Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
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Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

GY BSc (Hons) Geography and Management

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Geography and Management
Programme code GYUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters (three years) or eight semesters (four years), which includes either industrial or professional training or study abroad or overseas placement in Part I.
UCAS code FN8F FN82
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/fn8f

BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/fn82

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • provide students with an intellectually-stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in both geography and management;
  • to provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in both geography and in management;
  • to achieve, through the student learning process, a progressive improvement in the students’ academic performance over the degree programme;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Geography and General Business and Management

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of data;
  • the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader framework of  the sciences and humanities;

and within the Geography portion of the programme:

  • a range of environments, in the broadest sense, of environmental processes and the impacts of these processes on human activities and vice versa;
  • the ways in which representations and interpretations of the world are socially-constructed., and the forms of geographical difference;
  • the determinants of temporal and spatial variation in the physical, social, economic and political worlds;  and the significance of spatial and temporal scale on physical processes, human processes and on their interactions;
  • past patterns of environmental and social changes, and of the processes and conditions that have determined those changes, and the implications for the future;

and within the Management portion of the programme:

  • organisations; their internal structures and their management, including the management of human resources, financial resources and information systems;
  • the external environment within which organisations operate; the markets for goods, services and finance; customers and the implications for marketing;
  • analytical frameworks, techniques and processes; for the determination of appropriate courses of action in the context of business and the management of organisations;
  • business policy and strategy; development of policy and strategy; language of policy and strategy; current issues in strategic management.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Develop a reflexive approach to learning.
  2. Abstract and synthesise information.
  3. Assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments.
  4. Critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text.
  5. Undertake problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Develop a reasoned argument.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

1. Combine and interpret different types of evidence.
2. Recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries.
3. Employ a range of survey skills for the collection of qualitative and quantitative data and to use appropriate methods for the analysis of these data.
4. Design and execute a piece of research and produce a report.

Additionally, within the Geography portion of the programme:

5. Prepare effective maps and diagrams using a range of appropriate technologies.

6. Undertake safe and effective field and laboratory work

Additionally, within the Management portion of the programme:

7. Apply quantitative skills including data analysis and interpretation; the use of business models.

8. Evaluate a variety of business scenarios.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should show competence in:

  1. Verbal and written communication skills.
  2. Numeracy and computational skills.
  3. Field and laboratory skills.
  4. Spatial awareness and observational skills.
  5. IT and information handling and retrieval.
  6. Independent study and group work.
  7. Time management.

4. Programme structure

 

Modules with a total modular weight of 60 must be studied in each academic year (Parts A, B and C) from both Geography and Management.

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.

Due to timetabling constraints, not all option combinations may be available.

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                          (total modular weight 10)

 

Geography

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYA106

Academic and Professional Skills for Geography

10

 

Semester 1

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 60) 

 

Geography

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

GYA006

Practising Geography – Residential Fieldcourse

10

GYA101

Earth System Science

10

 

 

Management

BSA505

Organisational Behaviour

10

BSA525

Introduction to Accounting

10

 

PLUS ONE OF THE FOLLOWING:

BSA080

Quantitative Methods for Business A (for students with a post GCSE Maths qualification)

10

BSA085

Quantitative Methods for Business B (for students without a post GCSE Maths qualification)

10


Semester 2


(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 50)

Geography

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

GYA110

Environmental Hazards: from mitigation to management

10

 

Management

BSA115

Business Modelling B

10

BSA506

Management of Human Resources

10

BSA526

Accounting for Managers

10

 

4.2      Part B - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2, of which a minimum of 40 must be from Group 1 (20 if GYB327 is selected).  Fieldcourse modules GYB328 and GYB901 in Group 2 are mutually exclusive.  In addition, candidates must choose either BSB550 or BSB590 in semester 2. 

 

Geography – Group 1

GYB201

Remote Sensing and GIS

20

GYB210

Globalization

20

GYB220

Geographies of Social Difference

20

GYB230

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

20

GYB240

Environmental Systems and Resource Management

20

 

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB327

Geographical Research: Design and Practice (pre-requisite for the dissertation)

20

                    

Semester 1

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 30)

Management

BSB555

Organisation Studies

10

BSB560

Principles of Marketing

10

BSB572

Management Science Methods

10

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB110

Sustainable Urban Geographies

10

GYB311

River Ecology

10

GYB328

Physical Geography Fieldcourse

20

GYB901

Human Geography Fieldcourse

20

 

Semester 2

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 20)

Management

BSB562

The Marketing Mix

10

BSB580

Operations Management

10

 (ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Management (either BSB550 or BSB590)

BSB550

Company Finance

10

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

10

 

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB113

Geographies of Culture, Media and Representation

10

GYB308

Forest Ecology

10

GYB320

Global Migration

10

GYB400

Exploring the Ice Ages

10

 

4.3       Part I - Degree Modules

Four year programme – Candidates registered on the four-year programme will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.  

 

CODE

TITLE

GYI003

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

GYI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2.  GYC400 and GYC401 (instances 1 & 2) are mutually exclusive, as are fieldcourse modules.  In addition to BSC570, candidates must also choose a modular weight of 40 from Management modules over semesters 1 and 2.

 

Geography

 GYC400

Geography Dissertation (30 credits)

30

The modular weight of GYC400 may be split between semesters in the ratio of either 20:10 or 10:20 depending on the balance of other modular weights selected.

Semester 1

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                          (total modular weight 20)

 

Management

BSC570

Strategic Management

20

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography

GYC104

Glacial Environments and Landscapes

10

GYC207

Aeolian Processes and Landforms

10

GYC211

Snow, Ice and Society

10

GYC213

Global and World Cities

10

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

10

GYC308

Global Cities Fieldcourse

20

GYC309

Geographies of Home

10

GYC315

Environmental Change and Ecological Response

10

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 1)

20

GYC905

Livelihoods in the Global South Fieldcourse

20

GYC909

Dryland Environments Fieldcourse

20

 

 

Management

BSC015

Financial Management and Corporate Policy

10

BSC110

Marketing Strategy and Planning

10

BSC105

International Human Resource Management

10

BSC520

Business Systems

10

BSC522

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

10

                                 

Semester 2

(i)            OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography

GYC107

Regional Worlds

20

GYC108

Climate and Society

20

GYC110

GIS, Modelling and Flood Risk Management

10

GYC200

Conservation: Principles and Practice

10

GYC300

River Dynamics and the Environment

10

GYC214

Geographies of Children and Youth

10

GYC325

Geographies of Transnational Mobility and Diaspora

20

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 2)

20

 

 

Management

BSC042

Corporate and Wholesale Banking

10

BSC085

Changing Work Organisation 

10

BSC124

Marketing Communications

10

BSC144

Project Management

10

BSC524

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning

10

BSC575

Leadership & Interpersonal Skills

10

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

GY BSc (Hons) Geography and Sport Management

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Geography and Sport Management
Programme code GYUB04
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters (three years), or eight semesters (four years) for students who take the opportunity to undertake professional training via an approved industrial/work placement or an academic year abroad (Part I).
UCAS code LN78 / LN7F
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln78

BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln7f

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln78
Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually-stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in both geography and sport management;
  • to provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in both human and physical geography and in the field of sport management;
  • to develop appropriate professional practice;
  • to achieve, through the student learning process, a progressive improvement in academic performance over the degree programme;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Geography, Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism, General Business & Management.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of data;
  • the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader framework of the sciences and humanities;

and within the Geography portion of the programme:

  • a range of environments, in the broadest sense, of processes and the impacts of these processes on human activities and vice versa;
  • the ways in which representations and interpretations of the world are socially-constructed., and the forms of geographical difference;
  • the determinants of temporal and spatial variation in the physical, social, economic and political worlds; and the significance of spatial and temporal scale on physical processes, human processes and on their interactions;
  • past patterns of environmental and social changes, and of the processes and conditions that have determined those changes, and the implications for the future;

and within the Sport Management portion of the programme:

  • the issues of lifestyle, consumption and culture relating to sport, and to critically evaluate and reflect on the ways in which people’s lives are affected;
  • the organisations and structures responsible for sport, and display a critical insight into the political ramifications which arise from these;
  • the concepts of social, public and business policy in the planning and delivery of sport;
  • the theories, concepts and principles of practice from management-based study of human resources, economics, finance and marketing, and their applications to sport events and facility provision.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Develop a reflexive approach to learning.
  2. Abstract and synthesise information.
  3. Assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments.
  4. Critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text.
  5. Undertake problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Develop a reasoned argument.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

1. Combine and interpret different types of evidence.

2. Recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries.

3. Undertake safe and effective field and laboratory work.

4. Employ a range of survey skills for the collection of qualitative and quantitative data and to use appropriate methods for the analysis of these data.

5. Design and execute a piece of research and produce a report.

Additionally, within the Geography portion of the programme:

6. Prepare effective maps and diagrams using a range of appropriate technologies.

Additionally, within the Sport Management portion of the programme:

7.Demonstrate a range of skills necessary to deliver and reflect upon a sport experience, a competition or an event, for example, in the promotion of professional practice.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should show competence in:

  1. Verbal and written communication skills.
  2. Numeracy and computational skills.
  3. Field and laboratory skills.
  4. Spatial awareness and observational skills.
  5. IT and information handling and retrieval.
  6. Independent study and group work.
  7. Time management.

4. Programme structure

Modules with a total modular weight of 60 must be studied in each academic year (Parts A, B and C) from both Geography and Sport Management.  

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20, this shall be split equally between semesters.

Due to timetabling constraints, not all optional combinations may be available.

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                          (total modular weight 10)

 

Geography

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYA106

Tutorials

10

 

Semester 1

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 60)

 

Geography

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

GYA006

Practising Geography – Residential Fieldcourse

10

GYA101

Earth System Science

10

 

 

 

Sport Management

PSA003

Professional Skills

10

PSA044

The Sport Industries

20

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Candidates must choose a modular weight of 20 from Sport Management modules over semesters 1 and 2.

 

Sport Management

BSA512

The Leisure Market

10

PSA024

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

10

 

Semester 2

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 30)

 

Geography

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

GYA110

Environmental Hazards: from mitigation to management

10

 

 

 

Sport Management

BSA530

Behaviour in Sports Organisations

10

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Sport Management

BSA510

Economics Environment of Leisure Management

10

PSA040

Sports Enterprise

10

PSA041

Olympic Studies

20

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2 

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2, of which a minimum of 40 must be from Group 1 (20 if GYB327 is selected).  Fieldcourse modules GYB328 and GYB901 in Group 2 are mutually exclusive.  In addition, candidates must choose a modular weight of 40 from Sport Management modules over semesters 1 and 2.

Geography – Group 1

GYB201

Remote Sensing and GIS

20

GYB210

Globalization

20

GYB220

Geographies of Social Difference

20

GYB230

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

20

GYB240

Environmental Systems and Resource Management

20

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB327

Geographical Research: Design and Practice (pre-requisite for the dissertation)

20

 

Semester 1

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                        (total modular weight 10) 

 

Sport Management

BSB520

Principles of Marketing for Sport

10

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB110

Sustainable Urban Geographies

10

GYB311

River Ecology

10

GYB328

Physical Geography Fieldcourse

20

GYB901

Human Geography Fieldcourse

20

 

 

 

Sport Management

BSB510

Human Resource Management in Sports Organisations

10

BSB530

Accounting for Business

10

PSB024

Making Sense of Modern Sport

10

PSB051

Foundations of Sports Law

10

 

Semester 2

 

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                        (total modular weight 10)

 

Sport Management

BSB522

The Marketing Mix for Sport and Leisure

10

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB113

Geographies of Culture, Media and Representation

10

GYB308

Forest Ecology

10

GYB320

Global Migration

10

GYB400

Exploring the Ice Ages

10

 

 

Sport Management

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

10

PSB015

Sport, Ideologies and Values

10

PSB044

Sport Inclusion and Diversity

10

PSB052

Managing Sports Organisations

10

 

 

4.3       Part I

Four year programme – Candidates registered on the four-year programme will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI. 

 

CODE

TITLE

GYI003

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

GYI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

  

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2.  GYC400 and GYC401 (instances 1 & 2) are mutually exclusive, as are fieldcourse modules.  Candidates must also choose a combined modular weight of 40 from Sport Management modules over semesters 1 and 2.

Semester 1 & 2

 

Geography

 GYC400

Geography Dissertation (30 credits)

30

 

The modular weight of GYC400 may be split between semesters in the ratio of either 20:10 or 10:20 depending on the balance of other modular weights selected.

Semester 1

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                          (total modular weight 20)   

 

Sport Management

BSC049

Sport Policy Analysis

20

                         

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography

GYC104

Glacial Environments and Landscapes

10

GYC207

Aeolian Processes and Landforms

10

GYC211

Snow, Ice and Society

10

GYC213

Global and World Cities

10

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

10

GYC308

Global Cities Fieldcourse

20

GYC309

Geographies of Home

10

GYC315

Environmental Change and Ecological Response

10

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 1)

20

GYC905

Livelihoods in the Global South Fieldcourse

20

GYC909

Dryland Environments Fieldcourse

20

 

 

Sport Management

BSC522

Entrepreneurship and Innovation

10

BSC565

Fundamentals of Strategic Management

10

PSC024

Sport, the Body and Deviance

10

PSC045

Advanced Sport Marketing

10

 

Semester 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography

GYC107

Regional Worlds

20

GYC108

Climate and Society

20

GYC110

GIS, Modelling and Flood Risk Management

10

GYC200

Conservation: Principles and Practice

10

GYC300

River Dynamics and the Environment

10

GYC214

Geographies of Children and Youth

10

GYC325

Geographies of Transnational Mobility and Diaspora

20

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 2)

20

 

 

Sport Management

BSC124

Marketing Communications

10

BSC524

Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning

10

PSC023

Sport, Celebrity and Place

10

PSC032

Physical Activity and Health of Children

20

PSC044

Global Issues in Sport

20

PSC046

Sports Economics

20

PSC047

Sports Governance

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

GY BSc (Hons) Geography and Sport Science (Entry prior to 2019)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Geography and Sport Science
Programme code GYUB05
Length of programme The duration of the programme is normally six semesters (three years), or eight semesters (four years) for students who take the opportunity to undertake professional training via an approved industrial/work placement or undertake an academic year abroad (Part I).
UCAS code FC86 / FC8F
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/fc86

BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/fc8f

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually-stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in both geography and the core sport sciences;
  • to provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in both human and physical geography and in the fields of sport and exercise science and physical education;
  • to develop appropriate professional practice;
  • to achieve, through the student learning process, a progressive improvement in academic performance over the degree programme;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Geography and Sport Science (within Unit 25 Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of data;
  • the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader frameworks of the sciences and humanities;

and within the Geography portion of the programme:

  • a range of environments, in the broadest sense, of environmental processes and the impacts of these processes on human activities and vice versa;
  • the ways in which representations and interpretations of the world are socially-constructed, and the forms of geographical difference;
  • the determinants of temporal and spatial variation in the physical, social, economic and political worlds; and the significance of spatial and temporal scale on physical processes, human processes and on their interactions;
  • past patterns of environmental and social changes, and of the processes and conditions that have determined those changes, and the implications for the future;

and within the Sport Science portion of the programme:

  • the disciplines underpinning human structure and function;
  • the effects of sport and exercise intervention, and being able to appraise and evaluate these effects on the individual;
  • the skills required to monitor, analyse, diagnose and prescribe action to enhance the learning and performance of sport in both laboratory and field settings;
  • the variables involved in the delivery (teaching, instructing, coaching) of enhanced sport performance;
  • social, economic and political theory to explain the development and differentiation of sport in society.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Develop a reflexive approach to learning.
  2. Abstract and synthesise information.
  3. Assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments.
  4. Critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text.
  5. Undertake problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Develop a reasoned argument.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

1. Combine and interpret different types of evidence.
2. Recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries.
3. Undertake safe and effective field and laboratory work.
4. Employ a range of survey skills for the collection of qualitative and quantitative data and to use appropriate methods for the analysis of these data.
5. Design and execute a piece of research and produce a report.

Additionally, within the Geography portion of the programme: 

6. Prepare effective maps and diagrams using a range of appropriate technologies.

Additionally, within the Sport Science portion of the programme:

7.Plan and execute appropriate techniques and skills in the practice of sport activities.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should show competence in:

  1. Verbal and written communication skills.
  2. Numeracy and computational skills.
  3. Field and laboratory skills.
  4. Spatial awareness and observational skills.
  5. IT and information handling and retrieval.
  6. Independent study and group work.
  7. Time management.

4. Programme structure

Modules with a total modular weight of 60 must be studied in each academic year (Parts A, B and C) from both Geography and Sport Science. 

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20, this shall be split equally between semesters.

Due to timetabling constraints, not all option combinations may be available.

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                     (total modular weight 30)

 

Geography

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYA106

Tutorials

10

 

 

Sport Science

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

PSA001

Teaching and Coaching 1

20

 

Semester 1

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                   (total modular weight 50)

Geography

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

GYA006

Practising Geography – Residential Fieldcourse

10

GYA101

Earth System Science

10

 

Sport Science

PSA011

Introduction to Pedagogy

10

PSA024

Introduction to Sociology of Sport

10

  

Semester 2 

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                     (total modular weight 40)

Geography

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

GYA110

Environmental Hazards: from mitigation to management

10

 

Sport Science

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

10

PSA030

Introduction to Physical Activity and Health

10

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2, of which a minimum of 40 must be from Group 1 (20 if GYB327 is selected).  Fieldcourse modules GYB328 and GYB901 in Group 2 are mutually exclusive.  In addition, candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Sport Science modules over semesters 1 and 2.

Geography – Group 1

GYB201

Remote Sensing and GIS

20

GYB210

Globalization

20

GYB220

Geographies of Social Difference

20

GYB230

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

20

GYB240

Environmental Systems and Resource Management

20

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB327

Geographical Research: Design and Practice (pre-requisite for the dissertation)

20

 

Sport Science

PSB001

Teaching and Coaching 2

20

PSB010

Sport Pedagogy 2

20

 

Semester 1

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Geography – Group 2

GYB110

Sustainable Urban Geographies

10

GYB311

River Ecology

10

GYB328

Physical Geography Fieldcourse

20

GYB901

Human Geography Fieldcourse

20

  

Sport Science

PSB024

Making Sense of Modern Sport

10

PYB208

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

10

PSB032

Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour and Health

10

  

Semester 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB113

Geographies of Culture, Media and Representation

10

GYB308

Forest Ecology

10

GYB320

Global Migration

10

GYB400

Exploring the Ice Ages

10

 

 

 

Sport Science

PSB002

Structural Kinesiology

10

PSB015

Sport, Ideologies and Values

10

PYB209

Group and Interpersonal Processes in Competitive Sport

10

PYB210

Principles of Exercise Psychology

10

 

4.3       Part I

Four year programme – Candidates registered on the four-year programme will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI. 

CODE

TITLE

GYI003

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

GYI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

  

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2.  GYC400 and GYC401 (instances 1 & 2) are mutually exclusive, as are fieldcourse modules.  Candidates must also choose a combined modular weight of 60 from Sport Science modules over semesters 1 and 2.

Geography

 

Geography

 GYC400

Geography Dissertation (30 credits)

30

The modular weight of GYC400 may be split between semesters in the ratio of either 20:10 or 10:20 depending on the balance of other modular weights selected.

Semester 1

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

Geography

GYC104

Glacial Environments and Landscapes

10

GYC207

Aeolian Processes and Landforms

10

GYC211

Snow, Ice and Society

10

GYC213

Global and World Cities

10

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

10

GYC308

Global Cities Fieldcourse

20

GYC309

Geographies of Home

10

GYC315

Environmental Change and Ecological Response

10

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 1)

20

GYC905

Livelihoods in the Global South Fieldcourse

20

GYC909

Dryland Environments Fieldcourse

20

 

 

 

Sport Science

PSC017

Sport Pedagogy 3

20

PSC024

Sport, the Body and Deviance

10

PYC301

Psychology of Coaching and Physical Education

10

PSC035

Performance Psychology for Sporting Excellence

10

 

Semester 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

 

Geography

GYC107

Regional Worlds

20

GYC108

Climate and Society

20

GYC110

GIS, Modelling and Flood Risk Management

10

GYC200

Conservation: Principles and Practice

10

GYC300

River Dynamics and the Environment

10

GYC214

Geographies of Children and Youth

10

GYC325

Geographies of Transnational Mobility and Diaspora

20

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 2)

20

 

 

 

Sport Science

PSC018

Teaching and Coaching 3

20

PSC023

Sport, Celebrity and Place

10

PSC034

Sports Psychology in Action 

10

PSC032

Physical Activity and Health of Children

20

PYC302

Applied Exercise Psychology 

10

PSC044

Global Issues in Sport

10

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

GY MSci (Hons) Geography

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

This programme is accredited by the Committee of Heads of Environmental Sciences (CHES), the education committee of the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and by the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG).

Final award MSci (Hons)/MSci (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Geography
Programme code GYUM01
Length of programme
UCAS code F840 / F84F
Admissions criteria

MSci(Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/f840

MSci (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/f84f

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with an intellectually-stimulating environment within which they can develop the skills to enable them to comprehend, interpret and analyse the physical world;
  • To enable students to learn about the key concepts, theories and methods within the discipline of  geography;
  • To provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in physical geography;
  • To achieve, through the student learning process, a progressive improvement in academic performance over the degree programme;
  • To enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Geography
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University’s Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School learning and teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

K1   a range of key environmental systems (including lakes, rivers and soils), environmental processes and the impacts of these processes on human activities and vice versa;

K2   the determinants of temporal and spatial variation in the physical, social, economic and political worlds; and the significance of spatial and temporal scale on physical processes, human processes and on their interactions; 

K3   past patterns of environmental and social change, and of the processes and conditions that have determined that change, and the implications for the future;

K4   the idea of Geography as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader disciplinary frameworks of the natural and social sciences and the humanities;

K5   the potential applications of geographical concepts within a broader critical framework;

K6   the range of methods, tools and techniques available to collect, analyse and interpret environmental data for practical problem solving;

K7   how environmental data inform management of environmental systems.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1     develop a reflexive approach to learning;

C2     abstract and synthesise information;

C3    critically assess theories and concepts pivotal to understanding environmental dynamics and systems;

C4     critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text;

C5     undertake problem-solving and decision-making;

C6     develop a reasoned argument;

C7     successfully complete an original piece of research on environmental dynamics, dovetailing both theoretical rigour and data analysis (Independent Research Project).

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1     evaluate and interpret different types of geographical evidence;

P2     recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular geographical debates or enquiries;

P3     undertake safe and effective field and laboratory work;

P4     understand the merits and limitations of different methods for the collection of quantitative and qualitative data relevant to geographical enquiry and use appropriate methods for the analysis of these data;

P5     prepare effective maps and diagrams using a range of appropriate software tools (e.g. SPSS, MATLAB, ArcGIS);

P6     design and execute a piece of research and produce a report;

P7     synthesise research results and, if appropriate, recommend management policy;

P8     interpret, write-up and present quantitative and qualitative data.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should demonstrate competence in:

T1     verbal and written communication skills, including assimilation and communication of material of a technical nature;

T2     problem-solving and analysis of numerical data from a variety of sources;

T3     field and laboratory skills, including evaluation of the risks involved in collecting and analysing environmental data and development of appropriate risk mitigation strategies;

T4     spatial awareness and observation skills;

T5     identification, retrieval, sorting and exchange relevant information from conventional and on-line sources;

T6     independent study and group work;

T7     time management;

T8     costing and planning the resource allocation for a research proposal.

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the module weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

4.1       Part A – Introductory Modules

Candidates must take all designated compulsory modules (combined weight of 120)

Semesters 1 and 2

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYA106

Tutorials

10

Semester 1

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYA007

Cartography and Digital Mapping

10

GYA008

Global Environmental Change at Local Scale

10

GYA201

Earth System Science

20

GYA206

Practising Physical Geography Residential Fieldcourse

20

Semester 2

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYA112

Environmental Hazards: from Mitigation to Management

20

GYA203

Quantitative Methods in Physical Geography

20

GYA210

Environmental Hazards: Measuring and Monitoring

10

4.2       Part B – Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYB327

Geographical Research: Design and Practice

20

GYB230

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

20

GYB240

Environmental Systems and Resource Management

20

GYB201

Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Systems

20

Semester 1

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYB328

Physical Geography Fieldcourse

20

OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a total of 20 weight of optional modules across the year.

Candidates must have 120 weight of modules (compulsory plus optional) per Part, but may split them 60/60 or 70/50 across semesters. Candidates may take up to 20 credits of human geography modules or modules from other Departments/Schools with the approval of the Director of Studies.

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYB311

River Ecology

10

Semester 2

OPTIONAL MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYB308

Forest Ecology

10

GYB400

Exploring the Ice Ages

10

4.3       Part I

Five year programme – Candidates registered on the five-year programme will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI. Part I can only be included between Parts B and C.

Code

Title

GYI003

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

GYI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

  

4.4       Part C – Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYC500

Geography Dissertation (40 credits)

40

Semester 1

OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a total of 80 weight of optional modules across the year.

Candidates must have 120 weight of modules (compulsory plus optional) per Part, but may split them 50/70, 60/60 or 70/50 across semesters. Candidates may take up to 20 credits of human geography modules or modules from other Departments/Schools with the approval of the Director of Studies.

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYC104

Glacial Environments and Landscapes

10

GYC207

Aeolian Processes and Landforms

10

GYC211

Snow, Ice and Society

10

GYC315

Environmental Change and Ecological Response

10

GYC909

Dryland Environments Fieldcourse

20

Semester 2

OPTIONAL MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYC108

Climate and Society

20

GYC110

GIS and Flood Management

10

GYC200

Conservation: Principles and Practice

10

GYC300

River Dynamics and the Environment

10

4.5 Part D – Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYD500

Independent Research Project

60

GYD037

Professional Practice in Environmental Management

10

Semester 1

COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYD025

Research Design

10

Semester 1

OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a total of 40 weight of optional modules across the year. Candidates must have 120 weight of modules (compulsory plus optional) per Part, but may split them 50/70, 60/60 or 70/50 across semesters. 

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYD021

Tools for River Management

20

GYD023

Lake Monitoring and Management

20

GYD035

Hydroclimatological Monitoring and Modelling

20

Semester 2

OPTIONAL MODULES

Code

Title

Module Weight

GYD029

Applied Environmental GIS

10

GYD033

Wind Erosion Measurement and Mitigation

10

GYD034

Evidence-based Environmental Management

10

GYD036

Natural Hazard and Catastrophe Modelling for Environmental Management

10

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to Part C, and from Part C to Part D, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX, but also must achieve a Part Average mark of 55% or greater in Part B and a Part Average mark of 55% or greater in Part C.

Candidates who, after reassessment, fail to achieve a Part Average mark of 55% or greater at Part C will not progress to Part D, but may, at the discretion of the Examiners, be eligible for consideration for the award of BSc Geography with a classification based on the candidate’s performance in Parts B and C and determined on the basis of the Part weightings for the BSc programme (40:60).

Candidates who, after reassessment, fail to qualify for the award of Extended Honours Degree in Part D may, at the discretion of the Examiners, be awarded a BSc in Geography with a classification based on the candidate’s performance in Parts B and C and determined on the basis of the Part weightings for the BSc programme (40:60).

In exceptional circumstances, any candidate who, having successfully completed Part C, is unable to commence or complete Part D, may, at the discretion of the Programme Board, be awarded the degree of BSc in Geography with a classification corresponding to the candidate’s achievements in the Part B and Part C assessments and determined on the basis of the weightings given for the BSc programme.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C and D. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 20%: Part C 40%: Part D 40% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

GY BA/BSc (Hons) Geography

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Programmes are accredited by the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG).

Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DPS/DIntS; BSc (Hons)/BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Geography
Programme code GYUB06/GYUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programme is normally six semesters (three years), or eight semesters (four years) for students who undertake an academic year abroad (Part I). For students entering from 2014/15, the opportunity to undertake professional training via an approved industrial/work placement (Part I) will be available.
UCAS code L700 / L701; F800 / F801
Admissions criteria

BA (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l700

BA (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l701

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/f800

BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/f801

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually-stimulating environment within which they can develop the skills to enable them to comprehend, interpret and analyse the social and physical worlds;
  • to enable students to learn about the key concepts, theories and methods within the discipline of  geography;
  • to provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in human and physical geography;
  • to achieve, through the student learning process, a progressive improvement in academic performance over the degree programme;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The QAA Benchmark Statement for geography

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • a range of environments, environmental processes and the impacts of these processes on human activities and vice versa;
  • the ways in which representations and interpretations of the world are socially-constructed, and the forms of geographical difference;
  • the determinants of temporal and spatial variation in the physical, social, economic and political worlds; and the significance of spatial and temporal scale on physical processes, human processes and on their interactions;
  • past patterns of environmental and social changes, and of the processes and conditions that have determined those changes, and the implications for the future;
  • the idea of Geography as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader disciplinary frameworks of the natural and social sciences and the humanities;
  • the potential applications of geographical concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of geographical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  1. Develop a reflexive approach to learning.
  2. Abstract and synthesise information.
  3. Assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments.
  4. Critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text.
  5. Undertake problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Develop a reasoned argument.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  1. Combine and interpret different types of geographical evidence.
  2. Recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular geographical debates or enquiries.
  3. Undertake safe and effective field and laboratory work.
  4. Employ a range of survey skills for the collection of qualitative and quantitative data relevant to geographical enquiry and use appropriate methods for the analysis of these data.
  5. Prepare effective maps and diagrams using a range of appropriate technologies.
  6. Design and execute a piece of research and produce a report.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should demonstrate competence in: 

  1. Verbal and written communication skills.
  2. Numeracy and computational skills.
  3. Field and laboratory skills.
  4. Spatial awareness and observational skills.
  5. IT and information handling and retrieval.
  6. Independent study and group work.
  7. Time management.

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.  Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters.  Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20 or 40, this shall be split equally between semesters.

Due to timetabling constraints, not all option combinations may be available.

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

Candidates must take all designated compulsory modules and have the option of taking a 10 credit Language module in each semester. Students not taking a language module will take compulsory modules and option group A. Students taking a language module may choose a preference for human (Option Group B) or physical geography (Option Group C) in each semester.

Semesters 1 and 2

 (i)        COMPULSORY MODULE                        (total modular weight 10)

  

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYA106

Academic and Professional Skills for Geography

10

 

Semester 1

 (i)        COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 30)

 

GYA006

Practising Geography – Residential Fieldcourse

10

GYA007

Cartography, Digital Mapping & GIS

10

GYA101

Earth System Science

10

 

(ii)         OPTIONAL MODULE GROUPS                   (total modular weight 30)

 

OPTION GROUP A – No Language Module

GYA002

Geographies of Global Economic Change

20

GYA008

Global Environmental Change at Local Scale

10

  

 

OPTION GROUP B – Language Module and Human Geography Preference

GYA002

Geographies of Global Economic Change

20

LAN***

Module from the University Wide Language Programme

10

 

 

 OPTION GROUP C – Language Module and Physical Geography Preference

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

GYA008

Global Environmental Change at Local Scale

10

LAN***

Module from the University Wide Language Programme

10

 

Semester 2

 

 (i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                        (total modular weight 10)

 

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYA003

Quantitative Methods in Geography

10

 

(ii)         OPTIONAL MODULE GROUPS                   (total modular weight 40)

 

OPTION GROUP A – No Language Module

GYA102

Geographies of Identity

20

GYA112

Environmental Hazards: from mitigation to management

20

  

 

OPTION GROUP B – Language Module and Human Geography Preference

GYA102

Geographies of Identity

20

GYA110

Environmental Hazards: from mitigation to management

10

LAN***

Module from the University Wide Language Programme

10

 

 

 OPTION GROUP C – Language Module and Physical Geography Preference

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

GYA112

Environmental Hazards: from mitigation to management

20

LAN***

Module from the University Wide Language Programme

10

  

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

 (i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                          (total modular weight 20)

 

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYB327

Geographical Research: Design and Practice

20

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES

In addition to compulsory the module GYB327, candidates must choose a minimum modular weight of 60 from Group 1 modules over semesters 1 and 2, this must include at least ONE human geography module (GYB210/GYB220) and at least ONE physical geography module (GYB230/GYB240).  The remaining 40 modular weights may be chosen from modules in Groups 1, 2 and 3 over semesters 1 and 2, of which a maximum of 20 can be from Group 3.  Fieldcourse modules GYB328 and GYB901 in Group 2 are mutually exclusive.

Group 1

 

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYB210

Globalization

20

GYB220

Geographies of Social Difference

20

GYB230

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

20

GYB240

Environmental Systems and Resource Management

20

GYB201

Remote Sensing and GIS

20

 

Semester 1

 (i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

 Group 2

 

GYB110

Sustainable Urban Geographies

10

GYB311

River Ecology

10

GYB328

Physical Geography Fieldcourse

20

GYB901

Human Geography Fieldcourse

20

 

Group 3

Modules from other Departments/Schools within the University's Module Catalogue, subject to availability and School approval.

Semester 2

 (i)        OPTIONAL MODULES

 Group 2

 

GYB113

Geographies of Culture, Media and Representation

10

GYB308

Forest Ecology

10

GYB320

Global Migration

10

GYB400

Exploring the Ice Ages

10

 

Group 3

Modules from other Departments/Schools within the University's Module Catalogue, subject to availability and School approval.

4.3       Part I

Four year programme – Candidates registered on the four-year programme will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

CODE

TITLE

GYI003

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

GYI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE                          (total modular weight 40)

 

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYC500

Geography Dissertation (40 credits)

40

The modular weight of GYC500 must be split equally (20:20) between semesters 1 & 2.

 

Semester 1

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

Candidates must choose a modular weight of 80 over semesters 1 and 2, of which a maximum of 20 can be from modules offered by other Departments/Schools.  Fieldcourse modules are mutually exclusive. 

 

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYC104

Glacial Environments and Landscapes

10

GYC207

Aeolian Processes and Landforms

10

GYC211

Snow, Ice and Society

10

GYC213

Global and World Cities

10

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

10

GYC308

Global Cities Fieldcourse

20

GYC309

Geographies of Home

10

GYC315

Environmental Change and Ecological Response

10

GYC905

Livelihoods in the Global South Fieldcourse

20

GYC909

Dryland Environments Fieldcourse

20

plus modules from other Departments/Schools within the University's Module Catalogue, subject to availability and School approval.

Semester 2

(i)         OPTIONAL MODULES

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYC107

Regional Worlds

20

GYC108

Climate and Society

20

GYC110

GIS, Modelling and Flood Risk Management

10

GYC200

Conservation: Principles and Practice

10

GYC300

River Dynamics and the Environment

10

GYC214

Geographies of Children and Youth

10

GYC325

Geographies of Transnational Mobility and Diaspora

20

plus modules from other Departments/Schools within the University's Module Catalogue, subject to availability and School approval.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60%  to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

GY BSc (Hons) Geography with Economics

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

This programme is accredited by the Royal Geographical Society with the Institute of British Geographers (RGS-IBG).

Final award BSc (Hons)/BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Geography with Economics
Programme code GYUB02
Length of programme The duration of the programme is normally six semesters (three years), or eight semesters (four years) for students who undertake professional training via an approved industrial/work placement or an academic year abroad (Part I).
UCAS code LL17 / LL18
Admissions criteria

BSc (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ll17

BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ll18

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide students with an intellectually-stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in both geography and economics;
  • to provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in both human and physical geography and in economics;
  • to achieve, through the student learning process, a progressive improvement in academic performance over the degree programme;
  • to enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Geography and Economics

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of  data;
  • the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader frameworks of the sciences and humanities;

and within the Geography portion of the programme: 

  • a range of environments, in the broadest sense, of environmental processes and the impacts of these processes on human activities and vice versa;
  • the ways in which representations and interpretations of the world are socially-constructed, and the forms of geographical difference;
  • the determinants of temporal and spatial variation in the physical, social, economic and political worlds; and the significance of spatial and temporal scale on physical processes, human processes and on their interactions;
  • past patterns of environmental and social changes, and of the processes and conditions that have determined those changes, and the implications for the future;

and within the Economics portion of the programme:

  • demonstrate the attributes of a graduate in terms of possessing transferable skills, and the ability to analyse fact and opinion based on the evaluation of evidence;
  • communicate knowledge and analysis in an effective and objective manner;
  • analyse issues of economic theory and policy using up-to-date models and techniques.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Develop a reflexive approach to learning. 
  2. Abstract and synthesise information.
  3. Assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and  arguments.
  4. Critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text.
  5. Undertake problem-solving and decision-making.
  6. Develop a reasoned argument.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Combine and interpret different types of evidence including data and text.
  2. Recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries.
  3. Employ a range of survey skills for the collection of qualitative and quantitative data and to use appropriate methods for the analysis of these data.
  4. Design and execute a piece of research and produce a report.

Additionally, within the Geography portion of the programme 

  1. Prepare effective maps and diagrams using a range of appropriate  technologies. 
  2. Undertake safe and effective field and laboratory work.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should show competence in:

  1. Verbal and written communication skills. 
  2. Numeracy and computational skills. 
  3. Field and laboratory skills. 
  4. Spatial awareness and observational skills. 
  5. IT and information handling and retrieval. 
  6. Independent study and group work. 
  7. Time management.

4. Programme structure

Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 in each Part with a minimum modular weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules. Individual modules taught and assessed over both semesters with a modular weight of 10 may count against either semester 1 or semester 2, depending on the balance of other modular weights between semesters. Where the modular weight of a module taught and assessed over both semesters is 20, this shall be split equally between semesters. 

 

Due to timetabling constraints, not all option combinations may be available.

 

4.1   Part A - Introductory Modules

Semesters 1 and 2

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                            (total modular weight 50) 

 

Economics

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

ECA501

Introduction to Macroeconomics

20

ECA502

Introduction to Microeconomics

20

 

 

Geography

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

GYA106

Academic and Professional Skills for Geography

10

 

Semester 1 

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                            (total modular weight 40) 

 

Geography

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

GYA006

Practising Geography – Residential Fieldcourse

10

GYA007

Cartography, Digital Mapping and GIS

10

GYA101

Earth System Science

10

  

Semester 2 

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULES                          (total modular weight 30) 

 

Geography

GYA003

Quantitative Methods in Geography

10

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

GYA110

Environmental Hazards: from mitigation to management

10

  

4.2        Part B - Degree Modules 

Candidates must choose a combined modular weight of 80 from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2, of which at least 40 must be from Group 1. Fieldcourse modules GYB328 and GYB901 in Group 2 are mutually exclusive. In addition, candidates should have a combined modular weight of 40 from Economics modules over semesters 1 and 2. 

Semesters 1 and 2 

(i)         COMPULSORY MODULE 

 

Economics

CODE

TITLE

MODULAR WEIGHT

ECB016

History of Economic Thought

20

 

 (ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

Economics

ECB004

Introduction to Financial Economics

20

ECB005

International Economic Relations

20

ECB015

Economics of the Financial System

20

 

 

Geography – Group 1

GYB201

Remote Sensing and GIS

20

GYB210

Globalization

20

GYB220

Geographies of Social Difference

20

GYB230

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms

20

GYB240

Environmental Systems and Resource Management

20

GYB327

Geographical Research: Design and Practice
(pre-requisite for the dissertation)

20

  

 Semester 1

 (i)          OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

Economics

ECB136

Transport Economics

20

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB110

Sustainable Urban Geographies

10

GYB311

River Ecology

10

GYB328

Physical Geography Fieldcourse

20

GYB901

Human Geography Fieldcourse

20

  

 Semester 2 

(ii)          OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

Economics

ECB035

The Economics of Social Issues

20

 

 

Geography – Group 2

GYB113

Geographies of Culture, Media and Representation

10

GYB308

Forest Ecology

10

GYB320

Global Migration

10

GYB400

Exploring the Ice Ages

10

 

4.3        Part I 

Four year programme – Candidates registered on the four-year programme will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

CODE

TITLE

GYI003

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

GYI004

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

4.4        Part C - Degree Modules 

Semesters 1 and 2 

(i)          OPTIONAL MODULES 

Candidates must choose 40 modular weights from Economics modules over semesters 1 and 2 from remaining modules of the same title, not taken at Part B. In addition, candidates must choose 80 modular weights from Geography modules over semesters 1 and 2. GYC400 and GYC401 (instances 1 & 2) are mutually exclusive, as are fieldcourse modules. 

 

Economics

ECC012

Introduction to Financial Economics

20

ECC013

International Economic Relations

20

ECC014

Economics of the Financial System

20

 

 

Geography

 GYC400

Geography Dissertation (30 credit)

30

  

The modular weight of GYC400 may be split between semesters in the ratio of either 20:10 or 10:20 depending on the balance of other modular weights selected.

Semester 1 

(ii)          OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

Economics

ECC019

Transport Economics

20

 

 

Geography

GYC104

Glacial Environments and Landscapes

10

GYC207

Aeolian Processes and Landforms

10

GYC211

Snow, Ice and Society

10

GYC213

Global and World Cities

10

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

10

GYC308

Global Cities Fieldcourse

20

GYC309

Geographies of Home

10

GYC315

Environmental Change and Ecological Response

10

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 1)

20

GYC905

Livelihoods in the Global South Fieldcourse

20

GYC909

Dryland Environments Fieldcourse

20

 

 Semester 2

 (iii)          OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

Economics

ECC017

Economics of Social Issues

20

 

 

Geography

GYC107

Regional Worlds

20

GYC108

Climate and Society

20

GYC110

GIS, Modelling and Flood Risk Management

10

GYC200

Conservation: Principles and Practice

10

GYC300

River Dynamics and the Environment

10

GYC214

Geographies of Children and Youth

10

GYC325

Geographies of Transnational Mobility and Diaspora

20

GYC401

Independent Geographical Essay (instance 2)

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) History and English (entry prior to 2018)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons)+DPS/BA (Hons)+DIntS
Programme title History and English
Programme code EUUB08
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 Semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign university.
UCAS code VQ13/VQ14
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/phir/historyandenglish/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in both History and English.
  • To encourage a sense of enthusiasm for History and English; to foster critical, creative and independent thinking; and to develop a sensitive and disciplined approach.
  • To stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in both subjects.
  • To develop competence and practical skills which are transferable to a wide range of professions and employment as well as life experiences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA History Benchmark Statement
  • QAA English Benchmark Statement

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader framework of the social sciences and humanities;
  • the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of texts and other sources; 

and within the History portion of the programme:

  • past societies and historical processes over a chronological and geographical range;
  • the use of primary evidence in historical argument;
  • History as an academic discipline, its schools of interpretations, and the variety of methodological approaches and theoretical foundations;

and within the English portion of the programme:

  • a range of authors and texts from different periods of literary history, including those before 1800;
  • the distinctive characteristics of the different literary genres of fiction, poetry and drama;
  • an appreciation of the structure and function of the English language;
  • an appreciation of the power of imagination in literary creation and an awareness of the range and variety of contemporary approaches to literary study;
  • practical experience of a range of research and critical methods in English;
  • an awareness of the role of culture in a changing landscape of literary production; the ability to understand the epistemological underpinnings of different research traditions in the subject area.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

1.  demonstrate a reflexive approach to learning;

2.  abstract and synthesise information;

3.  assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments;

4.  critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including texts and other sources;

5.  undertake problem-solving and decision-making;

6.  develop a reasoned argument;

additionally, within the History portion of the programme:

7.  appreciate the complexities and diversity of past events and mentalities;

8.  show a critical awareness of the problems inherent in historical sources and in interpreting the past;

9. solve problems with imagination and creativity.

and within the English portion of the programme:

10.  on successful completion of the programme students will have acquired critical skills in the close reading and analysis of texts and will have a thorough understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to English studies;

11.  they will have an appreciation of the central role of language in the creation of meaning and will have gained rhetorical skills of effective communication and argument.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. locate and retrieve information using a variety of research methods;
  2. select, combine, and interpret different types of source material;
  3. deploy bibliographic skills including accuracy in the citation of sources and the use of proper conventions in the presentation of scholarly work
  4. present cogent and persuasive arguments in oral, written and practical form;
  5. undertake independent learning and research;
  6. recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to handle complex information in a structured, systematic and analytical way. They should be able to participate effectively in group work using communication effectively, including dialogue, writing formats and visualisation. They should possess effective organisational and time-management skills. They should posses an independence of mind, creativity and intellectual maturity. 

4. Programme structure

4.1

(1)      Candidates normally study a total modular weight of 60 credits in both History and English in each academic year (Parts A, B and C).  However, candidates may take 20 credits of Language options in each Part, chosen from a list produced by the School of Social Sciences, depending on their previous qualifications.  These candidates must take at least 50 credits in both History and English in Parts A and B, and at least 40 credits in both History and English in Part C.

(2)        Candidates must take at least 20 credits in History and 20 credits in English in each Semester.

(3)       Candidates must take a total modular weight of 120 in each Part with a minimum module weight of 50 in each semester, taking into account both compulsory and optional modules.

(4)          Due to timetabling constraints, not all option combinations may be available.

4.2          Content 

(1) Part A – Introductory Modules

Students must be registered for a minimum of 50 credits and a maximum of 70 credits in each Semester

History Component

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Introduction to Academic Studies

1

10

EUA704

What is History?

2

10

(ii)  Optional Modules (total modular weight 40 Credits)

Students can either take a 20 credit module in each semester, or a 10 credit module with a language option.

Code

Title

Modular Weight

Semester 1

 

Either:

 

EUA701

Modern Europe: From the Enlightenment to the Present (20 Credit)

20

Or, for candidates taking a Language Option:

 

EUA702

Modern Europe: From the Enlightenment to the Present (10 Credit)

10

Language Option - One 10 credit module from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications

10

Semester 2

 

Either

 

EUA703

Modern World History: New Perspectives (20 Credit)

20

Or, for candidates taking a Language Option:

 

EUA707

Modern World History: New Perspectives (10 Credit)

10

Language Option - One 10 credit module from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications

10

English Component

(i)  Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 Credits)

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EAA777

Narrative Forms and Fictions

1

20

EAA888

Literary and Critical Theories

2

20

(ii)  Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EAA011

Writing in History

2

20

EAA001

Introduction to Film Studies

2

20

EAA200

How to Do Things with Digital Text

2

20

(2) Part B – Degree Modules

EITHER  

(a)  Standard Route

N.B. Candidates choosing Language modules (10 credits in each Semester) should include these modules as part of the English component.

History Component

(i) COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB735

Understanding History

1

10

EUB800

Research Design

2

10

 (ii)  OPTIONAL MODULES (total modular weight 40 Credits)

Candidates should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB633

Enterprise, Employability and Personal Development

1

10

EUB712

Modern Germany: Recovery from Ruin, 1945-present

1

20

EUB722

Modern France: A History of Conflict?

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values: Sex, Race, Religion and Deviance in 19th Century Britain

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics and Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB702

Cold War Europe

2

20

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective

2

20

EUB724

Slavery in Global History

2

20

EUB732

Modern Russia from Emancipation to Revolution

2

20

English Component

(i)  Compulsory Modules

None

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 60 Credits)

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EAB008

Victorian Literature

1

20

EAB035

Weird Tale

1

20

EAB039

Nineteenth Century American Literature

1

20

EAB012

African American Culture

2

20

EAB114

An Introduction to Creative Writing

2

20

EAB711

Eighteenth Century Literature

2

20

EAB712

Modernisms

2

20

EAB715

Modern Irish Literature

2

20

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

OR

(b)  INTERNATIONAL SEMESTER ROUTE

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by the School of Social Sciences, along with a Distance learning Research Design module. Candidates must register for a total of 20 credits of History modules and 40 credits of English modules in Semester 1.  Candidates should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive. 

 

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Semester 1

 

 

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB712

Modern Germany: Recovery from Ruin, 1945-Present

1

20

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective

1

20

EUB722

Modern France: A History of Conflict?

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values: Sex, Race, Religion and Deviance in 19th Century Britain

1

20

EUB633

Enterprise, Employability and Personal Development

1

10

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

EAB008

Victorian Literature

1

20

EAB035

Weird Tale

1

20

EAB039

Nineteenth Century American Literature

1

20

Semester 2

 

 

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

 (3)          Part I

Candidates following the four-year programme are required to undertake a Part I placement, which occurs between Parts B and C and may be EITHER (i) an academic year abroad at a French-, German- or Spanish-speaking university, following an approved course of study leading to the Diploma in International Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI; OR (ii) an academic year abroad on an approved course of study at a foreign university where teaching is in English leading to the Diploma in International Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI; OR (iii) an approved Teaching Assistantship at a school or other approved placement in a French-, German- or Spanish-speaking country, leading to the Diploma in International Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI; OR (iv) an approved placement in the UK or abroad leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.  Participation in a Part I study abroad or placement is subject to School approval and satisfactory academic performance during Parts A and B.

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

One module from:

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

EAC009

English Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

Students taking Languages modules (10 Credits in each Semester) should choose these modules as part of the English Component if taking the Dissertation module EUC800 OR as part of the History Component if taking the English Dissertation EAC009.

 

History Component

Students must choose History modules to the value of 60 Credits from the following list. Students who have chosen to take EUC800 Dissertation should take a further 20 Credits of History modules to total 60 Credits for this component.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

1

20

EUC716

Empire, War and Popular Culture in Britain, c. 1880-1930

1

20

EUC689

Sex, Death and Decadence: Culture and Politics in the Age of Anxiety

2

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

EUC721

Forgotten Fronts – The Second World War in East Asia

2

20

Languages

 

 

Two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

20

 

English Component

Students must choose English modules to the value of 60 Credits from the following list.  Students who have chosen to take EAC009 English Dissertation should take a further 20 Credits of English modules to total 60 Credits for this Component.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EAC002

The Return of the King, Literature 1660-1714

1

20

EAC016

Cruel and Unusual: Punishment on trial in American Culture

1

20

EAC440

The Modern Poet

1

20

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in 1890s

2

20

EAC300

Adapting Shakespeare

2

20

EAC701

Global America

2

20

Languages

 

 

Two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) History and International Relations

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/ BA (Hons)+DIntS/BA (Hons)+DPS
Programme title History and International Relations
Programme code EUUB06
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 Semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign university.
UCAS code VL12/VL1G
Admissions criteria

BA (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/vl12

BA (Hons)+DIntS/DPS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/vl1g

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in both History and International Relations.
  • To encourage a sense of enthusiasm for History and International Relations; to foster critical, creative and independent thinking; and to develop a sensitive and disciplined approach.
  • To stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in both subjects.
  • To develop competence and practical skills which are transferable to a wide range of professions and employment as well as life experiences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmarking Statement - History
  • QAA Subject Benchmarking Statement – Politics and International Relations

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader framework of the social sciences and humanities;
  • the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of texts, other sources and data;

and within the History portion of the programme:

  • past societies and historical processes over a chronological and geographical range;
  • the use of primary evidence in historical argument;
  • History as an academic discipline, its schools of interpretations, and the variety of methodological approaches and theoretical foundations;

and within the International Relations portion of the programme:

  • how states, international organisations and other transnational actors interact (both cooperatively and conflictually) within regional and global arenas;
  • related questions of power, conflict, justice, order, legitimacy, decision-making and governance at the global and regional levels
  • approaches derived from international political theory and political analysis;
  • appropriate research methods and methodologies and how to apply these.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate a reflexive approach to learning;
  2. abstract and synthesise information;
  3. assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments;
  4. critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including texts, other sources and data;
  5. undertake problem-solving and decision-making;
  6. develop a reasoned argument;

and within the History portion of the programme:

  1. appreciate the complexities and diversity of past events and mentalities;
  2. show a critical awareness of the problems inherent in historical sources and in interpreting the past;
  3. solve problems with imagination and creativity;

and within the International Relations portion of the programme: 

  1. describe, evaluate and, where appropriate, critique political events, ideas and institutions operating at regional and global levels of analysis;
  2. relate theory and political analysis to questions of ethical, moral and public concern at regional and global levels of analysis. 
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. locate and retrieve information using a variety of research methods;
  2. select, combine, and interpret different types of source material;
  3. recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries;
  4. deploy bibliographic skills including accuracy in the citation of sources and the use of proper conventions in the presentation of scholarly work;
  5. present cogent and persuasive arguments in oral, written and practical form;
  6. undertake independent learning and research
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed skills in the areas of communication, presentations, self-organisation, working with others and time-management, and gained experience of using information and communication technologies for the retrieval and presentation of information.

4. Programme structure

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

 

History Component

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA705

The Atlantic World: the Americas, Europe and Africa since the 15th Century

1

20

EUA704

What is History?

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Either

 

 

EUA800

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order (20 Credit)

2

20

Or, for candidates taking a Language Option:

 

 

EUA803

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order (10 Credit)

2

10

And

 

 

 

Languages

 

 

A 10-Credit module from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

2

10

 

International Relations Component

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA801

Power, Politics and Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA610

Conceptions of Democracy

2

10

EUA617

International Political Theory

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Either:

 

 

EUA601

Contemporary World Arena (20 Credit)

1

20

Or, for candidates taking a Language Option:

 

 

EUA620

Contemporary World Arena (10 Credit)

1

10

And

 

 

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

 

 

Part B – Degree Modules

 

EITHER

 

(a) Standard Route

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories & Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB735

Understanding History

1

10

EUB800

Research Design*

2

10

 

* Please note that this module counts as 10 of the 30 credits in Semester 2 for either the History or International Relations components.

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

Students should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Students should choose a total modular weight of 50 Credits, with no more than 30 Credits in either Semester from both the History and International Relations components. Please note that modules in Group 3 count as either History or International Relations.

 

Group 1 - History Component

Students should choose a total modular weight of 50 Credits, with no more than 30 Credits in either Semester from this component.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

1

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB724

Slavery in Global History

2

20

 

Group 2 - International Relations Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

2

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB637

Political Simulation

2

10

EUB639

From Rebellion to Partition: British India 1857-1947

2

20

SSB352

Political Communication (10 wgt version)

2

10

 

Group 3 – History or International Relations

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

 

OR

 

(b) International Semester Route

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by Politics and International Studies, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module. Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 Credits in Semester 1.

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 70 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB735

Understanding History

1

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 50 Credits)

 

History Component

Students should choose a total modular weight of 20 Credits in Semester 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

 

International Relations Component

Students should choose a total modular weight of 30 Credits in Semester 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

 

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

 

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

Students should take 60 Credits in the History Component and 60 Credits in the International Relations Component.  The Dissertation weight of 40 Credits will be split equally between the two components, so students will need to choose 80 Credits of optional modules, 40 in each Component.

 

History Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

1

20

EUC716

Empire, War and Popular Culture in Britain, c.1880-1930

1

20

EUC689

Sex, Death and Decadence: Culture and Politics in the Age of Anxiety

2

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

EUC721

Forgotten Fronts – The Second World War in East Asia

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

 

International Relations Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence & Terrorism

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

1

20

EUC682

International Politics of the Middle East

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

1

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics & Participation in the Digital Age

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) History and Politics

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DPS/BA (Hons) +DIntS
Programme title History and Politics
Programme code EUUB05
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 Semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign university.
UCAS code VL1F/VL1H
Admissions criteria

BA (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/vl1f

BA (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/vl1h

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in both History and Politics.
  • To encourage a sense of enthusiasm for History and Politics; to foster critical, creative and independent thinking; and to develop a sensitive and disciplined approach.
  • To stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in both subjects.
  • To develop competence and practical skills which are transferable to a wide range of professions and employment as well as life experiences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmarking Statement - History
  • QAA Subject Benchmarking Statement – Politics and International Relations

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader framework of the social sciences and humanities;
  • the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;
  • the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of texts, other sources and data;

and within the History portion of the programme:

  • past societies and historical processes over a chronological and geographical range;
  • the use of primary evidence in historical argument;
  • History as an academic discipline, its schools of interpretations, and the variety of methodological approaches and theoretical foundations;

and within the Politics portion of the programme:

  • how peoples, ideas and institutions interact and how values and resources are allocated through government and society;
  • related questions of power, conflict, justice, order, legitimacy and decision-making;
  • approaches derived from political theory and political analysis;
  • appropriate research methods and methodologies and how to apply these

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. demonstrate a reflexive approach to learning;
  2. abstract and synthesise information;
  3. assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments;
  4. critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including texts, other sources and data;
  5. undertake problem-solving and decision-making;
  6. develop a reasoned argument;

 and within the History portion of the programme: 

  1. appreciate the complexities and diversity of past events and mentalities;
  2. show a critical awareness of the problems inherent in historical sources and in interpreting the past;
  3. solve problems with imagination and creativity; 

and within the Politics portion of the programme: 

  1.  describe, evaluate and, where appropriate, critique political events, ideas and institutions;
  1. relate theory and political analysis to questions of ethical, moral and public concern.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. locate and retrieve information using a variety of research methods;
  2. select, combine, and interpret different types of source material;
  3. recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries;
  4. deploy bibliographic skills including accuracy in the citation of sources and the use of proper conventions in the presentation of scholarly work
  5. present cogent and persuasive arguments in oral, written and practical form;
  6. undertake independent learning and research
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed skills in the areas of communication, presentations, self-organisation, working with others and time-management, and gained experience of using information and communication technologies for the retrieval and presentation of information.

4. Programme structure

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

 

History Component

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA705

Atlantic World

1

20

EUA704

What is History?

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Either:

 

 

EUA800

The Making & Unmaking of the World Order (20 Credit)

2

20

Or, for candidates taking a Language Option:

 

 

EUA803

The Making & Unmaking of the World Order (10 Credit)

2

10

and

 

 

 

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module, to be taken in Semester 2, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

2

10

 

Politics Component

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA801

Power, Politics & Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA617

International Political Theory

2

10

EUA805

British Politics and Government

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Either:

 

 

EUA601

Contemporary World Arena (20 Credit)

1

20

Or, for candidates taking a Language Option:

 

 

EUA620

Contemporary World Arena (10 Credit)

1

10

And

 

 

 

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module, to be taken in Semester 1, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

 

 

Part B – Degree Modules

 

EITHER

 

(a) Standard Route

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories & Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB735

Understanding History

1

10

EUB800

Research Design *

2

10

* Please note this module counts as 10 of the 30 Credits in Semester 2 for either the History component or the Politics Component

 

 

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

Students should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Students should choose a total modular weight of 50 Credits, with no more than 30 Credits in either Semester from both the History and Politics components. Please note that modules in Group 3 count as either History or Politics.

 

Group 1 - History Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

1

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB724

Slavery in Global History

2

20

 

Group 2 - Politics Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

2

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB637

Political Simulation

2

10

EUB638

The Politics of Star Wars

2

20

EUB639

From Rebellion to Partition: British India 1857-1947

2

20

SSB352

Political Communication (10 wgt version)

2

10

 

Group 3 - History or Politics

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, to be taken in Semesters 1 & 2, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

 

OR

 

(b) International Semester Route

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by Politics and International Studies, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module. Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 Credits in Semester 1.

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 70 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB735

Understanding History

1

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 50 Credits)

 

Students should choose a total modular weight of 20 Credits from the History component and 30 Credits from the Politics Component.  . Please note that modules in Group 3 count as either History or Politics.

 

 

 

Group 1 - History Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

1

20

 

Group 2 - Politics Component

Students should choose a total modular weight of 30 Credits from this component.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module, to be taken in Semester 1, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

 

Group 3 – History or Politics

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

 

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

Students should take 60 Credits in the History Component and 60 Credits in the Politics Component.  The Dissertation weight of 40 Credits will be split equally between the two components, so students will need to choose 80 Credits of optional modules, 40 in each component.

 

History Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

1

20

EUC716

Empire, War & Popular Culture in Britain, c.1880-1930

1

20

EUC689

Sex, Death and Decadence: Culture and Politics in the Age of Anxiety

2

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

EUC721

Forgotten Fronts – The Second World War in East Asia

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, to be taken in Semesters 1 & 2, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

 

Politics Component

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence & Terrorism

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

1

20

EUC660

Contemporary Political Philosophy

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

1

20

EUC680

The Populist Challenge to Democracy

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

1

20

EUC666

Gender & Politics

2

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics & Participation in the Digital Age

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, to be taken in Semesters 1 & 2, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) International Relations

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/ BA (Hons) + DPS/BA (Hons) + DIntS
Programme title International Relations
Programme code EUUB02
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is either 6 semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign University.
UCAS code L250/L251
Admissions criteria

BA (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l250

BA (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l251

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  1. To introduce students to problems, concepts and debates in International Relations, informed by research at the forefront of contemporary debates.
  2. To provide a comprehensive grounding in International Relations and in the cognate disciplines of political science and area studies, supporting the analysis of the contemporary world arena.
  3. To develop competence in the research strategies and methods of International Relations, including international political theory, international political analysis, the study of international regimes, conflict and crisis management.
  4. To enable students to develop knowledge and understanding of topical issues in International Relations by applying theory to practice and by using practice to reflect on theory.
  5. To foster the acquisition of key transferable skills including critical analysis; appraisal of evidence and formulation of hypothesis based on available information; evaluation of debates in international affairs; appropriately use communication and information technology; and clear communication of ideas.
  6. To broaden perspectives on International Relations through multidisciplinary research, by providing a range of electives from the disciplines of the humanities and social sciences, by enabling students to extend, apply and/or reflect on their learning through training in the UK or abroad and/or through the study of a modern language.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Benchmarking statements for Politics and International Relations
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School Learning and Teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in the discipline

 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

K1. discuss the nature and characteristics of a variety of international actors and phenomena, including the international state system, non-governmental actors and the challenges of international governance;

K2. analyse the major trends and causal factors relevant to the contemporary International System;

K3. explain competing interpretations of international events and approaches to international governance;

K4. apply core concepts and methods used in IR scholarship and in the cognate disciplines of political science and area studies to analyse the international arena;

K5. evaluate principles, methods, ideas and problems drawn from the study of International Relations and cognate disciplines in the humanities and/or the social sciences.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1. choose appropriate research strategies and methods of International Relations to analyse key issues and events;

C2. evaluate leading concepts, ideas, principles and models of International Relations theory;

C3. apply principles and theoretical approaches of International Relations theory to analyse unfolding international events, and formulate coherent solutions to problems of international governance and diplomacy;

C4. use sophisticated argument and analysis to propose solutions to complex problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1. use information technology to retrieve and communicate information to a range of different audiences;

P2. evaluate sources of information and the ethical issues relating to research in International Relations;

P3. undertake independent research under supervision;

P4. organise personal learning and development self-critically.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1. appraise evidence and formulate hypothesis based on available information;

T2. manage time effectively and work to deadlines;

T3. apply research skills and practices to offer interpretations of complex and unfamiliar ideas, abstract concepts, political phenomena and events;

T4. summarise complex scholarly debates;

T5. evaluate alternative solutions to complex problems;

T6. co-operate with others for common benefit.

4. Programme structure

International Relations

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA601

The Contemporary World Arena

1

20

EUA801

Power, Politics & Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA610

Conceptions of Democracy

2

10

EUA617

International Political Theory

2

10

EUA800

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order

2

20

EUA805

British Politics & Government

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

Students must choose 20 credits of optional modules from:

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Geography

 

 

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

1

10

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

2

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSA001

Identities & Inequalities

1

10

SSA002

Global, social and Cultural Change

2

10

SSA201

Introducing Criminology

1

10

SSA202

Understanding Social Policy

2

10

 

Part B – Degree Modules

 

EITHER

 

(a) Standard Route

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB800

Research Design

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

 

In addition to the compulsory modules EUB605 and EUB800, students must choose a minimum modular weight of 80 Credits of Group 1 modules over Semesters 1 and 2.  The remaining 20 Credits may be taken from Groups 1 and 2. Combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Group 1 – International Relations Optional Modules

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

2

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB637

Political Simulation

2

10

EUB638

The Politics of Star Wars

2

20

EUB612

Foreign Policy Analysis (20 Credit)

2

20

EUB621

Foreign Policy Analysis (10 Credit)

2

10

 

Group 2 – Other Optional Modules

Choice of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

BSB580

Operations Management

2

10

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

2

10

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

2

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

1

10

GYB212

Globalization B

2

10

GYB222

Geographies of Global Difference B

2

10

History

 

 

EUB724

Slavery in Global History

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

2

10

 

OR

 

(b) International Semester Route

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by Politics and International Studies, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module. Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 Credits in Semester 1.

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 70 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB605

Theories & Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 50 Credits)

In addition to the compulsory modules EUB605, EUB001 and EUB801, candidates must choose a minimum modular weight of 40 Credits and a maximum modular weight of 50 Credits from Group 1 modules in Semester 1.  If a weight of 40 Credits is chosen from Group 1, candidates should choose a 10 Credit module from Group 2.  Candidates should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Group 1 – International Relations Optional Modules

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

 

Group 2 – Other Optional Modules

Choice of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

 

 

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module, to be taken in Semester 1, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

 

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

In addition to the compulsory module EUC800, students must choose a minimum modular weight of 60 Credits from Group 1 modules over Semesters 1 and 2.  The remaining 20 Credits may be chosen from Groups 1 or 2.

 

Group 1 – International Relations Optional Modules

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence & Terrorism

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

1

20

EUC682

International Politics of the Middle East

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

1

20

EUC688

Critical Security Studies

1

20

EUC666

Gender & Politics

2

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics & Participation in the Digital Age

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

 

Group 2 – Other Optional Modules

Choice of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

1

10

BSC524

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Planning

2

10

BSC575

Leadership & Interpersonal Skills

2

10

Economics

 

 

ECC012

Introduction to Financial Economics

1 & 2

20

Geography

 

 

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

1

10

GYC309

Geographies of Home

1

10

History

 

 

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

1

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSC024

Gender, Sex & Society

1

20

SSC212

Poverty, Pay and Living Standards

2

20

                                                               

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

 

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

 

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) Politics with a Minor Subject (entry prior to 2018)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DPS/BA (Hons) + DIntS
Programme title Politics with a Minor Subject
Programme code EUUB03
Length of programme
UCAS code L200/L201
Admissions criteria

The duration of the Programme is either 6 semesters (three-year Programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year).  The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign University. 

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  1. To introduce the concepts and principles that underpin politics, informed by research that fosters critical and independent thought.
  2. To introduce students to debates about power and distribution which lie at the heart of politics (‘who gets what, when, how and why’) and hone the analytic skills required to determine the legitimacy of distributions.
  3. To engage students in debates about political events, institutions and ideas as a route to their engagement in politics as citizens and actors in the global political arena.
  4. To familiarise students with the methodological and theoretical assumptions which underpin political arguments.
  5. To familiarise students with key concepts in critical political analysis, including power, justice, accountability, order, dissent, violence, sovereignty, governance and decision-making.
  6. To combine the study of politics with related disciplines in humanities and social sciences and to enable students to extend, apply and/or reflect on their learning through training in the UK or abroad and/or through the study of a modern language.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

 

  • QAA Benchmarking statement for Politics and International Relations
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School Learning and Teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in the discipline

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

K1. discuss the nature and characteristics of a variety of political issues, ideas and phenomena;

K2. analyse the social, economic and historical context in which political systems evolve and operate;

K3. explain competing interpretations of political issues and events;

K4. apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of politics to analyse political ideas, institutions and practices;

K5. explain and evaluate concepts of political change such as revolution, war, crisis, protest, agency, and modernity.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

C1. choose appropriate methods in explanatory and normative political theory and political science to investigate key issues and events in politics;

C2. evaluate political opinions, ideas and events and defend personal preferences through reasoned argument;

C3. use supporting evidence and illustrative examples to discuss and/or explain complex political phenomena and events;

C4. use sophisticated argument and analysis to propose solutions to complex problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

P1. use information technology to retrieve information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and to communicate ideas orally, visually and in writing;

P2. evaluate sources and the ethical issues relating to research in politics;

P3. undertake independent research under supervision;

P4. organise personal learning and development self-critically.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

T1. use constructive criticism to improve and strengthen work;

T2. work independently, demonstrating initiative and the ability to manage time and resources effectively;

T3. apply research skills and practices to offer interpretations of complex and unfamiliar ideas, abstract concepts, political phenomena and events;

T4. summarise academic debates drawn from a range of introductory and specialist research literatures, fluently and with sophistication, to a range of specialist and non-specialist audiences;

T5. evaluate alternative solutions to complex problems.

T6. work with others for collective benefit and knowledge advancement

4. Programme structure

Politics with a Minor

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

4.1

Modules with a total modular weight of 80 must be studied in each Academic Year (Parts A, B and C) from Politics.  Candidates may take 40 credits of minor subject modules in each Part.  Candidates choose modules derived from a list provided by the School of Social Sciences, depending on the candidates' previous qualifications.  Due to timetabling constraints, not all option combinations may be available. 

4.2          Content

(1) Part A – Introductory Modules

Students must be registered for a minimum of 50 credits and a maximum of 70 credits in each Semester

(i)           COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 80 credits)

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Introduction to Academic Studies

1

10

EUA601

The Contemporary World Arena

1

20

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

1

10

EUA610

Conceptions of Democracy

2

10

EUA613

Political Ideologies

2

20

EUA617

International Political Theory

2

10

(ii)          OPTIONAL MODULES – MINOR SUBJECT (total modular weight of 40 credits)

 Candidates should choose two minor subject groups which must be followed through Part A from:

Code

Title

Semester(s)

Modular Weight

Economics

 

 

ECA001

Principles of Macroeconomics

1 & 2

20

English

 

 

EAA777

Narrative Forms and Fiction

1

20

French

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

German

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

Geography

 

 

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

1

10

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

2

10

International Relations

 

 

EUA702

Modern Europe: From the Enlightenment to the Present (10 credit) NB: Or EUA701 if the other minor is History

1

10

EUA621

International Organisations

2

10

Business

 

 

BSA505

Organisational Behaviour

1

10

BSA506

Management of Human Resources

2

10

Mandarin Chinese

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

History

 

 

EUA702

 Modern Europe: From the Enlightenment to the Present (10 credit) NB: Or EUA701 if the other minor is History 

1

10

EUA707

Modern World History: New Perspectives (10 Credit)

2

10

Social Sciences

 

 

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

1

10

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

2

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology & Social Policy A

1

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology & Social Policy B

2

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies: Contemporary Trends and Issues

1

10

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies: Historical Debates and Perspectives

2

10

Spanish

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

(2) Part B – Degree Modules

 EITHER

(a) Standard Route

Students must be registered for a minimum of 50 credits and a maximum of 70 credits in each Semester.

 (i)  COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 40 credits)

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought

1

20

EUB800

Research Design

2

10

(ii)  OPTIONAL MODULES

 POLITICS (total modular weight 40 credits)

In addition to the compulsory modules EUB605, EUB628 and EUB800, candidates must choose a total modular weight of 40 credits over Semesters 1 and 2 from the list below, noting the combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive: 

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB630

British Politics

1

20

EUB632

Third World Politics

1

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics and Society in the 20th Century

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

2

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

2

10

EUB631

Protest and Resistance

2

20

EUB633

Enterprise, Employability and Personal Development

2

10

EUB702

Cold War Europe (20 Credit)

2

20

EUB703

Cold War Europe (10 Credit)

2

10

(iii)  OPTIONAL MODULES – MINOR SUBJECT (total modular weight 40 credits)

Candidates must choose 40 credits from one of the minor subject groups listed below.  Again, the combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive. Candidates studying French, German, Spanish or Mandarin Chinese must study 20 credits from one of the minor subject groups along with 20 credits of their language modules.  Choices of minor subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications.

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB530

Accounting for Business

1

10

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

BSB560

Principles of Marketing

1

10

BSB580

Operations Management

1

10

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

2

10

BSB562

The Marketing Mix

2

10

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

2

10

Economics

 

 

ECB037

Microeconomics

1 & 2

20

English

 

 

EAB008

Victorian Literature

1

20

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Literature

1

20

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

1

20

EAB710

Renaissance Writings

1

20

EAB012

African American Culture

2

20

EAB110

Introduction to Multimodality

2

20

EAB114

Elephants and Engines: An Introduction to Creative Writing

2

20

EAB711

Eighteenth Century Literature

2

20

French

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

German

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

Geography

 

 

GYB210

Globalization

1 & 2

20

GYB220

Geographies of Social Difference

1 & 2

20

GYB211

Globalization

1

10

GYB222

Geographies of Social Difference

1

10

GYB110

Sustainable Urban Geographies

2

10

GYB113

Geographies of Culture, Media and Representation

2

10

GYB320

Global Migration

2

10

History

 

 

EUB706

Twentieth-Century Britain (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB707

Twentieth-Century Britain (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB715

Modern China in a Global Perspective (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB724

Slavery in Global History (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB702

Cold War Europe (20 Credit)

2

20

EUB703

Cold War Europe (10 Credit)

2

10

EUB712

Modern Germany: From Racial Dictatorship to Recivilization (20 Credit)

2

20

EUB713

Modern Germany: From Racial Dictatorship to Recivilization (10 Credit)

2

10

EUB732

Modern Russia from Emancipation to Revolution (20 Credits)

2

20

EUB733

Modern Russia from Emancipation to Revolution (10 Credits)

2

10

International Relations

 

 

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB612

Foreign Policy Analysis

2

20

Mandarin Chinese

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1 & 2

20

Politics

 

 

EUB628

History of Political Thought

1

20

EUB630

British Politics

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics

2

20

EUB631

Protest and Resistance

2

20

Social Sciences

 

 

SSB034

Surveillance Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

SSB023

Religion and Society

2

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

2

10

SSB239

Drugs: Society, Politics and Policy

2

10

Spanish

 

 

Two x 10 credit modules, one from each Semester from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

 

20

OR

(b)  INTERNATIONAL SEMESTER ROUTE

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by the School of Social Sciences, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module.  Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 credits from Semester 1 modules.

 (i) COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 100 credits)

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought

1

20

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 (ii)  OPTIONAL MODULES – MINOR SUBJECT (total modular weight 20 credits)

Candidates must choose 20 credits from one of the minor subject groups listed below.  Candidates studying French, German, Spanish or Mandarin Chinese should choose 10 credits from one of the minor subject groups and one 10 credit Language module. Choices of minor subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications.

Code

Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB530

Accounting for Business

1

10

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

BSB560

Principles of Marketing

1

10

BSB580

Operations Management

1

10

English

 

 

EAB008

Victorian Literature

1

20

EAB039

Nineteenth-Century American Literature

1

20

EAB113

Introduction to Linguistics

1

20

EAB710

Renaissance Writings

1

20

French

 

 

One 10 credit module from Semester 1 from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1

10

German

 

 

One 10 credit module from Semester 1 from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization

1

10

GYB222

Geographies of Social Difference

1

10

History

 

 

EUB706

Twentieth-Century Britain (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB707

Twentieth-Century Britain (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB715

Modern China in a Global Perspective (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB724

Slavery in Global History (20 Credit)

1

20

International Relations

 

 

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

Mandarin Chinese

 

 

One 10 credit module from Semester 1 from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1

10

Politics

 

 

EUB628

History of Political Thought

1

20

EUB630

British Politics

1

20

Social Sciences

 

 

SSB034

Surveillance Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

Spanish

 

 

One 10 credit module from Semester 1 from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications.

1

10

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Politics Module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

 

In addition to the compulsory module EUC800, students must choose a minimum modular weight of 40 Credits and a maximum modular weight of 60 Credits from Group 1 (Optional Politics) modules over Semesters 1 and 2, as well as a minimum modular weight of 20 Credits and a maximum modular weight of 40 Credits from Group 2 (Minor subject) modules.

 

Group 1 – Optional Politics Modules

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence & Terrorism

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

1

20

EUC660

Contemporary Political Philosophy

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

1

20

EUC680

The Populist Challenge to Democracy

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

1

20

EUC666

Gender & Politics

2

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics & Participation in the Digital Age

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

 

Group 2 – Minor Subject Modules

 

Choices of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSC520

Business Systems

1

10

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

1

10

BSC524

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Planning

2

10

BSC575

Leadership & Interpersonal Skills

2

10

Economics

 

 

ECC012

Introduction to Financial Economics

1 & 2

20

ECC013

International Economic Relations

1 & 2

20

ECC014

Economics of the Financial System

1 & 2

20

ECC017

The Economics of Social Issues

2

20

English

 

 

EAC016

Cruel & Unusual: Punishment on trial in American Culture

1

20

EAC440

The Modern Poet

1

20

EAC001

Radicals and Reactionaries: Writing Women in 1890s

2

20

EAC701

Global America

2

20

Geography

 

 

GYC226

Geographies of Work & Life

1

10

GYC309

Feminist Geographies of Home

1

10

GYC107

Regional Worlds

2

20

GYC214

Geographies of Children and Youth

2

10

History

 

 

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

1

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, to be taken in Semesters 1 & 2, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSC024

Gender, Sex & Society

1

20

SSC238

Youth Justice

1

20

SSC212

Poverty, Pay and Living Standards

2

20

SSC357

Producing the News

2

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) Politics and International Relations

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA(Hons)/BA(Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Politics and International Relations
Programme code EUUB10
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 Semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign university.
UCAS code 1L27/7L27
Admissions criteria

BA(Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/1l27

BA(Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/7l27

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

1)   To introduce the concepts and principles that underpin politics and IR informed by research that fosters critical and independent thought, enabling students to engage in politics as citizens and actors in the global political arena.

 

2)   To introduce students to debates about ‘who gets what, when, how and why’ in domestic and international realms and hone their analytic tools to determine the legitimacy of these distributions.

 

3)   To engage students in debates about national and international events , institutions and ideas and the methodological and theoretical assumptions which underpin political arguments .

 

4)   To familiarise students with key concepts in politics and international relations , including power, justice, accountability, order, conflict, cooperation, violence, sovereignty, governance and decision-making.

 

5)   To combine the study of politics and IR with related disciplines in humanities and social sciences and to enable students to extend, apply and/or reflect on their learning through training in the UK or abroad and/or through the study of a modern language.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Benchmarking statements for Politics and International Relations
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School Learning and Teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in the discipline

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

K1. discuss the nature and characteristics of a variety of political and international issues, ideas and phenomena;

K2. analyse the social, economic and historical context in which political systems evolve and operate;

K3. explain competing interpretations of national and international political issues and events;

K4. apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of politics and IR to analyse political ideas, institutions and practices.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1. choose appropriate methods to investigate key issues and events in politics and international relations;

C2. evaluate political opinions, ideas and events and defend personal preferences through reasoned argument;

C3. illustrate analyses of politics and international relations with appropriate evidence and examples;

C4. use argument and analysis to propose solutions to complex problems

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1. use information technology to retrieve information from a variety of primary and secondary sources;

P2. use information technology to communicate ideas orally, visually and in writing;

P3. undertake independent research under supervision;

P4. organise personal learning and development self-critically

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 T1. use constructive criticism to improve and strengthen work;

T2. work independently, demonstrating initiative and the ability to manage time and resources effectively;

T3. comprehend unfamiliar ideas through individual research and effort;

T4. express abstract ideas, political phenomena and events, fluently and with sophistication, to lay and specialist audiences;

T5. evaluate alternative solutions to complex problems;

T6. collaborate with others for collective benefit and knowledge advancement.

4. Programme structure

Politics and International Relations

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

The split of credits between Semesters in this Part will typically be 60:60  

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA601

The Contemporary World Arena

1

20

EUA801

Power, Politics & Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA610

Conceptions of Democracy

2

10

EUA617

International Political Theory

2

10

EUA800

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order

2

20

EUA805

British Politics & Government

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

Students must choose 20 Credits of optional modules from:

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Geography

 

 

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

1

10

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

2

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSA001

Identities & Inequalities

1

10

SSA002

Global, social and Cultural Change

2

10

SSA201

Introducing Criminology

1

10

SSA202

Understanding Social Policy

2

10

 

 

Part B – Degree Modules

 

EITHER

 

(a) Standard Route

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB800

Research Design

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

Students should choose modules in Politics and International Relations with a minimum modular weight of 40 Credits each. Group 1 contains Politics modules and Group 2 contains International Relations Modules. Group 3 modules count as either subject.

 

Students also have the option of selecting 20 Credits from Group 4. Choices of modules from this Group will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Group 1 – Politics

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB637

Political Simulation

2

10

EUB639

From Rebellion to Partition: British India 1857-1947

2

20

SSB352

Political Communication (10 wgt version)

2

10

 

Group 2 – International Relations

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

EUB612

Foreign Policy Analysis (20 Credit)

2

20

EUB621

Foreign Policy Analysis (10 Credit)

2

10

EUB638

The Politics of Star Wars

2

20

 

Group 3 – Politics and International Relations

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

2

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

 

Group 4 – Elective Modules

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

BSB580

Operations Management

2

10

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

2

10

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

2

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

1

10

GYB212

Globalization B

2

10

GYB222

Geographies of Global Difference B

2

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

2

10

 

OR

 

(b) International Semester Route

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by Politics and International Studies, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module. Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 Credits in Semester 1.

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 70 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 50 Credits)

Students should choose modules in Politics and International Relations with a minimum modular weight of 20 Credits each. Group 1 contains Politics modules, and Group 2 contains International Relations modules.  Group 3 modules count as either subject. Students also have the option of selecting 10 Credits from Group 4 - choices of modules from this Group will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Group 1 – Politics

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

 

Group 2 – International Relations

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

 

Group 3 – Politics and International Relations

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

 

Group 4 – Elective Modules

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

1

10

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

 

Students should choose modules in Politics and International Relations with a modular weight of 40 credits each.  Group 1 contains Politics Modules and Group 2 contains International Relations modules.  Group 3 modules count as either subject.

 

Students also have the option of selecting 20 Credits from Group 4. Choices of modules from this Group will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Group 1 - Politics

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC660

Contemporary Political Philosophy

1

20

EUC680

The Populist Challenge to Democracy

1

20

 

Group 2 – International Relations

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC682

International Politics of the Middle East

1

20

EUC688

Critical Security Studies

1

20

 

Group 3 – Politics and International Relations

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence and Terrorism

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

1

20

EUC666

Gender and Politics

2

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics & Participation in the Digital Age

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

 

Group 4

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

1

10

BSC524

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Planning

2

10

BSC575

Leadership & Interpersonal Skills

2

10

Economics

 

 

ECC012

Introduction to Financial Economics

1 & 2

20

Geography

 

 

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

1

10

GYC309

Geographies of Home

1

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSC024

Gender, Sex & Society

1

20

SSC212

Poverty, Pay and Living Standards

2

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) History

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA(Hons)/BA(Hons)+ DPS/DIntS
Programme title History
Programme code EUUB09
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign University.
UCAS code V100/V101
Admissions criteria

BA(Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/v100

BA(Hons)+ DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/v101

 

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

      

·         To equip students with knowledge, understanding and skills in Modern History.

·         To develop an understanding of the value of history both as an area of study and a tool for analysing the contemporary world by fostering critical, creative and independent thinking and a sensitive and disciplined approach to the subject

·         To stimulate students' enthusiasm for history through the deployment of cutting-edge teaching technologies and pedagogies designed to encourage student engagement.

·         To foster, enhance and advance students' personal development through a range of individual and team based learning activities.

·         To develop competence and practical skills which are transferable to a wide range of professions and careers as well as life experiences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmarking Statement – History   
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications  
  • Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services, Careers Education Benchmark Statement
  •  University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

1.    the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader framework of the social sciences and humanities;

2.    the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;

3.    the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of texts, other sources and data;

4.    past societies and historical processes over a chronological and geographical range, encompassing the modern history of Britain, Europe, and the World;

5.    the use of primary evidence in historical argument;

6.    History as an academic discipline, its schools of interpretations, and the variety of methodological approaches and theoretical foundations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

1.    demonstrate knowledge of cultural, political and social difference, through the analysis of the past;

2.    abstract and synthesise information in order to discuss changes in ways of thinking, cultural practices and behaviours over time;

3.    assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments;

4.    critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including texts, oral histories, visual materials other virtual sources and data;

5.    critically assess the construction of history as a political, cultural and social practice;

6.    appreciate the complexities and diversity of past events and mentalities;

7.    show a critical awareness of the problems inherent in historical sources and in interpreting the past.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

1.    locate and retrieve information using a variety of research methods;

2.    select, combine, and interpret different types of source material;

3.    recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries;

4.    deploy bibliographic skills, including accuracy in the citation of sources and the use of proper conventions in the presentation of scholarly work

5.    present cogent and persuasive arguments in oral, written and practical form;

6.    undertake independent learning and research.

c. Key transferable skills:

1. undertake problem-solving and decision-making;

2. develop a reasoned argument;

3. solve problems with imagination and creativity;

4. communicate effectively in speech and writing;

5. work individually and in collaboration with others, demonstrating initiative and self-management;

6. use information and communication technologies for the retrieval and presentation of information.

 

4. Programme structure

History

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

The split of credits between Semesters in this Part will typically be 60:60  

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA705

The Atlantic World: The Americas, Europe and Africa since the 15th Century

1

20

EUA801

Power, Politics & Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA704

What is History?

2

10

EUA711

The Making of Modern Britain

2

20

EUA800

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order

2

20

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

Students must choose 20 Credits of optional modules.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Geography

 

 

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

1

10

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

2

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSA001

Identities & Inequalities

1

10

SSA002

Global, Social and Cultural Change

2

10

SSA201

Introducing Criminology

1

10

SSA202

Understanding Social Policy

2

10

 

 

Part B – Degree Modules

 

EITHER

 

(a) Standard Route

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB735

Understanding History

1

10

EUB800

Research Design

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

In addition to the compulsory modules EUB735 and EUB800, students must choose a minimum modular weight of 80 Credits in Group 1 modules over Semesters 1 and 2, and the remaining 20 Credits may come from Groups 1 or 2. Choices of modules from Group 2 will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Group 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB638

The Politics of Star Wars

2

20

EUB724

Slavery in Global History

2

20

 

Group 2

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

BSB580

Operations Management

2

10

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

2

10

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

2

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

1

10

GYB212

Globalization B

2

10

GYB222

Geographies of Global Difference B

2

10

International Relations

 

 

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB619

Security Studies

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB612

Foreign Policy Analysis (20 Credit)

2

20

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

2

20

 

 

 

 

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

2

10

 

OR

 

(b) International Semester Route

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by Politics and International Studies, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module. Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 Credits in Semester 1.

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 70 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB735

Understanding History

1

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 50 Credits)

In addition to the compulsory modules EUB735, EUB001 and EUB801, students may choose a minimum modular weight of 40 Credits in Group 1 modules in Semester 1, and the remaining 10 Credits from Groups 1 or 2. Choices of modules from Group 2 will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

 

Group 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

1

20

 

Group 2

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

1

10

International Relations

 

 

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit modules, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

In addition to the compulsory module EUC800, candidates must choose a minimum modular weight of 60 Credits from Group 1 modules over Semesters 1 and 2.  The remaining 20 Credits may be chosen from Groups 1 or 2. Choices of modules from Group 2 will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Group 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

1

20

EUC716

Empire, War and Popular Culture in Britain, c.1880-1930

1

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC689

Sex, Death and Decadence: Culture and Politics in the Age of Anxiety

2

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

EUC721

Forgotten Fronts – The Second World War in East Asia

2

20

 

Group 2

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

1

10

BSC524

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Planning

2

10

BSC575

Leadership & Interpersonal Skills

2

10

Economics

 

 

ECC012

Introduction to Financial Economics

1 & 2

20

Geography

 

 

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

1

10

GYC309

Geographies of Home

1

10

International Relations

 

 

EUC688

Critical Security Studies

1

20

EUC666

Gender and Politics

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSC024

Gender, Sex & Society

1

20

SSC212

Poverty, Pay and Living Standards

2

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

 

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) Politics

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA(Hons)/BA(Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Politics
Programme code EUUB11
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign university.
UCAS code L202/L203
Admissions criteria

BA(Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l202

BA(Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l203

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  1. To introduce the concepts and principles that underpin politics, informed by research that fosters critical and independent thought.
  2. To introduce students to debates about power and distribution which lie at the heart of politics (‘who gets what, when, how and why’) and hone the analytic skills required to determine the legitimacy of distributions.
  3. To engage students in debates about political events, institutions and ideas as a route to their engagement in politics as citizens and actors in the global political arena.
  4. To familiarise students with the methodological and theoretical assumptions which underpin political arguments.
  5. To familiarise students with key concepts in critical political analysis, including power, justice, accountability, order, dissent, violence, sovereignty, governance and decision-making.
  6. To combine the study of politics with related disciplines in humanities and social sciences and to enable students to extend, apply and/or reflect on their learning through training in the UK or abroad and/or through the study of a modern language.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Benchmarking statement for Politics and International Relations
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School Learning and Teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in the discipline

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

K1. discuss the nature and characteristics of a variety of political issues, ideas and phenomena;

K2. analyse the social, economic and historical context in which political systems evolve and operate;

K3. explain competing interpretations of political issues and events;

K4. apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of politics to analyse political ideas, institutions and practices;

K5. explain and evaluate concepts of political change such as revolution, war, crisis, protest, agency, and modernity.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

C1. choose appropriate methods in explanatory and normative political theory and political science to investigate key issues and events in politics;

C2. evaluate political opinions, ideas and events and defend personal preferences through reasoned argument;

C3. use supporting evidence and illustrative examples to discuss and/or explain complex political phenomena and events;

C4. use sophisticated argument and analysis to propose solutions to complex problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

P1. use information technology to retrieve information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and to communicate ideas orally, visually and in writing;

P2. evaluate sources and the ethical issues relating to research in politics;

P3. undertake independent research under supervision;

P4. organise personal learning and development self-critically.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

T1. use constructive criticism to improve and strengthen work;

T2. work independently, demonstrating initiative and the ability to manage time and resources effectively;

T3. apply research skills and practices to offer interpretations of complex and unfamiliar ideas, abstract concepts, political phenomena and events;

T4. summarise academic debates drawn from a range of introductory and specialist research literatures, fluently and with sophistication, to a range of specialist and non-specialist audiences;

T5. evaluate alternative solutions to complex problems;

T6. work with others for collective benefit and knowledge advancement.

4. Programme structure

Politics

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

The split of credits between Semesters in this Part will typically be 60:60 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA601

The Contemporary World Arena

1

20

EUA801

Power, Politics & Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA610

Conceptions of Democracy

2

10

EUA617

International Political Theory

2

10

EUA800

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order

2

20

EUA805

British Politics & Government

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Geography

 

 

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

1

10

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

2

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSA001

Identities & Inequalities

1

10

SSA002

Global, social and Cultural Change

2

10

SSA201

Introducing Criminology

1

10

SSA202

Understanding Social Policy

2

10

 

 

Part B – Degree Modules

 

EITHER

 

(a) Standard Route

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB800

Research Design

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (modular weight 100 Credits)

The remaining 100 Credits may be chosen from Groups 1 and 2, of which a maximum of 20 Credits can be from Group 2. Choice of modules from Group 2 will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications. Modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Group 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

2

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB637

Political Simulation

2

10

EUB638

The Politics of Star Wars

2

20

EUB639

From Rebellion to Partition: British India 1857-1947

2

20

SSB352

Political Communication (10 wgt version)

2

10

 

Group 2

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

BSB580

Operations Management

2

10

BSB532

Accounting for Managers

2

10

BSB590

The Contemporary Business Environment

2

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

1

10

GYB212

Globalization B

2

10

GYB222

Geographies of Global Difference B

2

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

2

10

 

OR

 

(b) International Semester Route

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by Politics and International Studies, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module. Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 Credits in Semester 1.

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 70 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 50 Credits)

In addition to the Compulsory Modules EUB605, EUB001 and EUB801, candidates must choose a minimum modular weight of 40 and a maximum modular weight of 50 from Group 1 modules in Semester 1.  If a weight of 40 is chosen from Group 1, candidates should choose a 10 Credit module from Group 2.  Choice of modules from Group 2 will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications. Candidates should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Group 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

1

10

 

Group 2

Choice of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSB555

Organisation Studies

1

10

Geography

 

 

GYB211

Globalization A

1

10

GYB224

Geographies of Global Difference A

1

10

Languages

 

 

One 10-Credit module, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1

10

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSB023

Religion and Society

1

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, offenders and Survivors

1

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

1

10

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

(i) Compulsory Module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

 

Students should choose a minimum modular weight of 60 Credits from Group 1 modules over Semesters 1 and 2.  The remaining credits may be chosen from either Group 1 or Group 2. Choice of modules from Group 2 will be subject to satisfying any pre-requisites set out in individual module specifications.

 

Group 1

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence & Terrorism

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

1

20

EUC660

Contemporary Political Philosophy

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

1

20

EUC680

The Populist Challenge to Democracy

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

1

20

EUC666

Gender & Politics

2

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics & Participation in the Digital Age

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

 

Group 2

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

Business

 

 

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

1

10

BSC524

Entrepreneurship & Small Business Planning

2

10

BSC575

Leadership & Interpersonal Skills

2

10

Economics

 

 

ECC012

Introduction to Financial Economics

1 & 2

20

Geography

 

 

GYC226

Geographies of Work and Life

1

10

GYC309

Geographies of Home

1

10

History

 

 

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

1

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

2

20

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

Social & Policy Studies

 

 

SSC024

Gender, Sex & Society

1

20

SSC212

Poverty, Pay and Living Standards

2

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) Politics, History and International Relations

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DIntS/DPS
Programme title Politics, History and International Relations
Programme code EUUB12
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign university.
UCAS code LV21/LV22
Admissions criteria

BA (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/lv21

BA (Hons) + DIntS/DPS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/lv22

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  1. To provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment within which they can develop knowledge, understanding and skills in Politics, History and International Relations.
  2. To encourage a sense of enthusiasm for Politics, History and International Relations; to foster critical, creative and independent thinking; and to develop a sensitive and disciplined approach.
  3. To stimulate productive reflection on the similarities and differences between modes of study in each subject.
  4. To develop competence and practical skills which are transferable to a wide range of professions and employment as well as life experiences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Benchmarking statement for Politics and International Relations
  • QAA Benchmarking statement for History
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School Learning and Teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in the subject

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

K1. discuss the nature and characteristics of a variety of political, historical and international issues, ideas and phenomena;

K2. analyse the social, economic and historical context in which political systems evolve and operate;

K3. explain competing interpretations of political, historical and international issues and events;

K4. apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of politics, history and international relations to analyse ideas, institutions and practices;

K5. use primary evidence in historical argument.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

C1. choose appropriate methods to investigate key issues and events in politics, history and international relations;

C2. evaluate political opinions, ideas and events and defend personal preferences through reasoned argument;

C3. use supporting evidence and illustrative examples to discuss and/or explain complex political, historical and international phenomena and events;

C4. use sophisticated argument and analysis to propose solutions to complex problems;

C5. recognise the complexities and diversity of past events and mentalities;

C6. discuss the problems inherent in historical sources and in interpreting the past.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

P1. use information technology to retrieve information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and to communicate ideas orally, visually and in writing;

P2. evaluate sources and the ethical issues relating to research in politics, history and international relations;

P3. undertake independent research under supervision;

P4. organise personal learning and development self-critically.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

T1. use constructive criticism to improve and strengthen work;

T2. work independently, demonstrating initiative and the ability to manage time and resources effectively;

T3. apply research skills and practices to offer interpretations of complex and unfamiliar ideas, abstract concepts, phenomena and events in politics, history and international relations;

T4. summarise academic debates drawn from a range of introductory and specialist research literatures, fluently and with sophistication, to a range of specialist and non-specialist audiences;

T5. evaluate alternative solutions to complex problems;

T6. work with others for collective benefit and knowledge advancement.

4. Programme structure

Politics, History and International Relations

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

 

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 120 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA601

The Contemporary World Arena

1

20

EUA705

The Atlantic World: The Americas, Europe and Africa since the 15th Century

1

20

EUA801

Power, Politics & Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA617

International Political Theory

2

10

EUA704

What is History?

2

10

EUA800

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order

2

20

EUA805

British Politics & Government

2

10

 

Part B – Degree Modules

 

EITHER

 

(a) Standard Route

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Subject

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

Politics or IR

1

10

EUB800

Research Design

Politics or History or IR

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 100 Credits)

Students should choose modules in Politics, History and International Relations (some modules count as more than one subject), totalling 40 Credits in each subject (including compulsory modules). Students should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Subject

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

Politics or IR

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

Politics

1

20

EUB619

Security Studies

IR

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

Politics

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

Politics or IR

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

Politics

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

Politics

1

10

EUB735

Understanding History

History

1

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective

History

1

20

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

History

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

Politics or History or IR

1

20

EUB612

Foreign Policy Analysis (20 Credit)

IR

2

20

EUB621

Foreign Policy Analysis (10 Credit)

IR

2

10

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

Politics or IR

2

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

Politics or History or IR

2

20

EUB637

Political Simulation

Politics or IR

2

10

EUB638

Politics of Star Wars

Politics or IR

2

20

EUB639

From Rebellion to Partition: British India, 1857-1947

Politics or History

2

20

EUB724

Slavery in Global History

History

2

20

SSB352

Political Communication

Politics or IR

2

10

 

OR

 

(b) International Semester Route

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester 2 with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester 2, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 50 credits, as required by Politics and International Studies, along with a Distance Learning Research Design module. Candidates who opt for this route must ensure that they have selected a total of 60 Credits in Semester 1, including compulsory module EUB605 (which may count as either Politics or IR – see ‘subject’ column below) and the remaining credits made up of optional modules so that overall 20 Credits come from Politics, 20 Credits from History and 20 Credits from International Relations.  Candidates should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 70 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB001

International Semester

2

50

EUB801

Research Design (Distance Learning)

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 50 Credits)

Students should choose modules in Politics, History and International Relations (some modules count as more than one subject). A minimum of 10 Credits and a maximum of 20 Credits should be chosen in each subject. Students should note that combinations of modules of the same titles but with different credit-weightings are mutually exclusive.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Subject

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

Politics or IR

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

Politics

1

20

EUB619

Security Studies

IR

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

Politics

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

Politics or IR

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought (20 Credit)

Politics

1

20

EUB629

History of Political Thought (10 Credit)

Politics

1

10

EUB735

Understanding History

History

1

10

EUB728

Victorian Values Reconsidered

History

1

20

EUB802

Small Wars

Politics or History or IR

1

20

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI.

 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

 

 

Part C – Degree Modules

Students must take a minimum of 20 Credits of Politics, 20 Credits of History and 20 Credits of International Relations. In choosing optional subjects, students must ensure that they study a minimum of 50 Credits and a maximum of 70 Credits in each Semester. Credits from the Dissertation module must be split equally (20:20) across both Semesters.

 

(i) Compulsory module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

 

Module Code

Module Title

Subject

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence and Terrorism

Politics or IR

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

IR

1

20

EUC660

Contemporary Political Philosophy

Politics

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

Politics or IR

1

20

EUC680

The Populist Challenge to Democracy

Politics

1

20

EUC682

International Politics of the Middle East

IR

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

IR

1

20

EUC688

Critical Security Studies

Politics or IR

1

20

EUC703

Revolution in the Head: The Beatles and Sixties Britain

History

1

20

EUC713

Jim Crow, Bootleggers and Okies: American Cultural History 1890-1930

History

1

20

EUC716

Empire, War and Popular Culture in Britain, c.1880-1930

History

1

20

EUC666

Gender and Politics

Politics or IR

2

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

History or IR

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics and Participation in the Digital Age

Politics or IR

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

Politics or IR

2

20

EUC689

Sex, Death and Decadence: Culture and Politics in the Age of Anxiety

History

2

20

EUC719

Convicts and Kangaroos: Australia 1788-1868

History

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

History or Politics or IR

2

20

EUC721

Forgotten Fronts – The Second World War in East Asia

History

2

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) Politics with Economics

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DPS/BA (Hons) + DIntS
Programme title Politics with Economics
Programme code EUUB16
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign University.
UCAS code L2L1, L2LA
Admissions criteria

BA (Hons) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l2l1

BA (Hons) + DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l2la

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  1. To introduce the concepts and principles that underpin politics, informed by research that fosters critical and independent thought.
  2. To introduce students to debates about power and distribution which lie at the heart of politics (‘who gets what, when, how and why’) and hone the analytic skills required to determine the legitimacy of distributions.
  3. To engage students in debates about political events, institutions and ideas as a route to their engagement in politics as citizens and actors in the global political arena.
  4. To familiarise students with the methodological and theoretical assumptions which underpin political arguments.
  5. To familiarise students with key concepts in critical political analysis, including power, justice, accountability, order, dissent, violence, sovereignty, governance and decision-making.
  6. To familiarise students with a selection of concepts and examples in economics.
  7. To enable students to extend, apply and/or reflect on their learning through training in the UK or abroad and/or through the study of a modern language.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Benchmarking statement for Politics and International Relations
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School Learning and Teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in the discipline

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

K1. discuss the nature and characteristics of a variety of political issues, ideas and phenomena;

K2. analyse the social, economic and historical context in which political systems evolve and operate;

K3. explain competing interpretations of political issues and events;

K4. apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of politics to analyse political ideas, institutions and practices;

K5. explain and evaluate concepts of political change such as revolution, war, crisis, protest, agency, and modernity;

K6. discuss key concepts and examples from economics.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

C1. choose appropriate methods in explanatory and normative political theory and political science to investigate key issues and events in politics;

C2. evaluate political opinions, ideas and events and defend personal preferences through reasoned argument;

C3. use supporting evidence and illustrative examples to discuss and/or explain complex phenomena and events in politics and economics;

C4. use sophisticated argument and analysis to propose solutions to complex problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

P1. use information technology to retrieve information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and to communicate ideas orally, visually and in writing;

P2. evaluate sources and the ethical issues relating to research in politics and economics;

P3. undertake independent research under supervision;

P4. organise personal learning and development self-critically.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

T1. use constructive criticism to improve and strengthen work;

T2. work independently, demonstrating initiative and the ability to manage time and resources effectively;

T3. apply research skills and practices to offer interpretations of complex and unfamiliar ideas, abstract concepts, political phenomena and events;

T4. summarise academic debates drawn from a range of introductory and specialist research literatures, fluently and with sophistication, to a range of specialist and non-specialist audiences;

T5. evaluate alternative solutions to complex problems.

T6. work with others for collective benefit and knowledge advancement

4. Programme structure

Politics with Economics

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A – Introductory Modules

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 120 Credits)

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

1

10

EUA601

The Contemporary World Arena

1

20

EUA801

Power, Politics & Ideology in Modern Europe

1

20

EUA610

Conceptions of Democracy

2

10

EUA803

The Making and Unmaking of the World Order

2

10

EUA805

British Politics and Government

2

10

ECA501

Introductory Macroeconomics

1 & 2

20

ECA502

Introductory Microeconomics

1 & 2

20

  

Part B – Degree Modules

(i) Compulsory Modules (total modular weight 20 Credits) 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB605

Theories and Methods in Political Research

1

10

EUB800

Research Design

2

10

 

(ii) Optional Modules – Politics and Languages (total modular weight 60 Credits) 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUB601

The European Union (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB604

Comparative European Politics (20 Credit)

1

20

EUB620

Comparative European Politics (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB625

The European Union (10 Credit)

1

10

EUB628

History of Political Thought

1

20

EUB632

Politics of Developing Countries

2

20

EUB634

The American Century: US Politics & Society in the 20th Century

2

20

EUB637

Political Simulation

2

10

EUB638

The Politics of Star Wars

2

20

EUB639

From Rebellion to Partition: British India, 1857-1947

2

20

SSB352

Political Communication (10 wgt version)

2

10

Languages

 

 

One or two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

10/20

 

(iii) Optional Modules – Economics (total modular weight 40 Credits)

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

ECB004

Introduction to Financial Economics

1 & 2

20

ECB005

International Economic Relations

1 & 2

20

ECB015

Economics of the Financial System

1 & 2

20

ECB016

History of Economic Thought

1 & 2

20

ECB136

Transport Economics

1

20

ECB035

The Economics of Social Issues

2

20

ECB039

Economics of Business Strategy

2

20

 

Part I

Candidates will undertake one of the following approved study and/or work placements leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) or Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Regulation XI. 

Code

 Title

EUI003

Diploma in Professional Studies (work placement)

EUI004

Diploma in International Studies (study abroad)

LAN900

Diploma in International Studies (overseas work placement in a foreign language)

GYI100

Year in Enterprise (DPS)

GYI200

Professional Training Placement & Overseas Study (DIntS)

  

Part C – Degree Modules

(i) Compulsory Module (total modular weight 40 Credits)

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC800

Dissertation

1 & 2

40

 

(ii) Optional Modules (total modular weight 80 Credits)

Students should choose a total of 80 Credits from the following:

(a) Politics & Languages Modules – total modular weight 40 Credits

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

EUC604

State, Violence & Terrorism

1

20

EUC628

The Asia-Pacific in Global Politics

1

20

EUC660

Contemporary Political Philosophy

1

20

EUC677

Britain and the European Union

1

20

EUC680

The Populist Challenge to Democracy

1

20

EUC686

International Conflict Management

1

20

EUC666

Gender & Politics

2

20

EUC684

War in the 21st Century

2

20

EUC685

Power, Politics & Participation in the Digital Age

2

20

EUC687

The Politics of Militarism

2

20

EUC720

After Empire: South Asia since 1945

2

20

Languages

 

 

Two 10-Credit modules, one from each semester, from a list supplied by the Language Centre, levels dependent on candidates’ previous qualifications. Languages offered are: French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

1 & 2

20

 

(b) Economics Modules - total modular weight 40 Credits

Students should note that Part B modules of the same titles but different Module Codes are mutually exclusive.

 

Module Code

Module Title

Semester

Modular Weight

ECC012

Introduction to Financial Economics

1 & 2

20

ECC013

International Economic Relations

1 & 2

20

ECC014

Economics of the Financial System

1 & 2

20

ECC019

Transport Economics

1

20

ECC017

The Economics of Social Issues

2

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

5.2 Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University's special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

EU BA (Hons) Politics with Business Studies (entry prior to 2018)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA (Hons)/BA (Hons) + DPS/BA (Hons) + DIntS
Programme title Politics with Business Studies
Programme code Politics with Business Studies (EUUB14)
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either 6 semesters (three-year programme), or 8 semesters (four-year programme, including a placement year). The three-year programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two), for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign University.
UCAS code Politics with Business Studies (L2N1, L2N2)
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/phir/undergraduate/politics/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  1. To introduce the concepts and principles that underpin politics, informed by research that fosters critical and independent thought.
  2. To introduce students to debates about power and distribution which lie at the heart of politics (‘who gets what, when, how and why’) and hone the analytic skills required to determine the legitimacy of distributions.
  3. To engage students in debates about political events, institutions and ideas as a route to their engagement in politics as citizens and actors in the global political arena.
  4. To familiarise students with the methodological and theoretical assumptions which underpin political arguments.
  5. To familiarise students with key concepts in critical political analysis, including power, justice, accountability, order, dissent, violence, sovereignty, governance and decision-making.
  6. To familiarise students with a selection of concepts and examples in a cognate discipline.
  7. To enable students to extend, apply and/or reflect on their learning through training in the UK or abroad and/or through the study of a modern language.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Benchmarking statement for Politics and International Relations
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • School Learning and Teaching policies
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in the discipline

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

K1. discuss the nature and characteristics of a variety of political issues, ideas and phenomena;

K2. analyse the social, economic and historical context in which political systems evolve and operate;

K3. explain competing interpretations of political issues and events;

K4. apply concepts, theories and methods used in the study of politics to analyse political ideas, institutions and practices;

K5. explain and evaluate concepts of political change such as revolution, war, crisis, protest, agency, and modernity;

K6. discuss key concepts and examples from a cognate discipline.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

C1. choose appropriate methods in explanatory and normative political theory and political science to investigate key issues and events in politics;

C2. evaluate political opinions, ideas and events and defend personal preferences through reasoned argument;

C3. use supporting evidence and illustrative examples to discuss and/or explain complex phenomena and events in politics and a cognate discipline;

C4. use sophisticated argument and analysis to propose solutions to complex problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

P1. use information technology to retrieve information from a variety of primary and secondary sources and to communicate ideas orally, visually and in writing;

P2. evaluate sources and the ethical issues relating to research in politics and a cognate discipline;

P3. undertake independent research under supervision;

P4. organise personal learning and development self-critically.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students will be able to:

T1. use constructive criticism to improve and strengthen work;

T2. work independently, demonstrating initiative and the ability to manage time and resources effectively;

T3. apply research skills and practices to offer interpretations of complex and unfamiliar ideas, abstract concepts, political phenomena and events;

T4. summarise academic debates drawn from a range of introductory and specialist research literatures, fluently and with sophistication, to a range of specialist and non-specialist audiences;

T5. evaluate alternative solutions to complex problems.

T6. work with others for collective benefit and knowledge advancement

4. Programme structure

Politics with Business

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits with a minimum modular weight of 50 credits in each Semester, taking into account compulsory, optional and elective modules.

 

In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

 

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once.  Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

4.1 Notes

Students must be registered for a minimum of 50 credits and a maximum of 70 credits in any one Semester.

4.2 Content

Part A – Introductory Modules 

(i)           COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 80 credits)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

Semester

EUA001

Smart Scholarship

10

1

EUA601

Contemporary World Arena

20

1

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

1

EUA610

Conceptions of Democracy

10

2

EUA613

Political Ideologies

20

2

EUA617

International Political Theory

10

2

(ii)          MINOR SUBJECT MODULES (total modular weight 20 credits)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

Semester

Business Studies

 

 

 

BSA505

Organisational Behaviour

10

1

BSA506

Management of Human Resources

10

2

(iii)         ELECTIVE MODULES (total modular weight 20 credits)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

Semester

Criminology

 

 

 

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A

10

1

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B

10

2

Geography

 

 

 

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

1

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

2

History

 

 

 

EUA702

Modern Europe

10

1

EUA707

Modern World History: New Perspectives

10

2

International Relations

 

 

 

EUA701

Modern Europe

20

1

EUA621

International Organisations

10

2

Media Studies

 

 

 

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies: Contemporary Trends and Issues

10

1

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies: Historical Debates and Perspectives

10

2

Sociology

 

 

 

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

1

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

2

 The following are available as 20-credit electives only:

<

Code

Title

Modular Weight

Semester

Economics

 

 

 

ECA001

Principles of Macroeconomics

20

1 & 2

ECA002

Principles of Microeconomics

20

1 & 2