 

Optional

EAC034

Narratives of American Sport

20 credits

EAC227

Myth and History: Milton’s Paradise Lost

20 credits

EAC012

America at War

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual

20 credits

EAC713

A Certain Glory: How to Write Poetry Now

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

EAC042

Dimensions of Texts

20 credits

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC900

Analysing Work Experience in the Creative Industries

20 credits

EAC806

The Child and the Book

20 credits

EAC808

Publishers, Authors and Agents

20 credits

American Studies Semester 2

Compulsory  (total modular weight 20)

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

Optional - NONE

English Studies Semester 2

Compulsory  - (total modular weight 20)

EAC103

Modernisms

20 credits

 

 

 

Optional - NONE

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

 .2 In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

 .3 To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English with Business Studies (2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS + DINTS
Programme title English with Business Studies
Programme code EAUB12
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code Q3N1
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishwithaminorinbusinessstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The programme seeks to:

  • encourage in students a sense of enthusiasm for the study of English and foster engagement with reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;
  • encourage students to reflect critically upon acts of writing and reading in English, and on the history of textual production and reception;
  • promote understanding of verbal creativity and appreciation of the aesthetic features of literary and non-literary texts;
  • enable students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  • instil in students advanced competence in oral and written communication;
  • develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme;
  • to ensure that graduates are trained to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives, and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

 

  • The English Benchmark Statement

  • The Benchmark Statement for General Business and Management

  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

  • SEEC Level Descriptors

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of…

 

English

the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction,poetry,drama and other kinds of writing and communication;

a range of authors and texts from different periods of history,including those before 1800;

the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and the importance of the linguistic,literary,cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

the appropriate and precise use of critical,linguistic and stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its theorization;

how literature and language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of the English language and of its regional and global varieties;

the discipline’s relationship toother disciplines and forms of knowledge.

 

Business

an understanding of theories, principles and practice, developed from study of core management areas of human resources, finance, marketing and organisational behaviour;

knowledge of the importance of policy, planning and management in business;

the behaviour, management and development of people within organisations.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

 

use criticalskills in theclose reading and analysis oftexts;

show sensitivity to generic conventions and to thes haping effects on communication of circumstances,authorship,textual production and intended audience;

demonstrate awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature of language and literature;

show understanding of the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

appreciate of the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;

where appropriate, demonstrate the use of theories and techniques of writing in their own creative work.

 

Business

Use critical thinking, analysis and syntheses to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios

Relate theory to practice.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

English

 

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form and be able to respond to a range of texts through creative or analytical writing;

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range oforal and written communication.

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including the ability to access,work with and evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgment through critical or creative practice;

deploy a broad range ofcriticalvocabulary and appropriatetheoreticalterminology;

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to thed iscipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventionsin thepresentationof work.

 

Business

Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources.

c. Key transferable skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

 

demonstrate advanced literacy, numeracy and communication skills;

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex informationin a structured and systematic way;

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

show the capacity to adapt and transfer the critical methods of the discipline to a variety of working environments;

show their ability to initiate and take responsibility for their own work;

work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;

demonstrate high-level ITskills and the ability to access,work with and evaluate electronic resources;

demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

4. Programme structure

 

Part A

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Semester One (40 Credits)

 

Semester Two (60 Credits)

EAA700(20)

Narrative Forms and Fiction

EAA011 (20)

Writing in History

BSA505 (10)

Organisational Behaviour

EAA701 (20)

Literary and Critical Theories

BSA050 (10)

Introduction to Management

BSA506 (10)

Management of Human Resources

 

BSA026 (10)

Principles of Law

 

Optional Modules In addition, students must choose 20 optional credits in semester one. 

Semester One (20 credits)

 

EAA104 (20)

Introduction to Poetry

EAA102 (20)

Introduction to Language

 

Part B

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 50 credits)

In addition to the three compulsory Business modules below, students must choose at least one of the four English modules listed below (20 Credits).

Semester One

Semester Two

 

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature      (post-1800)                        

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms                          (post-1800)   

       
Compulsory Business Modules

 

   

BSB530 (10)

Accounting for Business

BSB562 (10)

The Marketing Mix

BSB560 (10)

Principles of Marketing

 

 

Optional English Modules

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

Semester Two

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature      (post-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory                      

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms                          (post-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory

EAB113 (20)

Introduction to Linguistics

EAB017 (20)

America at War

EAB035 (20)

The Weird Tale

EAB020 (20)

Diverse Voices

EAB039 (20)

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture 

 

 

EAB154 (20)                                        

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare  

 

 

     

   

 

 

 

 

EAB016 (20)

Language in Society *Pre-Requisite: Introduction to Linguistics

 

 

EAB018 (20)

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

 

Optional Business Modules (total modular weight 10 credits)

Students must choose an additional 10 optional credits in semester two from the Business list.

 

Semester Two

BSB532 (10)

Accounting for Managers

BSB550 (10)

Company Finance

 

Interdisciplinary Arts Module Options - Semester Two

 Students may choose to take one Interdisciplinary Arts Module (20 Credits) in place of an optional English module in semester 2.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Literature and Culture
  • Publishing
 In the 2017-2018 academic year the available School-wide modules will be:

SAB933 (20)

Material Culture 

SAB935 (20)

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

SAB929 (20)

19th Century Bodies

SAB937 (20)

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

SAB938 (20)

Arts Management 

SAB934 (20)

Fashion Theory

SAB939 (20)

Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchange in Art and Literature

EAB012 (20) African American Culture

EAB114 (20)

Elephants and Engines

EAB110 (20)

Introduction to Multimodality

EAB050 (20)

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

EAB912(20)

Costume Design

EAB809 (20)

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 credits)

Semester One (20 credits)

 

Semester Two (20 credits)

BSC522 (10)

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

BSC524 (10)

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning

BSC565 (10)

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

BSC575 (10)

Leadership and Interpersonal Skills

 

Optional Modules

Students must choose an additional 80 credits of English modules with 40 credits in semester one and 40 credits in semester two.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One (40 credits)

Semester Two (40 credits)

EAC009 (40)

Dissertation (year-long module)

EAC002 (20)

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

EAC300 (20)

Rare Shakespeare

EAC314 (20)

Maps and Motors

EAC024 (20)

The Writings of Intimacy

 

 

EAC701 (20)

Global America

EAC016 (20)

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

EAC001 (20)

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

EAC440 (20)

The Modern Poet

 EAC109 (20) Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English with a Minor in Business Studies (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS + DINTS
Programme title English with a Minor in Business Studies
Programme code EAUB12
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code Q3N1
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishwithaminorinbusinessstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The programme seeks to:

  • encourage in students a sense of enthusiasm for the study of English and foster engagement with reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;
  • encourage students to reflect critically upon acts of writing and reading in English, and on the history of textual production and reception;
  • promote understanding of verbal creativity and appreciation of the aesthetic features of literary and non-literary texts;
  • enable students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  • instil in students advanced competence in oral and written communication;
  • develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme;
  • to ensure that graduates are trained to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives, and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

 

  • The English Benchmark Statement

  • The Benchmark Statement for General Business and Management

  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

  • SEEC Level Descriptors

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of…

 

English

the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction,poetry,drama and other kinds of writing and communication;

a range of authors and texts from different periods of history,including those before 1800;

the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and the importance of the linguistic,literary,cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

the appropriate and precise use of critical,linguistic and stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its theorization;

how literature and language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of the English language and of its regional and global varieties;

the discipline’s relationship toother disciplines and forms of knowledge.

 

Business

an understanding of theories, principles and practice, developed from study of core management areas of human resources, finance, marketing and organisational behaviour;

knowledge of the importance of policy, planning and management in business;

the behaviour, management and development of people within organisations.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

 

use criticalskills in theclose reading and analysis oftexts;

show sensitivity to generic conventions and to thes haping effects on communication of circumstances,authorship,textual production and intended audience;

demonstrate awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature of language and literature;

show understanding of the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

appreciate of the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;

where appropriate, demonstrate the use of theories and techniques of writing in their own creative work.

 

Business

Use critical thinking, analysis and syntheses to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios

Relate theory to practice.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

English

 

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form and be able to respond to a range of texts through creative or analytical writing;

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range oforal and written communication.

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including the ability to access,work with and evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgment through critical or creative practice;

deploy a broad range ofcriticalvocabulary and appropriatetheoreticalterminology;

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to thed iscipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventionsin thepresentationof work.

 

Business

Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources.

c. Key transferable skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

 

demonstrate advanced literacy, numeracy and communication skills;

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex informationin a structured and systematic way;

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

show the capacity to adapt and transfer the critical methods of the discipline to a variety of working environments;

show their ability to initiate and take responsibility for their own work;

work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;

demonstrate high-level ITskills and the ability to access,work with and evaluate electronic resources;

demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

4. Programme structure

Part A

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Semester One (40 Credits)

 

Semester Two (60 Credits)

EAA700(20)

Narrative Forms and Fiction

EAA011 (20)

Writing in History

BSA505 (10)

Organisational Behaviour

EAA701 (20)

Literary and Critical Theories

BSA050 (10)

Introduction to Management

BSA506 (10)

Management of Human Resources

 

BSA026 (10)

Principles of Law

 

Optional Modules In addition, students must choose 20 optional credits in semester one. 

Semester One (20 credits)

 

EAA104 (20)

Introduction to Poetry

EAA102 (20)

Introduction to Language

 

Part B

It is advisable that, where possible, students choose not more than 60 credits per semester.

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 50 credits)

In addition to the three compulsory Business modules below, students must choose at least one of the four English modules listed below.

Semester One (Min. 20 Credits)

Semester Two (Min. 20 Credits)

 

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature      (post-1800)                        

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms                          (post-1800)   

BSB530 (10)

Accounting for Business

BSB562 (10)

The Marketing Mix

BSB560 (10)

Principles of Marketing

 

 

Optional English Modules (total modular weight 60 credits)

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One

Semester Two

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature      (post-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory                      

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms                          (post-1800) *if not chosen a compulsory

EAB113 (20)

Introduction to Linguistics

EAB110 (20)

Introduction to Multimodality

EAB035 (20)

The Weird Tale

EAB114 (20)

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

EAB039 (20)

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture 

 EAB012 (20)

African American Culture

EAB154 (20)                                        

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare  

 EAB050 (20)

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

EAB102 (20)      

American Adaptations   

EAB060 (20)

American Nightmare

EAB040 (20)

New Woman Writing of the Fin de Siecle

EAB016 (20)

Language in Society *Pre-Requisite: Introduction to Linguistics

EAB020 (20)

Diverse Voices

EAB018 (20)

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

 

Optional Business Modules (total modular weight 10 credits)

Students must choose an additional 10 optional credits in semester two from the Business list. The following modules are indicative of the kinds of modules that will typically be offered on the programme.

 

Semester Two

BSB532 (10)

Accounting for Managers

BSB550 (10)

Company Finance

 

School-Wide Module Options

Students may choose to take one School-Wide module (20 credits) in place of an optional English module in semester 2.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

  •  History of Art, Architecture and Design
  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management

 

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available School-wide modules will be:


Semester Two

SAB933 (20)

Textile Futures 

SAB935 (20)

Art, Activism and Society

SAB936 (20)

Urban Visual Culture

SAB937 (20)

Wearable words, artefacts and new technologies

SAB938 (20)

Arts Management 

EAB912(20)

Costume Design

EAB704(20)

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

EAB808 (20)

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 credits)

Semester One (20 credits)

 

Semester Two (20 credits)

BSC522 (10)

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

BSC524 (10)

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning

BSC565 (10)

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

BSC575 (10)

Leadership and Interpersonal Skills

 

Optional Modules

Students must choose an additional 80 credits of English modules with 40 credits in semester one and 40 credits in semester two.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One (40 credits)

Semester Two (40 credits)

EAC009 (40)

Dissertation (year-long module)

EAC002 (20)

The Return od the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

EAC300 (20)

Rare Shakespeare

EAC314 (20)

Maps and Motors

EAC701 (20)

Global America

EAC016 (20)

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

EAC024 (20)

The Writings of Intimacy

EAC440 (20)

The Modern Poet

 EAC001 Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

 

 

 EAC109 Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

 

 

   

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

 In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English with a Minor in Business Studies (2013 to 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English with a Minor in Business Studies
Programme code EAUB12
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code Q3N1
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishwithaminorinbusinessstudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment prospects by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.
  • To ensure that graduates are trained to think independently, to reason critically, to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives, and to analyse critically different forms of discourse.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The English Benchmark Statement
  • The Benchmark Statement for General Business and Management
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  • Substantial knowledge of a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800.
  • An understanding of the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama, and an appreciation of the structure and functions of the English language.
  • An appreciation of the power of imagination in literary creation and an awareness of the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study.
  • An understanding of theories, principles and practice, developed from study of core management areas of human resources, finance, marketing and organisational behaviour.
  • Knowledge of the importance of policy, planning and management in business.
  • The behaviour, management and development of people within organisations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the central role of language in the creation of meaning, and have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument.
  • Present bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline, and be practised in the accurate citation of sources and in the use of scholarly conventions in the presentation of scholarly work.
  • Use critical thinking, analysis and syntheses to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios.
  • Relate theory to practice.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form
  • Critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communications
  • Demonstrate advanced and effective research skills, including the ability to access and assess electronic data
  • Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have acquired the following generic skills: 

  • Effective communication
  • Effective organisational and time-management skills
  • Effective use of information technology
  • Management of self-development
  • Numeracy skills
  • Effective team-working skills

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules       

Semester 1 English Modules

Compulsory

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

Optional

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

Semester 2 English Modules

Compulsory Students may choose to take either EAA011 or EAA004.  They cannot do both

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

10 credits

EAA011

Writing in History or

20 credits

EAA004

Language in Context

20 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory

BSA505

Organisational Behaviour

10 credits

BSA050

Introduction to Management

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory

BSA506

Management of Human Resources

10 credits

BSA025

Introduction to Law

10 credits

Optional - NONE

 

Part B - Degree Modules

Students should choose a maximum of 40 optional English Credits across the year. Candidates may choose optional modules so that as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year. Only 10 credits of optional Business modules can be taken in semester two.  All other Business modules at Part B are compulsory.

Semester 1 English Modules

Compulsory

EAB001

British Drama 1576-1737

20 credits

Optional

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics 

20 credits 

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Writing

20 credits

 EAB102

American Adaptations 

20 credits 

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB040

New Women’s Writing

20 credits

 

Semester 2 English Modules

Compulsory

EAB008

Victorian Literature

20 credits

Optional

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB060

American Nightmare

 20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

 20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (Pre-requisite EAB113) 

 

EAB018

Women’s Writing in the 17th Century

20 credits

EAB177

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB035

Weird Tale

20 credits

   

Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory (20 credits)

BSB530

Financial Reporting

10 credits

BSB520

Principles of Marketing for Sport and Leisure

10 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory (10 credits)

BSB522

The Marketing Mix for Sport and Leisure

10 credits

Optional  (10 credits)

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10 credits

BSB550

Company Finance

10 credits

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

10 credits

 Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 Part C - Degree Modules

 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semesters 1 and 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 40)

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

Semester 1

Compulsory - NONE

 

 

 

Optional - (total modular weight 20)

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

20 credits

EAC314

Maps and Motors

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semester 1 Business Modules

Compulsory

BSC522

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

10 credits

BSC565

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

10 credits

SEMESTER 2

 

Semester 2 Business Modules

Compulsory

BSC524

Entrepreneurship and Small Business

10 credits

BSC575

Leadership and Interpersonal Skills

10 credits

     
Optional English Modules (Total Modular Weight 20)  
EAC024 Writings of Intimacy 20 credits
EAC001 Radicals and Reactionaries:Writing Women in the 1890s 20 credits
EAC300 Rare Shakespeare 20 credits
EAC109 Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832 20 credits

 

 
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

.3   To be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English and Sport Science (2016 to 2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons). BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English and Sports Science
Programme code EAUB09
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code QC36, Q3C6
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishandsportsscience/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • encourage in students a sense of enthusiasm for the study of English and foster engagement with reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;
  • encourage students to reflect critically upon acts of writing and reading in English, and on the history of textual production and reception;
  • promote understanding of verbal creativity and appreciation of the aesthetic features of literary and non-literary texts;
  • enable students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  • instil in students advanced competence in oral and written communication;
  • develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills;
  • develop students’ understanding of the human responses and adaptations to sport and exercise;
  • provide an understanding of  the historical, social, political , economic and cultural diffusion, distribution and impact of sport in a multi-disciplinary way;
  • encourage students in the pursuit of sport and exercise and its enhancement, monitoring and analysis.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The English Benchmark Statement

  • Hospitality, Leisure Sport and Tourism Benchmark Statement

  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

  • SEEC Level Descriptors

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of

 English

the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction,poetry,drama and otherkinds ofwritingand communication;

a range of authorsand texts from different periods of history,including thosebefore 1800;

the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and the importance of the linguistic,literary,culturaland socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

the appropriateand precise use of critical,linguisticand stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its the orization;

how literature and language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of the English language and of its regional and global varieties;

 the discipline’s relationship to other disciplines and forms of knowledge.

 

Sport Science

the effects of sport and exercise intervention, and being able to appraise and evaluate these effects on the individual;

the disciplines underpinning human structure and form;

the skills required to monitor, analyse, diagnose and prescribe action to enhance the learning and performance of sport in both laboratory and field settings;

the variables involved in the delivery (teaching, instructing, coaching) of enhanced sport performance;

 the social, economic and political theory to explain the development and differentiation of sport in society.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

English

use criticalskills in the close reading and analysis oftexts;

show sensitivity togeneric conventions and to the shaping effectson communication of circumstances,authorship,textualproductionand intended audience;

demonstrate awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature ofl anguage and literature;

show understanding of the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

appreciate of the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;

where appropriate, demonstrate the use of theories and techniques of writing in their own creative work.

 

Sport Science

the ability to identify and analyse a broad range of human and situational variables operating in sport;

the ability to consider the many factors which may have facilitative or debilitative effects upon sport performance.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

English

 

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form and be able to respond to a range of texts through creative or analytical writing;

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range oforal and written communication.

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including theabilitytoaccess,work withand evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgment through critical or creative practice;

deploy a broad range ofcriticalvocabulary and appropriate theoretical terminology;

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventionsin the presentation of work.

 

Sport Science

monitor and evaluate sports performance in laboratories and field settings;

undertake laboratory fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment;

plan and execute appropriate techniques and skills in the practice of sport activities.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

demonstrate advanced literacyand communication skills;

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex informationin a structured and systematic way;

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

show the capacity to adapt and transfer the critical methods of the discipline to a variety of working environments;

show their ability to initiate and take responsibility for their own work;

work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;

demonstrate high-level ITskills and the ability to access,work with and evaluate electronic resources;

demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

4. Programme structure

 

 

 

 Part A

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Semester One (50 Credits)

 

Semester Two (50 Credits)

PSA001  Teaching and Coaching 1 (year-long 20 credit module)

PSA011 (10)

Introduction to Pedagogy

PSA030 (10)

Introduction to Physical Activity and Health

PSA024 (10)

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

PSA026 (10)

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

EAA700 (20)

Narrative Forms and Fiction

EAA701 (20)

Literary and Critical Theories

         

 

Optional Modules In addition, students must choose 20 optional credits from the following in EITHER semester 1 OR semester 2.

Semester One

 

Semester Two

EAA102 (20)

Introduction to Language

EAA001 (20)

 Introduction to Film

EAA104 (20)

Introduction to Poetry

EAA200 (20)

How to Do Things with Digital Texts

 

Part B  

Students are required to take a minimum of 40 credits in each subject area across Part B.

Students can choose a minimum of 50 and a maximum of 70 credits each semester provided that a total of 120 credits are accumulated overall

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 credits)

Students must choose at least one module from the four modules listed below. 

Semester One (20 Credits)

Semester Two (20 Credits)

 

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature      (post-1800)                      

 EAB712 (20)

Modernisms                       (post-1800)

 

English Optional Modules

 

ENGLISH

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One

 

Semester Two

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature (if not a chosen compulsory)    

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB113 (20)

Introduction to Linguistics

EAB017 (20)

America at War

EAB035 (20)

The Weird Tale

EAB020 (20)

Diverse Voices

EAB039 (20)

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture

EAB016 (20)

Language in Society *Pre-Requisite: Introduction to Linguistics

EAB154 (20)                                        

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare  

EAB018 (20)

Women's Writing in the Seventeenth Century

     

   

 

 

 

Sport Science Optional Modules

Students must choose a minimum of 50 credits and a maximum of 70 credits each semester. Total credits for the year must total 120 credits.

Semester One

Semester Two

PSB001 (20)

Teaching and Coaching 2 (year-long, 20 credit module)

PSB010 (20)

Sport and Exercise Pedagogy (year-long, 20 credit module)

PSB024 (10)

Making sense of Modern Sport

PSB002 (10)

Structural Kinesiology

PSB031 (10)

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

PSB015 (10)

Sport, Ideologies and Values

PSB032 (10)

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health

PSB033 (10)

Principles of Exercise Psychology

 

PSB026 (10)

Group and Interpersonal Process in Competitive Sport

 

 

 

Interdisciplinary Arts Module Options - Semester 2

Students may choose to take one module from the following list in semester 2

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management
  • Creative Writing
  • Language, Literature and Culture
  • Publishing

 

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

SAB933 (20)

Material Culture

SAB929 (20)

19th Century Bodies

SAB935 (20)

Creative Dissent: Protest, Activism and Art

SAB934 (20)

Fashion Theory

SAB937 (20)

Non-Verbal Communication: Body Adornments and New Technologies

SAB938 (20)

Arts Management 

SAB939 (20)

Word and Image: Verbo-Visual Exchnage in Art and Litereature

EAB912(20)

Costume Design

EAB012 (20

African American Culture

EAB050 (20)

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

EAB114 (20)

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

EAB110 (20)

Introduction to Multimodality

EAB809 (20)

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C

There are no compulsory modules in Part C for English and Sport Science Students

Optional Modules (total modular weight 120 credits)

Students are required to take a minimum of 40 credits in each subject area, across Part C. Students can choose a minimum of 50 and a maximum of 70 credits each semester provided that 120 credits are accumulated overall.

English Optional Modules

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

Semester Two

EAC009 (40)

Dissertation (year-long, 40 credit module)

EAC314 (20)

Maps and Motors

EAC024 (20)

The Writings of Intimacy

EAC440 (20)

The Modern Poet

EAC300 (20)

Rare Shakespeare

EAC016 (20)

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on trial in American Culture

EAC001 (20)

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

EAC002 (20)

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

EAC701 (20)

Global America

 

 

EAC109 (20)

Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

 

Sport Science Optional Credits

Semester One

Semester Two

PSC017 (20)

Sport Pedagogy 3

PSC032 (20)

Physical Activity and Health of Children

PSC024 (10)

Sport, the Body and Deviance

PSC018 (20)

Teaching and Coaching 3

PSC033 (10)

Psychology in Physical Education and Youth Sport

PSC023 (10)

Sport, Celebrity and Place

PSC035 (10)

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence

PSC034 (10)

Sport Psychology in Action

 

PSC036 (10)

Applied Exercise Psychology

PSC044 (10)

Global Issues in Sport

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1  In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English and Sports Science (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons). BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English and Sports Science
Programme code EAUB09
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code QC36
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishandsportsscience/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • encourage in students a sense of enthusiasm for the study of English and foster engagement with reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;
  • encourage students to reflect critically upon acts of writing and reading in English, and on the history of textual production and reception;
  • promote understanding of verbal creativity and appreciation of the aesthetic features of literary and non-literary texts;
  • enable students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  • instil in students advanced competence in oral and written communication;
  • develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills;
  • develop students’ understanding of the human responses and adaptations to sport and exercise;
  • provide an understanding of  the historical, social, political , economic and cultural diffusion, distribution and impact of sport in a multi-disciplinary way;
  • encourage students in the pursuit of sport and exercise and its enhancement, monitoring and analysis.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The English Benchmark Statement

  • Hospitality, Leisure Sport and Tourism Benchmark Statement

  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

  • SEEC Level Descriptors

  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of

 English

the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction,poetry,drama and otherkinds ofwritingand communication;

a range of authorsand texts from different periods of history,including thosebefore 1800;

the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and the importance of the linguistic,literary,culturaland socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

the appropriateand precise use of critical,linguisticand stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its the orization;

how literature and language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of the English language and of its regional and global varieties;

 the discipline’s relationship to other disciplines and forms of knowledge.

 

Sport Science

the effects of sport and exercise intervention, and being able to appraise and evaluate these effects on the individual;

the disciplines underpinning human structure and form;

the skills required to monitor, analyse, diagnose and prescribe action to enhance the learning and performance of sport in both laboratory and field settings;

the variables involved in the delivery (teaching, instructing, coaching) of enhanced sport performance;

 the social, economic and political theory to explain the development and differentiation of sport in society.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

English

use criticalskills in the close reading and analysis oftexts;

show sensitivity togeneric conventions and to the shaping effectson communication of circumstances,authorship,textualproductionand intended audience;

demonstrate awareness of how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature ofl anguage and literature;

show understanding of the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

appreciate of the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;

where appropriate, demonstrate the use of theories and techniques of writing in their own creative work.

 

Sport Science

the ability to identify and analyse a broad range of human and situational variables operating in sport;

the ability to consider the many factors which may have facilitative or debilitative effects upon sport performance.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

English

 

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form and be able to respond to a range of texts through creative or analytical writing;

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range oforal and written communication.

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including theabilitytoaccess,work withand evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgment through critical or creative practice;

deploy a broad range ofcriticalvocabulary and appropriate theoretical terminology;

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventionsin the presentation of work.

 

Sport Science

monitor and evaluate sports performance in laboratories and field settings;

undertake laboratory fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment;

plan and execute appropriate techniques and skills in the practice of sport activities.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to…

demonstrate advanced literacyand communication skills;

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex informationin a structured and systematic way;

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

show the capacity to adapt and transfer the critical methods of the discipline to a variety of working environments;

show their ability to initiate and take responsibility for their own work;

work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;

demonstrate high-level ITskills and the ability to access,work with and evaluate electronic resources;

demonstrate effective organisational and time-management skills.

4. Programme structure

  • The following module titles are indicative of the options typically offered on the programme subject to availability and timetable permitting 
  • Students must choose 120 credits across the year, with 60 credits in each of the joint disciplines.
  • Students may select modules (with a total weighting of 20 credits) from those listed in the School Catalogue or the University’s Module Catalogue subject to approval by the School.

 Part A

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Semester One (50 Credits)

 

Semester Two (50 Credits)

PSA001  Teaching and Coaching 1 (year-long 20 credit module)

PSA011 (10)

Introduction to Pedagogy

PSA030 (10)

Introduction to Physical Activity and Health

PSA024 (10)

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

PSA026 (10)

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

EAA700 (20)

Narrative Forms and Fiction

EAA701 (20)

Literary and Critical Theories

         

 

Optional Modules In addition, students must choose 20 optional credits from the following in EITHER semester 1 OR semester 2. The following are indicative of the optional modules typically offered on the programme.

Semester One

 

Semester Two

EAA102 (20)

Introduction to Language

EAA011 (20)

Writing in History

EAA104 (20)

Introduction to Poetry

 

 

Part B  

It is advisable that, where possible, students choose not more than 60 credits per semester.

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 credits)

Students must choose at least one module from the four modules listed below. 

Semester One (20 Credits)

Semester Two (20 Credits)

 

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature      (post-1800)                      

 EAB712 (20)

Modernisms                       (post-1800)

 

English Optional Modules (total modular weight 40 credits)

Students may choose an additional 40 optional credits. The remaining 60 optional credits must be chosen from the Sport Science list.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

 

Semester Two

EAB710 (20)

Renaissance Writings (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB711 (20)

Eighteenth-Century Literature (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB008 (20)

Victorian Literature (if not a chosen compulsory)    

EAB712 (20)

Modernisms (if not a chosen compulsory)

EAB113 (20)

Introduction to Linguistics

EAB110 (20)

Introduction to Multimodality

EAB035 (20)

The Weird Tale

EAB114 (20)

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

EAB039 (20)

Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture

 EAB012 (20)

African American Culture

EAB154 (20)                                        

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare  

EAB050 (20)

Philosophy, Literature and the Arts

EAB102 (20)      

American Adaptations   

EAB060 (20)

American Nightmare

EAB040 (20)

New Woman Writing of the Fin de Siecle

EAB016 (20)

Language in Society *Pre-Requisite: Introduction to Linguistics

EAB020 (20)

Diverse Voices

EAB018 (20)

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

 

Sport Science Optional Modules (total modular weight 60 credits)

Students must choose 60 credits optional credits. Students are advised, where possible, to choose a total (including their English modules) of not more than 60 credits per semester.

Semester One

Semester Two

PSB001 (20)

Teaching and Coaching 2 (year-long, 20 credit module)

PSB010 (20)

Sport and Exercise Pedagogy (year-long, 20 credit module)

PSB024 (10)

Making sense of Modern Sport

PSB002 (10)

Structural Kinesiology

PSB031 (10)

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

PSB015 (10)

Sport, Ideologies and Values

 

PSB026 (10)

Group and Interpersonal Process in Competitive Sport

 

 

PSB033 (10)

Principles of Exercise Psychology

PSB032 (10)  Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health      

 

School-Wide Module Options

 

 

 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

 

 

 

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management

 

 

 

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester 2

SAB933 (20)

Textile Futures 

SAB935 (20)

Art, Activism and Society

SAB936 (20)

Urban Visual Culture

SAB937 (20)

Wearable words, artefacts and new technologies

SAB938 (20)

Arts Management 

EAB912(20)

Costume Design

EAB704(20)

Modern and Contemporary British Theatre

EAB808 (20)

From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 

Part C

There are no compulsory modules in Part C for English and Sport Science Students

Students are required to take a minimum of 40 credits in each subject area in part C.

Students can choose a minimum of 50 and a maximum of 70 credits each semester provided that 120 credits are accumulated overall.

Optional Modules (total modular weight 120 credits)

 

English Optional Modules

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

 

Semester One

Semester Two

EAC009 (40)

Dissertation (year-long, 40 credit module)

 

 

 

 

EAC314 (20)

Maps and Motors

EAC300 (20)

Rare Shakespeare

EAC002 (20)

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

EAC103 (20)

Modernisms

EAC440 (20)

The Modern Poet

EAC701 (20)

Global America

EAC016 (20)

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

EAC024 (20)

Writings of Intimacy

 

Sport Science Optional Credits

Semester One

Semester Two

PSC017 (20)

Sport Pedagogy 3

PSC032 (20)

Physical Activity and Health of Children

PSC024 (10)

Sport, the Body and Deviance

PSC018 (20)

Teaching and Coaching 3

PSC033 (10)

Psychology in Physical Education and Youth Sport

PSC023 (10)

Sport, Celebrity and Place

PSC035 (10)

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence

PSC034 (10)

Sport Psychology in Action

 

PSC036 (10)

Applied Exercise Psychology

PSC044 (10)

Global Issues in Sport

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.2   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) English and Sports Science (2012- 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons). BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title English and Sports Science
Programme code EAUB09
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (Part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before commencement of Part C.
UCAS code QC36
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/english-drama/englishandsportsscience/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Department seeks to encourage in its students:

  • a sense of enthusiasm for the subjects and a full understanding of their social and cultural significance
  • the study of English and Sports Science as a means of developing the ability of students to read critically and to be both sensitive and disciplined in their approach to their studies
  • educate students to think independently, to reason critically and to adopt a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of sport.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • English Benchmark Statement 
  • Hospitality, Leisure Sport and Tourism Benchmark Statement
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (FHEQ)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:           

1.     a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800;

2.     the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama, and should have an appreciation of the structure and function of the English language;

3.     the power of imagination in literary creation and have an awareness of the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study;

4.     the disciplines underpinning human structure and function;

5.     the effects of sport and exercise intervention, and being able to appraise and evaluate these effects on the individual;

6.     the skills required to monitor, analyse, diagnose and prescribe action to enhance the learning and performance of sport in both laboratory and field settings;

7.     the variables involved in the delivery (teaching, instructing, coaching) of enhanced sport performance;

8.     social, economic and political theory to explain the development and differentiation of sport in society.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will have acquired:

  1.  the ability the read and analyse texts closely and critically;
  2. a thorough understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to English Studies;
  3. an appreciation of the central role of language in the creation of meaning and will have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument;
  4. bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline and will be practised in the accurate citation of sources and in the use of conventions in the presentation of scholarly work;
  5. the ability to identify and analyse a broad range of human and situational variables operating in sport;
  6. the ability to consider the many factors which may have facilitative or debilitative effects upon sport performance.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  1.  present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form;
  2.  critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communications;
  3.  demonstrate advanced and effective research skills, including the ability to access and assess electronic data;
  4.  monitor and evaluate sports performance in laboratories and field settings;
  5.  undertake laboratory and fieldwork efficiently and with due regard to safety and risk assessment;
  6.  plan and execute appropriate techniques and skills in the practice of sport activities.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should:

  1.     possess and apply advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;
  2.     be able to communicate effectively and work with others through the presentation of ideas and the collective negotiation of solutions;
  3.     be able to understand and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions, and should be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;
  4.     possess effective organisational and time-management skills and be able to present ideas using basic computational methods.

4. Programme structure

Part A - Introductory Modules

English

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 30)

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

Optional - NONE

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 10)

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

Optional (total modular weight 20)

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

20 credits

EAA003

Introduction to the Short Story

20 credits

EAA004

Language in Context

20 credits

EAA108

The Search for Identity

20 credits

EAA010

Writing Women

20 credits

EAA011

Writing in History

20 credits

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10 credits

EAA015

Introduction to Short Narrative

10 credits

EAA016

The Essay

10 credits

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

10 credits

 

 

 

 

School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Semester 1 and 2

Compulsory (20 credits)

PSA001

Teaching and Coaching 1

20 credits

Semester 1

Compulsory

PSA011

Introduction to Pedagogies

10 credits

PSA024

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

10 credits

Semester 2

Compulsory

PSA030

Introduction to Pysical Activity and Health

10 credits

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

10 credits

 Part B - Degree Modules

Candidates may choose optional modules so that as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year.

Candidates may apply to the Head of Department for permission to undertake an approved course of study at a European University which is a member of the EU-approved Erasmus exchange programme.  Candidates can only apply to take a single semester abroad not a full academic year. The exchange option would be in place of study at Loughborough for Semester 2 only during Part B of the degree programme.

If the 60-credit study abroad programme is taken, students must complete a full 60 credits of Sports Science modules in Semester 1 allowing them to take 60 Loughborough credits in English during their time at an Erasmus exchange institution. (Sports modules are not an option at any of our exchange universities.) 

English

Semester 1

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB001

British Drama 1576-1737*

20 credits

Optional

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Writing

20 credits

EAB102

American Adaptations 

20 credits 

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB918

Revolt Against Fate: Literature and Theatre of the Absurd

20 credits

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB040

New Women’s Writing

20 credits

 

Semester 2

Compulsory (total modular weight 20)

EAB008

Victorian Literature*

20 credits

Optional

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB060

American Nightmare

20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB018

Women’s Writing in the Seventeenth Century

20 credits

EAB035

Weird Tale

20 credits

EAB101

Study Abroad

60 credits

 

 

 

 *Students must take EITHER EAB001 in Semester 1 OR EAB008 in Semester 2

English optional modules are to be chosen such that the total number of credits for the year is 60, i.e. compulsory module weighted 20 plus optional modules weighted 40.

 School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Semesters 1 & 2

Compulsory - None

Optional

PSB001

Teaching and Coaching 2

20 credits

PSB010

Sport and Exercise Pedagogy

20 credits

Semester 1

Optional

PSB024

Making  Sense of Modern Sport

10 credits

 

 

 

PSB031

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

10 credits

Semester 2

Optional

PSB026

Group and Inter Process in Competitive Sport

10 credits

 

 

 

PSB015

Sport, Ideologies and Values

10 credits

PSB032

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health

10 credits

PSB002

Structural Kinesiology

10 credits

PSB033

Principles of Exercise Psychology

10 credits

 *A one-semester version of Teaching and Coaching (PSB101) is available to students who choose the ‘Study Abroad’ option. 

SSEHS optional modules are to be chosen such that the total number of credits for the year is 60.

 Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

 Part C - Degree Modules

 

Candidates may choose optional modules so that as few as 50 or as many as 70 credit units are attempted in a semester, provided that 120 credit units are accumulated over the year. There are NO compulsory modules in Part C.

Candidates may not choose a total of more than 20 credits in the year that have a prefix of EAB.

Candidates are required to take a minimum of 140 credits in each subject area accumulated over the course of the programme.

 English

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language and Linguistics

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature and Film

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semesters 1 and 2

Optional

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

Semester 1

Optional

EAC314

Maps and Motors

20 credits

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on Trial in American Culture

20 credits

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

 Semester 2

Optional

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

20 credits

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

 

Semester 1 

Optional

PSC017

Sport Pedagogy 3

20 credits

PSC024

Sport, The Body and Deviance

10 credits

PSC033

Psychology in Physical Education in Youth Sport

10 credits

PSC035

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence

10 credits

 

 

 

Semester 2

Optional

 

 

 

PSC032

Physical Activities and Health of Children

20 credits

PSC023

Sport, Celebrity and Place

10 credits

PSC018

Teaching and Coaching 3

20 credits

PSC034

Sport Psychology in Action

10 credits

PSC036

Applied Exercise Psychology

10 credits

PSC044

Global Issues in Sport

10 credits

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

.1   In order to progress from Part A to Part B, obtain least 40% in all compulsory English modules. 

.2   In order to progress from Part B to Part C, obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any part of the Programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX.  The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Publishing and English (2015 - 2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Publishing and English
Programme code EAUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before the commencement of Part C.
UCAS code P4Q3 (3-year); P4QH (4-year)
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The programme seeks to:

  • advance students’ understanding of the professional, managerial and technical dimensions of work in the publishing industry;

  • equip students with a sufficiently advanced command of the English language to enable them to undertake editorial work professionally in any English-speaking country;

  • provide the core skills needed to obtain an entry-level professional position in the publishing industry;

  • equip students with an awareness of legal, ethical and professional issues as they relate to the publishing industry;

  • foster the ability to conduct independent research using appropriate methodologies and to present the results appropriately;

  • provide an intellectually stimulating experience of learning and studying;

  • encourage in its students a strong sense of enthusiasm for the subject and a full understanding of its social and cultural significance;

  • foster engagement with a wide and varied spectrum of reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;

  • encourage students to reflect critically upon the acts of reading and writing and on the history of textual production and reception;

  • educate its students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;

  • promote the understanding of verbal creativity and aesthetic features in literary and non-literary texts;

  • instil in its students advanced competence in oral and written communication;

develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Statement for Communication, media, film and cultural studies

(http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Subject-benchmark-statement-Communication-media-film-and-cultural-studies.pdf)

  • QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of…

 design principles and production technologies as applied to printed and electronic publications;

editorial and marketing roles as applicable to various categories of books and periodical publications;

financial, human resources and general management principles and methods as applied in the publishing industry;

the position of the publishing industry within the overall structure of the media industries world-wide;

the roles of information, information technology and information products in the 21st century.

the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres offiction,poetry,drama and other kinds of writing and communication;

a range of authors and texts from different periods of history,including those before 1800;

the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and thei mportance of the linguistic,literary,cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

the appropriate and precise use of critical,linguistic and stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its theorisation;

how literaturea nd language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of theEnglish language and of its regional and global varieties.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to.

 

critically analyse developments in the publishing industry;

evaluate different information technology applications and their use;

discuss the principles of management as applied to publishing in a variety of environments and institutional contexts;

analyse data and synthesise information into value-added formats;

evaluate publishers’ customers’ needs in a variety of contexts and in relation to a range of printed and electronic information products;

demonstrate an awareness of legal, ethical and professional issues as they relate to the publishing industry;

 use critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts;

 show sensitivity to generic conventions and the shaping effects on communication of circumstances,authorship,textual production and intended audience;

understand how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature of language and literature;

understand the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

appreciate the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

use rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to.

demonstrate IT competence with a range of computer applications;

use desktop publishing and computer graphics software;

design publications (print and electronic) that will be marketable;

undertake copy-editing tasks confidently and with accuracy;

apply legal and ethical procedures within the publishing industry;

use financial and other management techniques appropriate to the publishing industry;

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form;

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communications;

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including the ability to access,work with and evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgement through critical or creative practice;

deploy a broad range of critical vocabulary and appropriate theoretical terminology;

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventions in the presentation of work.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to.

plan and undertake independent research for a project in a defined project area;

manage a range of information and data and present them effectively in a suitable format;

communicate effectively the results of their studies and research in writing (reports and essays) and by means of oral presentation;

work effectively in teams;

utilise time management skills in planning work;

use the English language both orally and in writing to present a persuasive argument;

understand and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions;

use a variety of IT packages and applications confidently;

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

adapt and transfer the critical methods of their studies to a variety of working environments.

4. Programme structure

Part A

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Semester One (40 Credits)

 

Credit Weight

Semester Two (60 Credits)

Credit Weight

EAA700

Narrative Forms and Fiction

20 credits

EAA701

Literary and Critical Theories

20 credits

EAA809

Web Design, Graphic Design and Desktop Publishing

20 credits

EAA810

Introduction to Publishing and Bookselling

20 credits

 

 

EAA811

Communications Law and Ethics

20 credits

 Optional Modules (In addition, students must choose a 20 credit optional module in semester one.)

Semester One

Credit Weight

 

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry

20 credits

EAA102

Introduction to Language

20 credits

Part B

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Students must choose at least one module from each semester from the four modules listed below.  One of these must be a pre-1800 module and one must be a post-1800 module.

Semester One (Min. 20 Credits)

Credit weight

Semester Two (Min. 20 Credits)

 

Credit Weight

EAB710

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

20 credits

EAB008

Victorian Literature (post 1800)                       

20 credits

EAB712

Modernisms  (post-1800)     

20 credits

 Compulsory Publishing Modules (Students will also be registered for the compulsory modules below)

Semester One

Credit Weight

Semester Two

Credit Weight

EAB801

Text, Editing and Design

20 credits

EAB805

Children’s Reading

20 credits

 

 

EAB807

Communicating Knowledge

20 credits

           

Optional Modules (In addition, students must choose an additional 20 credit optional module in semester one.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Publishing Histories

  • Graphic Design and Desktop Publishing

  • Publishing Industries

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Language, Linguistics and Creative Writing

  • American Literature

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

 

Credit Weight

 

EAB039

Nineteenth Century American Literature and Culture

20 credits

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB035      

Weird Tale

20 credits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part I

Four year Sandwich Programme (DPS) route

Candidates will undertake an approved placement leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. 

Semesters 1 and 2

EAI001

Industrial Training Placement

120 credits

Part C

Compulsory Modules (Students must choose EITHER Dissertation OR Publishing Research Project. Total modular weight 60 credits)

Semester One 

Credit Weight

Semester Two

Credit Weight

EAC009

Dissertation

(year-long, 40 credit module)

EAC809

Publishing Research Project

(year-long, 40 credit module)

 

 

 

 

 

EAC801

Marketing and the Magazine Business

20 credits

 

 

Optional Modules

If students choose EAC009 then they must choose a minimum of 20 credits with the prefix module code EAC8.

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:
  • Publishing Histories

  • Publishing Industries

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

Semester One

Credit Weight

Semester Two

 

Credit Weight

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

20 credits

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC314

Maps and Motors

20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual

20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

20 credits

 

 

 

20 credits

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

EAC440

 

The Modern Poet

20 credits

EAC001

 

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

20 credits

EAC806

The Child and the Book

20 credits

 

 

 

EAC808

Publishers, Authors and Agents

       

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

1.    In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must satisfy the minimum requirements as set out in Regulation XX, and also obtain at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

2.    In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and at least 40% in all compulsory English modules. 

3.    To be eligible for the award of the Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and achieve at least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

4.   Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for eligible candidates in any part of the programme to undergo re-assessment within the University’s special assessment period, except where fewer than 60 credits have been accumulated.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B: 40%, Part C: 60% to determine the Programme Mark. 

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Publishing and English (2012 - 2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Publishing and English
Programme code EAUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before the commencement of Part C.
UCAS code P4Q3 (3-year); P4QH (4-year)
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The programme aims to:

  • advance students’ understanding of the professional, managerial and technical dimensions of work in the publishing industry;
  • equip students with a sufficiently advanced command of the English language to enable them to undertake editorial work professionally in any English-speaking country;
  • provide the core skills needed to obtain an entry-level professional position in the publishing industry;
  • equip students with an awareness of legal, ethical and professional issues as they relate to the publishing industry;
  • promote an understanding of the information needs of individuals and organisations and knowledge of the systems and technologies by which information is handled;
  • provide an environment in which students are encouraged to think, read and reason critically, creatively and independently, and to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;
  • enhance students’ ability to analyse critically different forms of discourse;
  • foster the ability to conduct independent research using appropriate methodologies and to present the results appropriately.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmark Statement for Librarianship and Information Management (2007)

http://www.qaa.ac.uk/academicinfrastructure/benchmark/statements/librarianship07.pdf

  • Loughborough University Department of Information Science, Learning and Teaching Strategy

https://internal.lboro.ac.uk/sci/ls/dept/L&T%20documents/Learning%20and%20Teaching%20Strategy%20revised%20Feb02.doc

  • QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

  • design principles and production technologies as applied to printed and electronic publications;
  • editorial and marketing roles as applicable to various categories of books and periodical publications;
  • financial, human resources and general management principles and methods as applied in the publishing industry;
  • the concepts and principles underlying the storage, retrieval and use of information held in both printed and electronic forms;
  • the position of the publishing industry within the overall structure of the media industries world-wide;
  • the structure and functions of the English language;
  • the distinctive characteristics of different literary genres;
  • a range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study;
  • the roles of information, information technology and information products in the 21st century.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:
  • critically analyse developments in the publishing industry;
  • evaluate different information technology applications and their use;
  • discuss the principles of management as applied to publishing in a variety of environments and institutional contexts;
  • analyse data and synthesise information into value-added formats;
  • evaluate publishers’ customers’ needs in a variety of contexts and in relation to a range of printed and electronic information products;
  • plan metadata and other retrieval tools to be assigned to publications;
  • apply critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:
  • demonstrate IT competence with a range of computer applications;
  • use desktop publishing and computer graphics software;
  • design publications (print and electronic) that will be marketable;
  • undertake copyediting tasks confidently and with accuracy;
  • apply legal and ethical procedures within the publishing industry;
  • use financial and other management techniques appropriate to the publishing industry;
  • present cogent and persuasive arguments both in oral and written form;
  • critically assess the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communications.
c. Key transferable skills:
  • plan and undertake independent research for a project in a defined project area;
  • manage a range of information and data and present them effectively in a suitable format;
  • communicate effectively the results of their studies and research in writing (reports and essays) and by means of oral presentation;
  • work effectively in teams;
  • utilise time management skills in planning work;
  • use the English language both orally and in writing to present a persuasive argument;
  • understand and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions;
  • use a variety of IT packages and applications confidently.

4. Programme structure

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

Semester 1

COMPULSORY MODULES (weight 60)

 Code

Title

Credit Value

EAA101

Critical Studies 1

10 credits

EAA102

An Introduction to Language

10 credits

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry 1

10 credits

EAA801

Communicating  Knowledge

10 credits

EAA806

Web Design

10 credits

 EAA807

 History of Publishing

 10 credits

 OPTIONAL MODULES - NONE 

 Semester 2

COMPULSORY MODULES (weight 40)

 Code

Title

Credit Value

EAA201

Critical Studies 2

10 credits

EAA804

Publishing Law

10 credits

EAA805

Graphic Design and Desktop Publishing

10 credits

 EAA808

 Contemporary Publishing and Bookselling

10 credits 

OPTIONAL MODULES (weight 20) 

 Code

Title

Credit Value

EAA204

Introduction to Poetry 2

10

EAA015

Introduction to the Short Narrative

10

EAA016

The Essay      

10

EAA002

Women’s Voices

10

 4.2 Part B 

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits in total over the year)

*Students have to take either EAB001 or EAB008 in Part B as a compulsory module. They can though choose to take both modules – one as compulsory, one as an option.

 Semester 1 (40 or 60 credits)

 Code

Title

Credit Value

EAB001

British Drama 1576-1737 [OR EAB008*]

20 credits

EAB801

Text and Editing

20 credits

EAB804

 Marketing in the Publishing Industry

20 credits 

OPTIONAL MODULES (0 or 20 credits)

 Code

Title

Credit Value

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB113

 Introduction to Linguistics

20 credits 

EAB039

 Nineteenth-Century American Writing

20 credits 

EAB102

 American Adaptations

20 credits 

EAB020

Diverse Voices

20 credits

EAB154

Chivalry from Chaucer to Shakespeare

20 credits

EAB040

New Women’s Writing

20 credis

Semester 2

COMPULSORY MODULES (weight 20 or40)

 Code

Title

Credit Value

EAB008

Victorian Literature [OR EAB001*]

20 credits

EAB805

Children's Reading

20 credits

OPTIONAL MODULES (weight 20 or 40) 

  Code

Title

Credit Value

EAB012

African American Culture

20 credits

EAB060

American Nightmare

 20 credits

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

20 credits

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

20 credits

EAB016

Language in Society (pre-requisite EAB113)

20 credits

EAB018 

Women's Writing in the 17th Century 

20 credits 

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature

20 credits

EAB035

Weird Tale

20 credits

 4.3       Part C 

Semester 1

COMPULSORY MODULE operating across both semesters(weight 40 credits) split 20 credits across each semester.

The modular weight for both EAC809 and EAC009 is split between semesters in the ratio 20:20.  If EAC009 is taken, candidates will be required to take a minimum of 40 credits with the prefix EAC8 during Part C.

 Code

Title

Credit Value

EAC809

Project

40 credits

or

EAC009

Dissertation

40 credits

 

OPTIONAL MODULES (40 credits) 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • Publishing Histories

  • Publishing Industries

  • Literature from 1350 to the present

  • Creative Writing

  • American Literature

 

In the 2017-2018 academic year the available modules will be:

   Code        

Title

Credit Value

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1689 - 1714

20 credits

EAC314

Maps and Motors

20 credits

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual

20 credits 

EAC440

The Modern Poet

20 credits

EAC806

The Child and the Book

20 credits

EAC808

Publishers Authors and Agents

20 credits

Semester 2

 OPTIONAL MODULES (40 credits) 

  Code   

Title

Credit Value

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in the 1890s

20 credits

EAC024

Writings of Intimacy

20 credits

EAC300

Rare Shakespeare

20 credits

EAC109

Romantic Writings 1815 - 1832

20 credits

EAC701

Global America

20 credits

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1.1    In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must satisfy the minimum requirements as set out in Regulation XX, and also obtainat least 40% in all compulsory English modules.

5.1.2    In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and at least 40% in all compulsory English modules. 

5.1.3    To be eligible for the award of the Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX and achieve a minimum of 40% in all compulsory English modules.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for eligible candidates in any part of the programme to undergo re-assessment within the University’s special assessment period, except where fewer than 60 credits have been accumulated.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B: 40%, Part C: 60% to determine the Programme Mark. 

Programme Specification

SA BA (Hons) Fine Art (2014 entry part-time version)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons)+ Diploma in International Studies / BA (Hons) + Diploma in Professional Studies
Programme title Fine Art
Programme code ACUB16
Length of programme Students may complete the programme on a part-time basis over not more than eight years.
UCAS code W100, W101
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/arts/fineart/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide a supportive and intellectually stimulating environment through which to facilitate students’ acquisition of advanced practical and critical skills in contemporary fine art practice.

  • To embed the development of core practical skills – ranging across traditional and new media, 2D and 3D forms, analogue and digital processes – within an innovative and conceptually challenging curriculum.

  • To deliver a broad understanding of art making, encouraging cross-disciplinary practice, innovation and experimentation in the student learning experience.

  • To facilitate an understanding of diverse contexts for art production and consumption (within the studio and beyond) and foster a critical engagement with art’s historical, theoretical, cultural, political, social and ethical dimensions.

  • To enable the development of independent, professional and adaptable working practices pertinent to a global art context.

  • To prepare students for the manifold employment opportunities available in the creative industries, heritage sector and other cognate fields.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Art and Design
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • The QAA Policy Statement on a structured and supported process for personal development
  • Credit level descriptors for Higher Education, Sourthern England Consortium for Credit Accumulation and Transfer.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Initiate, develop and evaluate ideas, realizing them through outcomes, to generate a distinctive, professional and individual art practice.

  • Use research methods related to art practice: locate and evaluate visual and textual sources, organise and develop ideas towards speculative enquiry, visualisation and/or making.

  • Understand and engage with current debates in fine art through a rigorous exploration of contemporary art’s histories, theories and its wider social and political contexts.

  • Integrate professional skills and enterprise within their art practice and demonstrate an adaptable approach to working in the cultural industries and cognate fields.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Understand how the choice of media can affect the material and conceptual development of practical work.

  • Articulate and synthesise ideas and information comprehensively in visual oral and written forms and present ideas and work to audiences in a range of situations.

  • Research art’s histories and evaluate contemporary theories, concepts and discourses in the arts.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a high level of technical skill and knowledge in traditional and contemporary processes that are relevant to the creative sector and industries.

  • Use, effectively, a range of materials and processes such as drawing, moving image, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, sound and performance, recognizing and responding to professional opportunities and contexts where appropriate.

  • Develop a body of ambitious studio work through experimentation, technical innovation and evidence of thinking through making in the creative translation of ideas into practice.

  • Engage with themes and issues relating to local and global contemporary visual culture, cognizant of the political and ethical implications therein.

  • Demonstrate high-level skills in both visual and textual analysis and present research through such forms as essays, presentations, studio notebooks, blogs, dissertations and artist statements.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding and knowledge of traditional and new/emerging technologies, their uses and applications.

  • Solve problems individually or as part of a team through collaboration and collegial cooperation.

  • Manage complex long term projects professionally and work to deadlines.

  • Demonstrate the ability to reflect upon and articulate their skills in a range of different creative, intellectual and practical contexts.

  • Manifest an understanding of ethical issues and an appreciation of cultural diversity.

4. Programme structure

 

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

  

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAA123

Introduction to Fine Art

40

1

Compulsory

SAA921

Drawing: Discourses and Debates

20

1

Compulsory

SAA124

Developing Fine Art Practice

40

2

Compulsory

SAA922

Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Art and Design

20

2

Compulsory

 

4.2          Part B - Degree Modules

 

Code

Title

Module
Weight

Sem

status

SAB114

Locating Fine Art Practice

40

1

Compulsory

SAB115

Reflective Fine Art Practice

40

2

Compulsory

SAB931

Contemporary Art and Aesthetics

20

1

Compulsory

 

Students must choose a 20 credit module from the indicative School-wide options.

 

Optional modules will be available in the following subject areas:

  • History of Art, Architecture and Design

  • Visual Culture

  • Arts Management

  • English, Drama, Publishing and Creative Writing

In the 2016-2017 academic year the available modules will be:

Code

Title

Module
Weight

Sem

status

SAB933

Textiles Futures

20

2

Option

SAB935

Art, Activism and Society

20

2

Option

SAB936

Urban Visual Culture

20

2

Option

SAB937 Wearable Words, Artefacts and New Technologies 20 2 Option
SAB938 Arts Management 20 2 Option
EAB012 African American Culture 20 2 Option
EAB018 Women's Writing in the Seventeeth Century 20 2 Option
EAB050 Philosophy, Literature and the Arts 20 2 Option
EAB110 Introduction to Multimodality 20 2 Option
EAB114 Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing 20 2 Option
EAB704 Modern and Contemporary British Theatre 20 2 Option
EAB809 From Print to Digital: Publishing Revolutions 20 2 Option
EAB912 Costume Design 20 2 Option

 

4.3       Part I – Year Out (Four year Programme only)

 Code

 Title

 Module Weight

 Sem

 status

 SAI001

 Industrial Training Placement

 120

 1 & 2

 Optional

 SAI002

 International University
Placement

 120

 1 & 2

 Optional

 Students choose one of the above options

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

 Students choose either Route A or Route B in Semester one

 

Route A

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC116

Resolving Fine Art Practice

20

1

Compulsory

SAC940

Art and Design Dissertation

40

1

Option

SAC941

Enterprise Project Report (available for the four year version only, who have completed module SAI001 work placement)

40

1

Option


Students choose either SAC940 or SAC941

 

Route B

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC118

Consolidating Fine Art Practice

40

1

Compulsory

SAC119

Fine Arts Research Report

20

1

Compulsory

Semester Two

Code

Title

Module Weight

Sem

status

SAC117

Fine Art Practice: Final Project

60

2

Compulsory

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

  • In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits and successfully completed and passed the 10% assessment component in Academic Guidance and Professional Development in the module SAA921 and SAA922
  • In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in Part B.
  • In order to qualify for the award of a Degree, candidates must have accumulated 120 credits in Part C. 

Successful completion of Part I leads to the additional qualification of Diploma in International Studies or Diploma in Professional Studies.

Part-time students may negotiate the order in which modules are completed, subject to the following restrictions: 

  • All part A modules must be passed before the start of part B of the programme.
  • All part B modules must be passed before the start of part C of the programme. 

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment.

Reassessment will not be allowed in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) if:

  • candidates have accumulated fewer than 60 credits in any part of the programme
  • candidates have gained a mark of less than 30 in SAC117

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 20 and Part C 80 to determine the final percentage mark.

 

 

Programme Specification

EA BA (Hons) Publishing and English (2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of the Arts, English and Drama
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons) / BA (Hons) + DPS
Programme title Publishing and English
Programme code EAUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is 6 or 8 semesters. Candidates following the four year programme are required to spend an approved placement in professional industry leading to the award of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS). The sandwich year (part I) must be taken after satisfactory completion of Part B and before the commencement of Part C.
UCAS code P4Q3 (3-year); P4QH (4-year)
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The programme seeks to:

  • advance students’ understanding of the professional, managerial and technical dimensions of work in the publishing industry;

  • equip students with a sufficiently advanced command of the English language to enable them to undertake editorial work professionally in any English-speaking country;

  • provide the core skills needed to obtain an entry-level professional position in the publishing industry;

  • equip students with an awareness of legal, ethical and professional issues as they relate to the publishing industry;

  • foster the ability to conduct independent research using appropriate methodologies and to present the results appropriately;

  • provide an intellectually stimulating experience of learning and studying;

  • encourage in its students a strong sense of enthusiasm for the subject and a full understanding of its social and cultural significance;

  • foster engagement with a wide and varied spectrum of reading, writing and visual sources, through a broad and diverse curriculum;

  • encourage students to reflect critically upon the acts of reading and writing and on the history of textual production and reception;

  • educate its students to think independently, reason critically, analyse different forms of discourse, and to weigh the importance of alternative arguments and perspectives;

  • promote the understanding of verbal creativity and aesthetic features in literary and non-literary texts;

  • instil in its students advanced competence in oral and written communication;

develop a range of subject specific and generic skills of value in graduate employment, including highly developed critical, analytical and research skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Statement for Communication, media, film and cultural studies

(http://www.qaa.ac.uk/en/Publications/Documents/Subject-benchmark-statement-Communication-media-film-and-cultural-studies.pdf)

  • QAA Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of…

 design principles and production technologies as applied to printed and electronic publications;

editorial and marketing roles as applicable to various categories of books and periodical publications;

financial, human resources and general management principles and methods as applied in the publishing industry;

the position of the publishing industry within the overall structure of the media industries world-wide;

the roles of information, information technology and information products in the 21st century.

the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres offiction,poetry,drama and other kinds of writing and communication;

a range of authors and texts from different periods of history,including those before 1800;

the relationship between literature and other forms of cultural production;

the role of critical traditions in shaping literary history,and thei mportance of the linguistic,literary,cultural and socio-historical contexts in which literature is written and read;

the appropriate and precise use of critical,linguistic and stylistic terminology;

the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study which may include creative practice and its theorisation;

how literaturea nd language produce and reflect cultural change;

the structure and functions of theEnglish language and of its regional and global varieties.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to.

 

critically analyse developments in the publishing industry;

evaluate different information technology applications and their use;

discuss the principles of management as applied to publishing in a variety of environments and institutional contexts;

analyse data and synthesise information into value-added formats;

evaluate publishers’ customers’ needs in a variety of contexts and in relation to a range of printed and electronic information products;

demonstrate an awareness of legal, ethical and professional issues as they relate to the publishing industry;

 use critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts;

 show sensitivity to generic conventions and the shaping effects on communication of circumstances,authorship,textual production and intended audience;

understand how different social and cultural contexts affect judgments about the nature of language and literature;

understand the critical and theoretical models that apply to their studies;

appreciate the central role of language in the creation of meaning;

use rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to.

demonstrate IT competence with a range of computer applications;

use desktop publishing and computer graphics software;

design publications (print and electronic) that will be marketable;

undertake copy-editing tasks confidently and with accuracy;

apply legal and ethical procedures within the publishing industry;

use financial and other management techniques appropriate to the publishing industry;

present cogent and persuasive arguments both in written and oral form;

critically evaluate the effectiveness and value of a wide range of oral and written communications;

demonstrate advanced and effective research skills,including the ability to access,work with and evaluate digital sources;

demonstrate the capacity for independent thought and judgement through critical or creative practice;

deploy a broad range of critical vocabulary and appropriate theoretical terminology;

demonstrate bibliographic skills appropriate to the discipline,and expertise in accurately citing sources and using scholarly conventions in the presentation of work.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to.

plan and undertake independent research for a project in a defined project area;

manage a range of information and data and present them effectively in a suitable format;

communicate effectively the results of their studies and research in writing (reports and essays) and by means of oral presentation;

work effectively in teams;

utilise time management skills in planning work;

use the English language both orally and in writing to present a persuasive argument;

understand and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions;

use a variety of IT packages and applications confidently;

demonstrate advanced analytical skills and be able to handle complex information in a structured and systematic way;

understand and be able to interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and interpretive positions and be able to weigh the importance of alternative perspectives;

adapt and transfer the critical methods of their studies to a variety of working environments.

4. Programme structure

Part A

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Semester One (40 Credits)

 

Credit Weight

Semester Two (60 Credits)

Credit Weight

EAA700

Narrative Forms and Fiction

20 credits

EAA701

Literary and Critical Theories

20 credits

EAA809

Web Design, Graphic Design and Desktop Publishing

20 credits

EAA810

Introduction to Publishing and Bookselling

20 credits

 

 

EAA811

Communications Law and Ethics

20 credits

 Optional Modules (In addition, students must choose a 20 credit optional module in semester one.)

Semester One

Credit Weight

 

EAA104

Introduction to Poetry

20 credits

EAA102

Introduction to Language

20 credits

Part B

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 credits)

Students must choose at least one module from each semester from the four modules listed below.  One of these must be a pre-1800 module and one must be a post-1800 module.

Semester One (Min. 20 Credits)

Credit weight

Semester Two (Min. 20 Credits)

 

Credit Weight

EAB710

Renaissance Writings (pre-1800)

20 credits

EAB711

Eighteenth-Century Literature  (pre-1800)

20 credits

EAB008

Victorian Literature (post 1800)           &