Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

CV Curriculum-based component of EngD Research Programme in Innovative and Collaborative Engineering

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXVI and Reg. XXI (Regs for Higher Degrees by Research and Regs for Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award Doctor of Engineering (EngD); Exit routes: MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert
Programme title Engineering Doctorate
Programme code CVRE11/CVRE12
Length of programme 4 years, full time
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/research/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

1.1 EngD Programme Aims 

The primary aim of the EngD is to develop engineers who are capable of demonstrating innovation in the application of knowledge to the engineering sector.   The aims of the programme are to: 

  • Provide a programme that both promotes and facilitates the exchange of ideas, knowledge, experience, and skills for Research Engineers, companies and academics.
  • Stimulate and deliver research and innovation with a strong business industry-based focus, whilst contributing to the body of knowledge in a particular industrial sector or multidisciplinary theme.
  • Produce high calibre doctoral graduates with a strong level of technical, managerial and business competence who can drive industry innovation and UK business competitiveness. 

1.2 Core (60 Credits) Taught Programme Aims

  • Provide Research Engineers with the necessary experience and knowledge to undertake rigorous, leading edge industry-based research.
  • Facilitate knowledge acquisition of a range of research methodologies to deliver business sector specific research and innovation.
  • Equip students with the necessary training and skills to undertake a study of a real life problem within an industrial context.
  • Enable candidates to acquire a wide range of transferable management and professional development skills within engineering and construction. 

1.3 Additional (120 Credit) Taught Programme Aims

  • Provide Research Engineers with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying a complex problem in a specialised area relating to their degree.
  • Acquire the capabilities and professionalism to deliver novel research in one of the five research areas: sustainable design and construction; construction technologies and business processes; information and communication technologies; or, transport and infrastructure.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The Research Engineer (RE) should be capable of applying the knowledge and expertise acquired in a business environment in a disciplined, innovative and penetrating way.  This is seen as an important element in the achievement of competitiveness of engineering businesses.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

The programme aims to develop and test the students in a range of competencies as listed below:

  • Development of innovative thinking, while tackling real industrial problems.
  • Continual broadening, by gaining and applying new knowledge from a modular taught programme.
  • Expert knowledge of an engineering/applied science area.
  • The ability to apply his/her skills and knowledge to new and unusual situations.
  • The ability to seek optimal, viable solutions to multi-faceted engineering problems and to search out relevant information sources.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate:

  • Research and innovation skills within an engineering context.
  • Project and programme management skills.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate:

  • Expert knowledge of an engineering area.
  • Appreciation of industrial research and development culture.
  • Programme and project management skills against realistic timescales.
  • Financial project planning and control.
  • Teamwork and leadership skills.
  • Communication – oral and written, technical and non-technical.
  • Technical organisational skills.
  • The ability to apply skills and knowledge to new and unusual situations.
  • The ability to seek optimal, viable solutions to multi-faceted engineering problems and to search out relevant information sources.

4. Programme structure

All Research Engineers who are registered on the Engineering Doctorate (EngD) programme at CICE are required to register for and satisfy the requirements for the curriculum-based component of the programme.  The purpose of the taught modules is to develop knowledge and understanding of a number of business and technical subjects.

The curriculum-based component of the programme requires a minimum modular weight of 60 and a maximum of 180 credits to be taken.  Permission from the Programme Director should be sought by students wishing to take the 60 credits route.  Credit must be achieved in all modules to enable progression on the programme.  The curriculum-based component of the EngD programme must be completed within the first two years of the EngD programme.

All candidates shall register at the beginning of their programme and subsequently at the beginning of each academic year for the modules which they are taking in that year, subject to their satisfactory progress in research and the extension of their registration for the Degree of EngD in accordance with paragraph 4.4 of the Regulations for Higher Degrees by Research.  Candidates are not eligible to register for modules whilst they remain in debt to the University.

The Degree of Master of Science, the PGDip and the PGCert shall be awarded as an exit route only.

The programme is split into a taught and research element.  The taught element is undertaken in the first two years.  Thus through teaching in lectures, tutorials and workshops.  Coursework and examinations are used for assessment.

The research is undertaken over the whole 4 years but mainly in the last two years of the programme.  The Research Engineers must submit an EngD Thesis which consists of a discourse and published papers at the end of their study.  They are examined via a Viva.

The taught component is assessed and forms an integral part of the degree.  Participants will be expected to attend the University to take these modules which are mainly based on the School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering’s Masters Degree Programmes.  REs have the option to take a limited set of modules from other Schools in the University.

For the degree of EngD the basis of assessment, following satisfactory completion of the curriculum-based element, shall be one of the following:

1)       a collection of published papers and a discourse of no more than 20,000 words setting out the aims, objectives, findings and industrial relevance/impact of the research work undertaken. The submission shall include a minimum of 3 published (peer reviewed) papers or papers accepted for publication, of which at least one should be in an appropriate engineering journal.

2)       Where the nature of the research programme made the production of publications unlikely, technical reports should be included in lieu of published papers. Such technical reports shall have been subject to external assessment. The reports shall be accompanied by a discourse of no more than 20,000 words setting out the aims, objectives, findings and industrial/relevance impact of the research work undertaken.

 

4.1  Students registered from October 2010 onwards

Year 1

Compulsory modules

Code Module Title Modular Weight Semester
CVP319 Research Methods 15 1
CVP038 EngD Short Project 15 2
CVP034 Management & Professional Development 1  15 1&2

 

Optional modules

One 15 credit module selected in each semester from any suitable postgraduate module offered in the School or University.

 

Year 2

Compulsory modules

Code Module Title Modular Weight Semester
CVP015 Research Dissertation 90 1&2
CVP035 Management & Professional Development 2  15 1&2

 

For students who do not complete the EngD programme, an exit award of MSc Construction Innovation and Management (CVPT38) may be applicable.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI and Regulation XXVI. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MRes Built Environment: Energy Demand Studies

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award MRes, PG Cert
Programme title Built Environment: Energy Demand Studies
Programme code CVPT10
Length of programme Minimum of 1 year (full-time) and a maximum of 3 years (full-time)
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

MRes - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT10

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • Provide a solid grounding in knowledge, understanding and research methods of the interdisciplinary field of energy demand reduction in the built environment.
  • Establish understanding of the UK energy landscape and how energy and climate change challenges are interlinked through technical, environmental and behavioural factors.
  • Provide the skills necessary to support research practice, critical assessment, and the use of evidence on technical, environmental, social and economic factors influencing energy demand in buildings and building stocks.
  • To develop students’ transferable skills enabling them to successfully manage, communicate, and lead complex research projects.
  • Provide real experience of research through the generation, development and implementation of a significant research-based dissertation.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The following are pertinent:

  • QAA Benchmark statements for engineering.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
  • Loughborough University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • EPSRC Energy Programme objectives of expanding research capacity in energy-related areas and to address perceived weakness in postdoctoral training in energy demand (EPSRC, Energy Landscape documentation, January 2009)
  • University definition of MRes, Learning and Teaching Committee, PDQ Team, Nov. 2005.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Energy demand and its historical, technical, social, economic and policy context.
  • Future energy pathways.
  • The UK energy supply system, including fossil fuels, electricity, renewables and nuclear.
  • Methods for building energy modelling.
  • Energy services systems in buildings and low energy building design.
  • Quantitative and qualitative measurement and survey methods.
  • Calibration, data gathering and sampling.
  • Data analysis and representation.
  • The social environment and its effects on energy demand attitudes and behaviours.
  • Energy economics and energy policy.
  • The design of a research project to explore a defined research question.
  • The energy and buildings research landscape and the state of the art of the chosen field of research.
  • The principles of project management.
  • Presentation of research findings in diverse ways appropriate to different audiences.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should have the ability to:

  • Critically review literature and place research in context.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking and critically the ability to define and address complex problems.
  • Analyse and interpret evidence and data.
  • Critically discuss energy policy and its links to science and engineering.
  • Develop a method to collect data and produce results relevant to the solution of a defined problem.
  • Evaluate results, draw conclusions and make recommendations.
  • Construct research questions and formulate hypotheses, aims and objectives.
  • Employ appropriate data analysis and presentation tools to convey meaning clearly.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

Students acquire subject-specific skills in a number of areas but in the context of this MRes, students will be challenged to go beyond the analysis of a set problem and be required to apply the computer methods and laboratory and field monitoring skills to more open ended problems.  As researchers they will be expected to have an ability to clarify the research question, to plan their ‘experimental’ approach and to implement that plan effectively to solve more open ended problems.

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Develop a research strategy.
  • Use a range of modelling and analysis techniques.
  • Communicate complex information in oral and written forms using appropriate tools.
  • Develop a research dissertation proposal and plan and execute a research project.
  • Conduct a literature review.
  • Collect data through laboratory experiments, field work or desk-based studies and perform appropriate analysis.
  • Select and use quantitative and qualitative research methods.
c. Key transferable skills:

 

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.
  • Understand research methodologies and their application to specific research problems.
  • Interact professionally with others to achieve a common goal.
  • Understand organisational structures and frameworks.
  • Manage personal time.
  • Plan personal professional development.
  • Demonstrate awareness of research ethics, issues of confidentiality and data protection, intellectual property and copyright.

 

4. Programme structure

All students will study 6 modules of 15 credits and undertake a research project leading to a dissertation. There will be a compulsory intensive block week module at  the start of Semester 1 and thereafter a further three modules will be taken in Semester 1 and a further two compulsory modules in Semester 2.  All modules are compulsory. 

 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester 1

CVP314

Energy Demand in Context

15

CVP315

Building Energy Systems and Models

15

CVP316

Energy Theory, Measurement and Interpretation

15

CVP351

Research Development and Dissemination 

15

Semester 2

CVP317

Energy Demand: Society Economics and Policy

15

CVP350

Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods

15

Semesters 1 & 2

CVP318

Energy Demand Studies: Research Dissertation

90

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Construction Project Management/ MSc Construction Management

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB)

Final award MSc/PG Dip/PG Cert
Programme title Construction Project Management/ Construction Management
Programme code CVPT30/29, CVPT31/40
Length of programme Minimum of 1 year (full time) and a maximum of 5 years (part time)
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

Full Time MSc Construction Project Management - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT30

Part Time MSc Construction Project Management - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT29

Full Time MSc Construction Management - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT31

Part Time MSc Construction Management - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT40

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The two construction programmes aim at ensuring that as a student you will: 

  • Acquire a high quality educational experience that develops and sustains your knowledge, skills and aspirations in the further advancement of your career within the construction industry;
  • Engage with other students within a multi-national environment in which to discuss and debate current essential issues that relate to design, construction and project management;
  • Gain an appreciation and understanding of all aspects of managing the life cycle and the successful realisation of a construction project; and
  • Achieve an excellent combination of technical and managerial knowledge in key subjects desired by most employers in the construction sector. 

 In addition, the specific aims for each of the programmes are to ensure that as a current or future construction professional: 

MSc Construction Project Management

  • You achieve the capabilities and professionalism expected of project managers by developing a more holistic appreciation of construction project processes; and
  • Acquire an innovative and forward-looking view of managing construction projects through the Loughborough way. 

MSc Construction Management

  • You graduate with a range of essential management skills suitable for running construction projects and business organisations.
  • You develop competence in creative problem solving.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The MSc programmes are intended for students who have prior knowledge of the construction industry at honours degree level (or equivalent international degree qualification) or from a recognised UK professional body.  Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

External References

  • The programmes outcomes have been formulated with reference to the QAA benchmark statements in Construction, Property and Surveying (2008) and Master’s degrees in Business and Management (2007);
  • The MSc Construction Project Management and Construction Management programmes are accredited by the RICS/University Partnership Scheme for which they must meet quality thresholds as identified in the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence in Project Management (2006) and Quantity Surveying and Construction |2008).  For continued accreditation the RICS also requires statements relating to the Research Excellence Framework, the Teaching Excellence Framework and graduate employment. 
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (2008)

Internal References

  • The University’s Learning and Teaching Strategy;
  • The School’s Postgraduate Learning and Teaching policies; and
  • The research interests and specialist expertise of the contributing teaching staff and their professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • Contemporary issues facing the construction industry and the drivers for change;
  • The linkages and interdisciplinary relationships between different construction professionals;
  • Data collection, analysis and reporting of results;
  • A critical evaluation of methodologies to solve construction problems;
  • A comprehensive understanding of management principles and theory; and
  • Management responsibility for running construction projects and organisations. 

Knowledge and understanding associated with particular degree paths (depending on module selection): 

MSc Construction Project Management

  • The principles of the design process, techniques used to manage construction projects and programmes as well as controlling design costs;
  • Sustainability issues as they relate to the built environment; and
  • Contemporary construction innovation and risk management. 

MSc Construction Management

  • The principles of, and techniques for managing functional activities in construction organisations and the delivery of projects;
  • Principles of managing project oriented organisations 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programmes, students should be able to:

  • Apply relevant techniques to produce solutions to problems;
  • Evaluate data based on its importance and relevance;
  • Be able to advise on design, procurement and construction options;
  • Be able to provide legal, financial, human resource advice on construction projects; and
  • Develop and critically evaluate solutions to routine and unfamiliar problems.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  • Use management skills to deliver effective solutions;
  • Develop a structured approach to problem solving;
  • Use a range of decision support tools to provide project and business solutions; and
  • Competently defend, with evidence, a chosen solution.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of these programmes, students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively using a variety of media;
  • Collate and critically review data and present findings;
  • Work effectively as a team member to achieve goals;
  • Participate in interactive sessions;
  • Interact and liaise effectively with staff, colleagues and industrial contacts; and
  • Effectively manage own time within a team environment.

 

4. Programme structure

NOTE: Not all optional modules will be available in each academic year.

 

4.1 Semester 1

FOR BOTH PROGRAMMES

Compulsory Modules

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP320

Principles and Application of BIM

15

CVP322

Principles of Design and Construction

15

CVP323

Principles of Project Management

15

 

4.2 Semester 2

MSc Construction Project Management (full-time and part-time)

Compulsory Modules

 Code

 Module Title

 Modular Weight

 CVP324

 Design Management

 15

 CVP325

 Sustainability and the Built Environment

 15

 CVP326

 Management of Construction Processes and  Techniques

 15

 

Option Modules

One module from

 Code

 Module Title

 Modular Weight

 CVP328

 Strategic Management in Construction

 15

 CVP329

 People and Teams

 15

 CVP330

 Construction Law and Contract Management

 15

 CVP334 *

 AEC Global Integrated Design Delivery

15

 CVP335

 Federated Building Information Modelling

 15

 

 

MSc Construction Management (full-time and part-time)

Option Modules

Group 1 options – two modules from

 Code

 Module Title

 Modular Weight

 CVP324

 Design Management

 15

 CVP325

 Sustainability and the Built Environment

 15

 CVP326

 Management of Construction Processes and  Techniques

 15

 CVP335

 Federated Building Information Modelling

 15

 

 Group 2 options – two modules from

 Code

 Module Title

 Modular Weight

 CVP328

 Strategic Management in Construction

 15

 CVP329

 People and Teams

 15

 CVP330

 Construction Law and Contract Management

 15

 CVP334 *

 AEC Global Integrated Design Delivery

 15

 

* Part-time students may only take module CVP334 with prior agreement from the Programme Director.

 

4.3  Semesters 1 and 2 and Summer Period 

FOR BOTH PROGRAMMES

Compulsory Module 

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

CVP332

Research Dissertation

60

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Water and Environmental Management (Distance Learning)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate are accredited by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) for student intakes in academic years up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.

The MSc is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), for student  intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title Water and Environmental Management (Distance Learning)
Programme code CVPT78
Length of programme MSc: 2-8 years, Diploma: 1-5 years, Certificate: 1-3 years. Delivered by Distance Learning (largely paper-based).
Participants have the option of two start dates: Mid-January and Mid-July.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

MSc Water and Environmental Management (Distance Learning) - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT78

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is likely to be of particular interest to applicants who wish to develop careers in planning and managing work in the water and sanitation sector in low- and middle-income countries.  It aims to:

  • Provide graduates with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively plan, manage and coordinate water, sanitation and environmental services in low- and middle-income countries;
  • Develop participants’ understanding of the principles and practice of sustainable water and environmental management for the public good;
  • Equip students with appropriate expertise and skills for work in low- and middle-income countries; and
  • Provide an opportunity for specialisation in one topic through in depth study during the Research Dissertation module.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

This programme is taught by the Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC) in the School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering at Loughborough University. The WEDC Mission Statement is:

Education, training, research and consultancy for improved planning, provision and management of physical infrastructure and services for development in low- and middle-income countries, focusing on the needs and demands of the poor.

This specification has taken into account the descriptors for a qualification at Masters (MSc), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) levels that are set out in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. 

WEDC’s postgraduate programmes are multidisciplinary in content so no single-subject benchmarks are wholly applicable to them. There are currently no benchmark statements for Engineering MSc programmes. Although the Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering applies to first degrees in engineering, and not to postgraduate degrees, it has been used to inform the drafting of intended learning outcomes for this programme, with the expectation that postgraduate students attain a higher level than undergraduate students in relevant outcomes. The Subject Benchmark Statement for Master’s Awards in Business and Management has also been consulted because of the management content of the WEDC programmes; the list of skills for all Master’s programmes listed in Appendix 2 is of particular relevance.  Note has also been taken of the Engineering Council document The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (published May 2014) for Master Degrees other than the Integrated Masters (MEng) (Accredited as further learning to masters level, partially meeting the educational requirements for CEng).

Following an accreditation visit by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) in June 2016, the panel recommended that this programme at MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate levels be accredited for student intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  Accreditation recognises that this programme contributes to the academic requirements for CIWEM membership.

Following an accreditation visit in October 2015, the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) accredited the MSc level of this programme as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree.  This applies for intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

Sections 3.1 and 3.2 relate to the outcomes from study for the Master of Science (MSc) award. Section 3.3 gives details about outcomes from study to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate (PCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PDip) awards.

On successful completion of this programme participants should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of, or explain:

  • the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to public health engineering and environmental management and ways to integrate various perspectives in project planning
  • the links between water, sanitation and health
  • key issues relating to pollution control, particularly relating to aquatic environments
  • ways of integrating technical and non-technical considerations into project planning, design, execution and evaluation
  • key issues in relation to effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and replicability in planning public health infrastructure and services with a view to reducing their impact on the environment
  • key issues in relation to social and institutional aspects, particularly for sustainability of water supply and environmental sanitation services that have minimum impact on the environment
  • major international developments and initiatives, relating to some of the above-mentioned aspects
  • current international perspectives on water resources, the principles of integrated water resources management and its advantages and disadvantages in specific situations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • integrate and evaluate multi-disciplinary information, particularly that which relates to pollution control for the aquatic environment
  • critically evaluate basic water supply and environmental sanitation options suitable for low- and middle-income countries, and be able to select appropriate options subject to specific constraints
  • critically evaluate key water and sanitation sector reform issues such as new public management, decentralization and public-private partnerships
  • plan appropriate solutions to meet users’ needs and demands for water supply and environmental sanitation. This will include an interdisciplinary approach and application of appropriate techniques for technical, financial and institutional analysis
  • conduct a programme of original research, demonstrating originality in the interpretation and application of knowledge
  • analyse water resources problems at regional or catchment level, identify causal processes for water resources problems and suggest possible solutions.  This skill will include an ability to:

-  assess water availability using rainfall, river flow and groundwater data

-  develop an integrated programme for improving water resource management.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:
  • apply knowledge gained about water, hygiene and sanitation to real-life situations and realistic scenarios.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • conduct a literature review, demonstrating critical analysis and using conventions and approaches relevant to the water, hygiene and sanitation sector
  • apply knowledge and research findings to tackle and to propose possible options for solving problems
  • analyse data, check the validity of data, and make appropriate use of data when writing reports
  • communicate effectively in writing essays and reports. This will include presentation and justification of conclusions from quantitative and qualitative analyses
  • manage time and work to deadlines.

 

3.3       Intended Learning Outcomes for Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) Awards

Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert)

The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Certificate are best defined by combining the intended learning outcomes of each of the four modules chosen to contribute to the programme (see Section 4.2).  An index list of all module specifications can be found at https://lucas.lboro.ac.uk/epublic/wp5016.main?dept=CV&dept2=CV

Postgraduate Certificate students should obtain the learning outcomes listed above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme but not to the extent that will be expected of MSc students. However, the learning outcomes arising specifically from the Case Study, Data Collection, Analysis and Research and Research Dissertation are not relevant because these modules are not options for the Certificate programme.

Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip)
The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Diploma will be the same as those specified above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme other than those that relate to the Research Dissertation module which is not an option for the Diploma programme.

4. Programme structure

4.1   The programme comprises selections from the following modules that are all studied by Distance Learning (DL).

 

Code

 

Module Title

Credit

Weighting

CVP229*¹

Group Project (DL)

15

CVP251*²

Management of Water and Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP252*²

Water and Environmental Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP253*

Data Collection, Analysis and Research (DL)

15

CVP257*

Wastewater Treatment (DL)

15

CVP262*

Environmental Assessment (DL)

15

CVP265*

Water for Low-Income Communities (DL)

15

CVP268*

Integrated Water Resources Management (DL)

15

CVP269*

Solid Waste Management (DL)

15

CVP272*

Low-Cost Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP273*

Water Utilities Management - Version 1 (DL)

15

CVP278*

Case Study (DL)

15

 

CVP296*

Research Dissertation (DL) (Two-year option)

60

CVP298*

Research Dissertation (DL) (One-year option)

60

 IMPORTANT NOTES:

*  Fully DL module.

¹ CVP229 is only available as an option in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

² Introductory modules, normally studied first for all awards.

 

4.2    Modules required for each level of the Water and Environmental Management programme are shown in the following tables. 

 

For the award of Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), students must choose the following four modules: 

Compulsory modules

(prefix with CVP)

Optional modules

(prefix with CVP)

251, 252, 262, AND 268

No options

 

For the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), students must choose eight modules from the following: 

Compulsory modules

(prefix with CVP)

Optional modules

(prefix with CVP)

 

251, 252, 262, 268 AND 278

Three of the following:

253, 257, 265, 269, 272, 273, [229¹]

Notes:

If a diploma student is planning at some later stage to upgrade his/her diploma to an MSc, he/she should to choose to study module CVP253 (Data Collection, Analysis and Research) as part of the diploma because this is a compulsory module for MSc students, who also need to study CVP296/298 (Research Dissertation). 

¹ CVP229 is only available as an option in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

 

For the award of Master of Science (MSc), students must choose nine modules from the following:

Compulsory modules

(prefix with CVP)

Optional modules

(prefix with CVP)

251, 252, 253, 262, 268, 278, AND

296/298

Two of the following:

257, 265, 269, 272, 273, [229¹]

 ¹ CVP229 is only available as an option in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Water and Waste Engineering (Distance Learning)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate are accredited by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) for student intakes in academic years up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.

The MSc is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), for student  intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title Water and Waste Engineering (Distance Learning)
Programme code CVPT77
Length of programme MSc: 2-8 years, Diploma: 1-5 years, Certificate: 1-3 years. Delivered by Distance Learning (largely paper-based).
Participants have the option of two start dates: Mid-January and Mid-July.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

 

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/masters-degrees/a-z/water-waste-engineering-distance/

Additional information about the programme is available from http://wedc.lboro.ac.uk//learn/wwe.html

 

 

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is likely to be of particular interest to applicants who wish to develop careers in aspects of design, implementation and management of water supply and waste management for low- and middle-income countries.  It aims to:

  • Provide Engineers and Scientists with the knowledge and skills to meet the global challenge of basic services for low- and middle-income countries;
  • Develop participants’ understanding of important aspects of sustainable public health infrastructure and services for all levels of consumers;
  • Equip students with appropriate expertise and skills for work in low- and middle-income countries; and
  • Provide an opportunity for specialisation in one topic through in depth study during the Research Dissertation module.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

This programme is taught by the Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC) in the School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering at Loughborough University. The WEDC Mission Statement is:

Education, training, research and consultancy for improved planning, provision and management of physical infrastructure and services for development in low- and middle-income countries, focusing on the needs and demands of the poor.

This specification has taken into account the descriptors for a qualification at Masters (MSc), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) levels that are set out in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

WEDC’s postgraduate programmes are multidisciplinary in content so no single-subject benchmarks are wholly applicable to them. There are currently no benchmark statements for Engineering MSc programmes. Although the Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering applies to first degrees in engineering, and not to postgraduate degrees, it has been used to inform the drafting of intended learning outcomes for this programme, with the expectation that postgraduate students attain a higher level than undergraduate students in relevant outcomes. The Subject Benchmark Statement for Master’s Awards in Business and Management has also been consulted because of the management content of the WEDC programmes; the list of skills for all Master’s programmes listed in Appendix 2 is of particular relevance.  Note has also been taken of the Engineering Council document The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (published May 2014) for Master Degrees other than the Integrated Masters (MEng) (Accredited as further learning to masters level, partially meeting the educational requirements for CEng).

Following an accreditation visit by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) in June 2016, the panel recommended that this programme at MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate levels be accredited for student intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  Accreditation recognises that this programme contributes to the academic requirements for CIWEM membership.

Following an accreditation visit in October 2015, the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) accredited the MSc level of this programme as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree.  This applies for intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

Sections 3.1 and 3.2 relate to the outcomes from study for the Master of Science (MSc) award.  Section 3.3 gives details about outcomes from study to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate (PCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PDip) awards.

On successful completion of this programme participants should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of, or explain:

  • the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to public health engineering and ways to integrate various perspectives in project planning
  • the links between water, sanitation and health
  • ways of integrating technical and non-technical considerations into project planning, design, execution and evaluation
  • key issues in relation to effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and replicability in planning public health infrastructure and services
  • key issues in relation to social and institutional aspects, particularly for sustainability of water supply and environmental sanitation services
  • major international developments and initiatives, relating to some of the above-mentioned aspects

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • integrate and evaluate multi-disciplinary information relating to water, hygiene and sanitation
  • critically evaluate basic water supply and environmental sanitation options suitable for low- and middle-income countries, and be able to select appropriate options subject to specific constraints
  • critically evaluate key water and sanitation sector reform issues such as new public management, decentralization and public-private partnerships
  • plan appropriate solutions to meet users’ needs and demands for water supply and environmental sanitation.  This will use an interdisciplinary approach, and require application of appropriate techniques for technical, financial and institutional analysis.
  • conduct a programme of research, demonstrating originality in the interpretation and application of knowledge.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • apply knowledge gained about water, hygiene and sanitation to real-life situations and realistic scenarios.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:  

  • conduct a literature review, demonstrating critical analysis and using conventions and approaches relevant to the water, hygiene and sanitation sector
  • apply knowledge and research findings to tackle and propose possible options for solving problems
  • analyse data, check the validity of data, and make appropriate use of data when writing reports
  • communicate effectively in writing essays and reports.  This will include presentation and justification of conclusions from quantitative and qualitative analyses
  • manage time and work to deadlines

 

 3.3       Intended Learning Outcomes for Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) Awards:

  • Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert)

The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Certificate are best defined by combining the intended learning outcomes of each of the four modules chosen to contribute to the programme (see Section 4.2).  An index list of all module specifications can be found at https://lucas.lboro.ac.uk/epublic/wp5016.main?dept=CV&dept2=CV

Postgraduate Certificate students should obtain the general learning outcomes listed above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme but not to the extent that will be expected of MSc students. However, the learning outcomes arising specifically from the Case Study and Research Dissertation are not relevant because none of these modules are options for the Certificate programme.

  • Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip)

The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Diploma will be the same as those listed above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme other than those that relate to the Research Dissertation module which is not an option for the Diploma programme.

4. Programme structure

4.1    The programme comprises selections from the following modules that are all studied by Distance Learning (DL).

 

Code

 

Module Title

Credit

Weighting

CVP229*²

Group Project (DL)

15

CVP251*³

Management of Water and Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP252*³

Water and Environmental Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP253*¹

Data Collection, Analysis and Research (DL)¹

15

CVP257*

Wastewater Treatment (DL)

15

CVP258*

Urban Infrastructure - Version 1 (DL)

15

CVP262*¹

Environmental Assessment (DL)¹

15

CVP265*

Water for Low-Income Communities (DL)

15

CVP268*

Integrated Water Resources Management (DL)

15

CVP269*

Solid Waste Management (DL)

15

CVP272*

Low-Cost Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP273*

Water Utilities Management (DL)

15

CVP278*

Case Study (DL)

15

 

CVP296*

Research Dissertation (DL) (Two-year option)³

60

CVP298*

Research Dissertation (DL) (One-year option)³

60

IMPORTANT NOTES:

* Fully DL module.

¹ Module CVP262 is not an option for students who started their programme after January 2014.  Instead CVP268 can be chosen.

² CVP229 is only available as an option in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

³ Introductory modules, normally studied first for all awards.

  

4.2    Modules required for each level of the Water and Waste Engineering programme are shown in the following tables. 

 

For the award of Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), students must choose the following four modules: 

Compulsory modules

(prefix with CVP)

Optional modules

(prefix with CVP)

 251, 252

Two of the following:

257, 258, 265, 269, 272

 

For the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), students must choose eight modules from the following: 

Compulsory modules

(prefix with CVP)

Optional modules

(prefix with CVP)

 251, 252 AND 278

Five of the following:

253, 257, 258, 265, 268 (or 262¹), 269, 272, 273, [229²]

 Notes:

¹ Module CVP262 is not an option for students who started their programme in January 2014 or after.

² CVP229 is only available as an option in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

If a diploma students is planning at some later stage to upgrade his/her diploma to an MSc he/she should to choose to study module CVP253 (Data Collection, Analysis and Research) as part of the diploma because this is a compulsory module for MSc students, who also need to study CVP296/298 (Research Dissertation).

 

For the award of Master of Science (MSc), students must choose nine modules from the following:

Compulsory modules

(prefix with CVP)

Optional modules

(prefix with CVP)

251, 252, 253, 278, AND 296/298

Four of the following:

257, 258, 265, 268 (or 262¹) 269, 272, 273, [229²]

 Note:

¹ Module CVP262 is not an option for students who started their programme in January 2014 or after.  Instead CVP268 can be chosen.

² CVP229 is only available as an option in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Water and Waste Engineering

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate are accredited by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) for student intakes in academic years up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.

The MSc is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), for student  intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title Water and Waste Engineering
Programme code CVPT70 (taught) + CVPT79 (mixed: taught and distance learning)
Length of programme CVPT70 - MSc: 1 year full-time, Diploma: 9 months full-time, Certificate: 2-3 months full-time CVPT79 - maximum 8 years
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT77

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is likely to be of particular interest to applicants who wish to develop careers in aspects of design, implementation and management of water supply and waste management for low- and middle-income countries.  It aims to: 

  • Provide Engineers and Scientists with the knowledge and skills to meet the global challenge of basic services for low- and middle-income countries;
  • Develop participants’ understanding of important aspects of sustainable public health infrastructure and services for all levels of consumers;
  • Equip students with appropriate expertise and skills for work in low- and middle-income countries; and
  • Provide an opportunity for specialisation in one topic through in depth study during the Research Dissertation module.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

This specification has taken into account the descriptors for a qualification at Masters (MSc), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) levels that are set out in the “Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.”

This MSc programme is taught by the Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC) in the School of Civil and Building Engineering at Loughborough University.  The WEDC Mission Statement is:

Education, training, research and consultancy for improved planning, provision and management of physical infrastructure and services for development in low- and middle-income countries, focusing on the needs and demands of the poor.

WEDC’s postgraduate programmes are multidisciplinary in content so no single-subject benchmarks are wholly applicable to them. There are currently no benchmark statements for Engineering MSc programmes. Although the Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering applies to first degrees in engineering, and not to postgraduate degrees, it has been used to inform the drafting of intended learning outcomes for this programme, with the expectation that postgraduate students attain a higher level than undergraduate students in relevant outcomes. The Subject Benchmark Statement for Master’s Awards in Business and Management has also been consulted because of the management content of the WEDC programmes; the list of skills for all Master’s programmes listed in Appendix 2 is of particular relevance.  Note has also been taken of the Engineering Council document The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (published May 2014) for Master Degrees other than the Integrated Masters (MEng) (Accredited as further learning to masters level, partially meeting the educational requirements for CEng).

Following an accreditation visit by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) in June 2016, the panel recommended that this programme at MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate levels be accredited for student intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  Accreditation recognises that this programme contributes to the academic requirements for CIWEM membership.

Following an accreditation visit in October 2015, the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) accredited the MSc level of this programme as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree.  This applies for intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme participants should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of, or explain:

  • the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach to public health engineering and ways to integrate various perspectives in project planning
  • the links between water, sanitation and health
  • ways of integrating technical and non-technical considerations into project planning, design, execution and evaluation
  • key issues in relation to effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and replicability in planning public health infrastructure and services
  • key issues in relation to social and institutional aspects particularly for sustainability of water supply and environmental sanitation services
  • major international developments and initiatives, relating to some of the above-mentioned aspects

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • integrate and evaluate multi-disciplinary information
  • critically evaluate basic water supply and environmental sanitation options suitable for low- and middle-income countries, and be able to select appropriate options subject to specific constraints
  • critically evaluate key water and sanitation sector reform issues such as new public management, decentralisation and public private partnerships
  • plan appropriate solutions to meet users’ needs and demands for water supply and environmental sanitation.  This will include an interdisciplinary approach and application of appropriate techniques for technical, financial and institutional analysis
  • conduct a programme of research, demonstrating originality in the interpretation and application of knowledge.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

 

On successful completion of this programme, participants[1]should be able to:

  • apply knowledge gained about water, hygiene and sanitation to real-life situations and realistic scenarios.
  • conduct practical work for laboratory and field analysis of common water quality parameters.

[1] Gaining these practical skills is not applicable to Distance Learners who do not also come to Loughborough.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • conduct a literature review, demonstrating critical analysis and using conventions and approaches relevant to the water, hygiene and sanitation sector.
  • apply knowledge and research findings to tackle and propose possible options for solving problems.
  • analyse data, check the validity of data, and make appropriate use of data when writing reports.
  • critically evaluate the experience[2]of working as a member of a small team: reflecting on and analysing experiences, and critiquing the roles of team members.
  • manage time and work to deadlines.

[2] Experience of working in a group is not gained if the Case Study (DL) or Group Project (DL) module is chosen instead of the Group Project.

 

3.3 Intended Learning Outcomes for Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) Awards

Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert)

The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Certificate are best defined by combining the intended learning outcomes of each of the four modules chosen to contribute to the programme (see Section 4.2). An index list of all module specifications can be found at https://lucas.lboro.ac.uk/epublic/wp5016.main?dept=CV&dept2=CV

Postgraduate Certificate students should obtain the learning outcomes listed above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme but not to the extent that will be expected of MSc students.

However, the learning outcomes arising specifically from the Group Project and Research Dissertation are not relevant because these modules are not options for the Certificate programme.

Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip)

The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Diploma the same as those specified above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme other than those that relate to the Research Dissertation module which is not an option for the Diploma programme.

4. Programme structure

4.1    The modules comprising the Programmes are listed below:  The letters (DL) and an asterisk (*) beside the module code indicate modules offered by Distance Learning.  Only those modules specified in Section 4.2 can contribute to the Water and Waste Engineering programmes. 

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

CVP201

Management of Water and Sanitation

15

CVP207

Wastewater Treatment

15

CVP215

Small-scale Water Supply and Sanitation

15

CVP218

Integrated Water Resources Management

15

CVP219

Solid Waste Management

15

CVP223

Water Utilities Management - Version 1

15

CVP227

Data collection, analysis and research

15

CVP228

Group Project

15

CVP235

Water and Waste Engineering Principles

15

CVP240

Short Project – Topical Review

15

CVP292

Research Dissertation (60 credits – 20 weeks)

60

CVP293

Research Dissertation (60 credits – 72 weeks)

60

 

Note that the following Distance Learning modules may contribute to Programme Code CVPT79, but not to Programme Code CVPT70.  

 

CVP224*

Water Utilities Management - Version 2 (DL)

15

CVP229*

Group Project (DL)

15

CVP251*

Management of Water and Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP252*

Water and Environmental Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP253*

Data collection, analysis and research (DL)

15

CVP257*

Wastewater Treatment (DL)

15

CVP265*

Water for Low-Income Communities (DL)

15

CVP268*

Integrated Water Resources Management (DL)

15

CVP269*

Solid Waste Management (DL)

15

CVP272*

Low Cost Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP273*

Water Utilities Management (DL)

15

CVP278*

Case Study (DL)

15

CVP296*

Research Dissertation (60 credits – Two-years) (DL)

60

CVP298*

Research Dissertation (60 credits – One-year) (DL)

60

 * by Distance Learning

The right is reserved to withdraw or make amendment to the modules available at the beginning of each session.

CVP224* and CVP229* are only available in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

 

4.2    Modules required for each level of programme are shown in the following tables.  (WWE stands for Water and Waste Engineering.)

For the award of Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert), students must choose four modules from the following: 

 

Postgrad Certificate

Compulsory modules

(Two)

Optional modules

(Choose two)

 

WWE

CVP201 or CVP251*,

CVP235 or CVP252*.

CVP207 or CVP257*,

CVP215,

CVP223, CVP224* or CVP273*,

CVP227 or CVP253*,

CVP265*,

CVP218 or CVP268*,

CVP219 or CVP269*,

CVP240,

CVP272*.

 * by Distance Learning

 

For the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), students must choose eight modules from the following: 

 

Postgrad Diploma

Compulsory modules

(Five)

Optional modules

(Choose three)

 

WWE

CVP201 or CVP251*,

CVP223 or CVP224* or CVP273*,

CVP235 or CVP252*,

CVP227 or CVP253*,

CVP228 or CVP229* or CVP278*.

CVP207 or CVP257*,

CVP215

CVP265*,

CVP218 or CVP268*,

CVP219 or CVP269*,

CVP240,

CVP272*.

 * by Distance Learning

 CVP224* and CVP229* are only available in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

 

For the award of Master of Science (MSc), students must choose nine modules from the following: 

 

MSc

Compulsory modules

(Six)

Optional modules

(Choose three, but see Paragraph 4.3 below)

 

WWE

CVP201 or CVP251*,

CVP223 or CVP224* or CVP273*,

CVP235 or CVP252*,

CVP227 or CVP253*,

CVP228 or CVP229* or CVP278*,

CVP292 or CVP293 or CVP296* or CVP298*.

CVP207 or CVP257*,

CVP215

CVP265*,

CVP218 or CVP268*,

CVP219 or CVP269*,

CVP240,

CVP272*.

 * by Distance Learning

 CVP224* and CVP229* are only available in special circumstances.  Please enquire for details.

 

4.3    Module Numbers CVP251*, CVP252*, CVP253*, CVP257*, CVP265*, CVP268*, CVP269*, CVP272*, CVP273*, CVP278*, CVP296* and CVP298* are studied by Distance-learning.  Some of these (CVP251*, CVP252*, CVP253*, CVP257*, CVP268*, CVP269*, CVP273*, CVP278*, CVP296* and CVP298*) are direct alternatives to modules CVP201, CVP235, CVP227, CVP207, CVP218, CVP219, CVP223, CVP293 and CVP292 respectively, which are taught at Loughborough University.  CVP224* is a direct alternative to CVP223 and CVP273*.  CVP229* is a direct alternative to CVP228 and CVP278*.  Candidates may not study two modules having the same Module Title but taught using different techniques.

 

4.4  Module Numbers CVP265* and/or CVP272* may not be studied in place of CVP215; but candidates may not study CVP215 in addition to either CVP265* orCVP272*.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Infrastructure in Emergencies (Distance Learning)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate are accredited by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) for student intakes in academic years up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.

The MSc is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), for student  intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Final award MSc, PG Dip, PG Cert
Programme title Infrastructure in Emergencies (Distance Learning)
Programme code CVPT80
Length of programme MSc: 2-8 years, Diploma: 1-5 years, Certificate: 1-3 years. Delivered by Distance Learning (largely paper-based).
Participants have the option of two start dates: Mid-January and Mid-July.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

 Part Time MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT80

 

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is for graduates with little or no practical experience of emergency infrastructure provision, as well as experienced practitioners who have a specific interest in addressing the problems of emergency infrastructure in low- and middle-income countries. It aims to: 

  • Equip participants with appropriate expertise and skills for emergency relief and reconstruction work;
  • Improve knowledge and skills in the assessment, planning, design and implementation of a range of infrastructure options for emergency relief and reconstruction; and
  • Provide an opportunity for specialisation in one topic through in depth study during the Research Dissertation module.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

This programme is taught by the Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC) in the School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering at Loughborough University. The WEDC Mission Statement is:

Education, training, research and consultancy for improved planning, provision and management of physical infrastructure and services for development in low- and middle-income countries, focusing on the needs and demands of the poor.

This specification has taken into account the descriptors for a qualification at Masters (MSc), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) levels that are set out in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

WEDC’s postgraduate programmes are multidisciplinary in content so no single- subject benchmarks are wholly applicable to them. There are currently no benchmark statements for Engineering MSc programmes. Although the Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering applies to first degrees in engineering, and not to postgraduate degrees, it has been used to inform the drafting of intended learning outcomes for this programme, with the expectation that postgraduate students attain a higher level than undergraduate students in relevant outcomes.  Note has also been taken of the Engineering Council document The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (published May 2014) for Master Degrees other than the Integrated Masters (MEng) (Accredited as further learning to masters level, partially meeting the educational requirements for CEng).

Following an accreditation visit by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) in June 2016, the panel recommended that this programme at MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate levels be accredited for student intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  Accreditation recognises that this programme contributes to the academic requirements for CIWEM membership.

Following an accreditation visit in October 2015, the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) accredited the MSc level of this programme as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree.  This applies for intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.  See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

Sections 3.1 and 3.2 relate to the outcomes from study for the Master of Science (MSc) award. Section 3.3 gives details about outcomes from study to achieve the Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) awards.

 

On successful completion of this programme participants should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • The stages and types of emergencies, their causes, consequences and key principles of emergency response.
  • Principles and strategies for assessment, planning, financing and management of emergency response.
  • Ethics and accountability in delivering humanitarian assistance.
  • The principles of provision of a range of infrastructure options in an emergency.
  • The  range  of  suitable  technologies,  their  design,  implementation  and management, for water supply and sanitation during emergencies and reconstruction.
  • The design and management of the reconstruction of essential infrastructure post-emergency.
  • How to investigate complex real-life problems in detail and identify possible solutions.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • Explain how emergency situations may occur and their likely consequences.
  • Explain the key principles of working with disaster-affected populations and providing effective humanitarian assistance.
  • Explain the options for a range of infrastructure facilities and services during and following emergencies, and how they should be planned, implemented and maintained.
  • Describe  important  technical  and  non-technical  aspects  of  organising infrastructure provision in emergencies.
  • Describe key features of a range of common emergency water supply and sanitation technologies, and select suitable technologies to meet specific criteria.
  • Describe the standard procedures for assessing, managing and protecting the environment and water resources.
  • Conduct a programme of research, demonstrating originality in the interpretation and application of knowledge.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • Prepare outline designs for simple low-cost water supply and sanitation systems to meet emergency and reconstruction needs.
  • Investigate complex real-life problems in detail and identify possible solutions.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, participants should be able to:

  • Conduct a literature review, demonstrating critical analysis and using conventions and approaches relevant to providing infrastructure (particularly water supply and sanitation) in emergencies.
  • Apply knowledge and research findings to tackle and propose possible options for solving problems.
  • Analyse data, check the validity of data and make appropriate use of data when writing reports.
  • Communicate effectively in writing essays and reports. This will include presentation and justification of conclusions from quantitative and qualitative analyses.
  • Manage time and work to meet deadlines.

 

3.3 Intended Learning Outcomes for Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) and Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) Awards:

  • Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert)

The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Certificate are best defined by combining the intended learning outcomes of each of the four modules chosen to contribute to the programme (see Section 4.2).  An index list of all module specifications can be found at https://lucas.lboro.ac.uk/epublic/wp5016.main?dept=CV&dept2=CV

Postgraduate Certificate students should obtain the learning outcomes listed above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme but not to the extent that will be expected of MSc students. However, the learning outcomes arising specifically from Data Collection, Analysis and Research and Research Dissertation are not relevant because these modules are not options for the Certificate programme.

  • Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip)

The intended learning outcomes for studies that contribute to the Postgraduate Diploma will be the same as those specified above (Sections 3.1 and 3.2) for the MSc programme other than those that relate to the Research Dissertation module which is not an option for the Diploma programme.

4. Programme structure

4.1    The following distance learning modules are available for study under this programme:

Code

Module Title

Credit Weighting

CVP253*

Data Collection, Analysis and Research (DL)

15

CVP257*

Wastewater Treatment (DL)

15

CVP258*

Urban Infrastructure (DL)

15

CVP262*

Environmental Assessment (DL)

15

CVP268*

Integrated Water Resources Management (DL)

15

CVP273*

Water Utilities Management - Version 1 (DL)

15

CVP280*

Emergencies Management and People (DL)¹

15

CVP281*

Emergency Water Supply (DL)

15

CVP282*

Emergency Sanitation (DL)

15

CVP283*

Introduction to Infrastructure in Emergencies (DL)¹

15

CVP296*

Research Dissertation (DL) (Two-year option)

60

CVP298*

Research Dissertation (DL) (One-year option)

60

Notes:

*  Fully DL module.

¹  Introductory modules, normally taken first for all awards.

 

4.2    Modules required for each level of the programme are as follows: 

For the award of Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) students must take the following modules: 

Compulsory modules

Optional modules

CVP280*

Emergencies Management and People (DL)¹

 

None

CVP283*

Introduction to Infrastructure in Emergencies (DL)¹

 

 

CVP281*

Emergency Water Supply (DL)

 

 

CVP282*

Emergency Sanitation (DL)

 

 

 ¹ Introductory modules, normally taken first.

 

For the award of Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), students must take the following modules: 

Compulsory modules

Optional modules (Select Four)

CVP280*

Emergencies Management and People (DL)¹

CVP258*

Urban Infrastructure (DL)

 

CVP283*

Introduction to Infrastructure in Emergencies (DL)¹

CVP257*

Wastewater Treatment (DL)

CVP281*

Emergency Water Supply (DL)

CVP262*

Environmental Assessment (DL)

CVP282*

Emergency Sanitation (DL)

CVP268*

Integrated Water Resources Management (DL)

 

 

CVP273*

Water Utilities Management - Version 1 (DL)

 

 

CVP253*²

Data Collection, Analysis and Research (DL)²

 Notes:

 ¹  Introductory modules, normally taken first.

 ²  CVP253 is compulsory for students intending to upgrade to an MSc at a later date.

 

For the award of Master of Science (MSc), students must take the following modules: 

Compulsory modules

Optional modules (Select Three)

CVP280*

Emergencies Management and People (DL)¹

CVP258*

Urban Infrastructure (DL)

CVP283*

Introduction to Infrastructure in Emergencies (DL)¹

CVP257*

Wastewater Treatment (DL)

CVP281*

Emergency Water Supply (DL)

CVP262*

Environmental Assessment (DL)

CVP282*

Emergency Sanitation (DL)

CVP268*

Integrated Water Resources Management (DL)

CVP253*

Data Collection, Analysis and Research (DL)

CVP273*

Water Utilities Management - Version 1 (DL)

 

 

CVP296*

 

 

CVP298*

AND - Select one of the following

 

Research Dissertation (DL) (Two year option)²

OR

Research Dissertation (DL) (One year option)²

 

 

 Notes:

¹  Introductory modules, normally taken first.

²  Normally the last or penultimate module to be studied.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Air Transport Management

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT), UK

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert (PGDip and PGCert only available as exit award)
Programme title Air Transport Management
Programme code CVPT48
Length of programme Minimum of 1 year (full-time)
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT48

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This MSc programme is intended for students who have some prior knowledge of the air transport industry at honours degree level (or equivalent international degree qualification) and those who wish to take a specialist postgraduate degree in air transport.  The programme aims to provide students with a comprehensive, practical and critical understanding of the regulatory, operational and commercial environment of Air Transport Management and equip graduates with a range of transferrable knowledge and advanced research skills that can be applied in the workplace.

Specifically, the programme is designed to:

  • Develop and extend in-depth knowledge and understanding of the structure and operation of the commercial air transport industry from an international perspective, including the regulatory, political and economic environments in which it operates, the processes it employs and the challenges it faces;
  • Enhance critical thinking and analytical skills through exposure to the latest academic research and a rigorous theoretically-informed but industry relevant interdisciplinary approach;
  • Advance an insightful holistic understanding of the air transport industry through research and problem solving;
  • Improve employment prospects through the acquisition of subject specific knowledge, research techniques and professional skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

There is no nationally agreed subject benchmark statement for air transport programmes.  The external and internal benchmark standards which have been devised are based on the relevant accreditation requirements of the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, the professional body with chartered status, the 3rd Edition of the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (SPEC), and the University's current Learning and Teaching Strategy and the research interests and specialist expertise of the contributing teaching staff.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • Key air transport management issues facing airports and airlines worldwide;
  • Processes of globalisation, mobility and the demand for air transport;
  • Research methods and data sources of relevance to air transport;
  • Business, operational and marketing issues pertinent to the commercial air transport industry;
  • Aviation policy and regulation, airport planning and operations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Identify and apply specialist interdisciplinary knowledge that needs to be exploited to devise and evaluate possible solutions to air transport management challenges worldwide;
  • Undertake, analyse and present tasks or projects in any of the disciplines relevant to the programme;
  • Demonstrate quantitative and qualitative skills that permit in-depth critical analysis and assessment of practices relating to air transport planning and operations.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Apply fundamental theoretical and practical knowledge of air transport planning and operations in a real world setting;
  • Study the implications of decisions taken within air transport that contribute to (un)acceptable levels of operational performance or social/environmental impact;
  • Understand the interactions and trade-offs that occur between the economic, operational, social and/or environmental performance of air transport and their implications for policy and practice from the local to the global level;
  • Have a critical awareness of the factors affecting the demand for, supply of, and consequences arising from, commercial air transport operations worldwide.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively (both orally and in writing) using a variety of media;
  • Work effectively and efficiently both individually and as part of a team;
  • Demonstrate problem-solving skills, including problems where information is limited, contradictory, and/or unreliable;
  • Demonstrate proficiency in research ethics, data handling and analysis.

4. Programme structure

All modules are compulsory.

Code

Module Title

Modular Weight

Semester 1

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP340

International Air Transport Management

15

CVP342

Statistical Analysis for Air Transport

15

CVP345

Airports, Cities and Development

15

Semester 2

CVP341

Airline Operations and Marketing

15

CVP343

Policy, Planning and Design for Air Transport

15

CVP344

Environmental Management and Mitigation for Air Transport

15

CVP346

Aviation Safety

15

Semesters 1 & 2

CVP097

Research Dissertation

60

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

All modules will be available in the Special Assessment Period (SAP) unless specifed in the Module Specification.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Low Energy Building Services Engineering

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The programme is accredited for further learning for CEng and professional membership by CIBSE and the Energy Institute

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title Low Energy Building Services Engineering
Programme code CVPT39/45
Length of programme The programme registration is for a minimum of 1 year (full-time) and 2 years (part-time) and a maximum of 3 years (full-time) and 5 years (part-time).
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

Full Time MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT39

Part Time MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT39

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide a high quality education in the field of building services engineering and associated building design disciplines; successful completion of the programme allowing students to have a progressive career within Building Services Engineering industry.
  • To provide students with a critical understanding of the design of mechanical building services systems, the design and operation of building, thermal and 3D Building Information Modelling (BIM).
  • To provide students with a thorough appreciation of the holistic perspective of the processes in the design and operation of building, including low temperature systems and low energy buildings.
  • To develop a strong approach to problem solving and techniques for cost and value management, including the resolution of conflicting design goals.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to develop their key transferable and technical skills, including skills in research and managing teams.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Benchmark statements for engineering.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
  • CIBSE Competence Criteria for Corporate Membership (based on the Competence Statements issued by the Engineering Council).
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

  • The factors that influence human thermal comfort, visual and acoustic comfort and indoor air quality, and their impact on people’s wellbeing in buildings worldwide.
  • The elements of a building energy balance and the process of estimating building thermal loads and their diversity.
  • The design and analysis of HVAC, primary plant, including boilers, refrigeration systems, district heating networks, and combined heat and power systems.
  • The elements of an intelligent building energy control system, together with supervisory, MPC and local-loop control strategies.
  • Procedures for the commissioning of building energy systems, soft landings and POE: to solve the performance gap between design intentions and operational outcomes.
  • The BREEAM scheme, design principles of low and zero energy and carbon buildings, including natural ventilation and climate responsive design.
  • The numerical procedures used in building thermal performance models, together with an understanding of the elements of good practice methods in building thermal modelling and in linking BIM to thermal models.
  • The research process: aims and objectives, critical literature review, knowledge gaps, how to develop a methodology applicable to the field of low energy building services engineering.
  • Electrical and power distributions systems in building together with Renewable generation technologies and systems.
  • The key fundamental management principles and theory (such as motivation, teamwork, leadership, task management) and how they can be applied to managing people within the context of the construction project environment.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Analyse, critically appraise and solve both numerical and qualitative problems of a familiar or unfamiliar nature.
  • Conduct appropriate designed surveys involving indoor environmental measurements alongside occupant subjective data gathering.
  • Act independently, or in a group, and be able to adapt to dynamically changing situations that arise from the solution of multi-faceted and evolving building design and human thermal comfort problems.
  • Evaluate the implications of HVAC equipment selection to the design of the building electrical power system and building energy performance.
  • Critically analyse and balance the heating load in building using different systems including renewables and associated storage systems.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Set appropriate thermal comfort, visual and acoustic comfort and indoor air quality design criteria for specific design contexts.
  • Calculate building heat loads and Identify suitable control zones for a building.
  • Select primary and secondary system types that operate to meet the desired internal environmental design conditions, and with the minimum of energy use.
  • Determine the thermal capacity of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning secondary systems (including hydronic heating systems).
  • Complete a low energy design for a building control system, including the selection of sensors, and local loop and supervisory control strategies.
  • Produce a low energy building design concept based on using a simplified 3D BIM model, work with and manage a design team to produce multiple conceptual design alternatives in response to a project brief.
  • Develop procedures for thermal comfort, POE, soft landings, commissioning of building thermal systems.
  • Perform short research projects, in the field of building services engineering and sustainable building energy.
  • Design basic electrical distribution system in accordance with relevant standards.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Communicate effectively using a variety of media.
  • Use information technology (IT), such as word-processors, spreadsheets, presentation packages, email, and the world-wide web.
  • Demonstrate problem-solving skills, including problems where information is limited, contradictory, and/or unreliable.
  • Demonstrate numeracy, mathematical skills, and computational skills.
  • Undertake a critical appraisal of their work and/or that of their peers.
  • Work effectively as a team member.
  • Manage workloads and time effectively.
  • Understand the importance of working within the relevant guidance related to ethics and confidentiality, when working with human subjects.

4. Programme structure

SEMESTER ONE

Compulsory modules

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP302

Wellbeing and Indoor Environment 

15

CVP305

Building Thermal Loads and Systems

15

CVP310

Thermal Modelling and 3D Building Information Modelling (BIM)     

15

CVP319

Research Methods

15

 

SEMESTER TWO

Compulsory modules

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP300

Electrical Systems: Buildings and Renewable Energy

15

CVP306

Building Energy Supply Systems and District Energy Networks

15

 

Optional modules

Two modules from

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP307

Control and Commissioning for Low Energy Buildings

15

CVP309

Low Energy Building Design

15

CVP324

Design Management

15

CVP329

People and Teams

15

CVP335

Federated Building Information Modelling

15

 

SEMESTER ONE & TWO

Compulsory module

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP313

Research Dissertation

60

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc International Water and Sanitation Engineering

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate are accredited by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) for student intakes in academic years up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.

The MSc is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), for student  intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title International Water and Sanitation Engineering
Programme code CVPT70
Length of programme MSc: 1 year full-time, Diploma: 9 months full-time, Certificate: 4 months full-time
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT70

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is for graduate engineers and scientists who wish to develop careers in delivering water and environmental sanitation infrastructure for low and middle-income countries. It aims to: 

•    provide the multidisciplinary knowledge and skills to assess, design, implement and operate water and environmental sanitation infrastructure, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries;

•    develop a critical approach to the global principles and local practice of sustainable public health infrastructure for all levels of consumers;

•    equip students with appropriate expertise and skills for relevant work in water and sanitation engineering for low- and middle-income countries; and

•    encourage critical analysis through in-depth study of one specialist topic.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

This specification has taken into account the descriptors for a qualification at Masters (MSc), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) levels that are set out in the Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. 

In the absence of benchmark statements for Engineering MSc programmes. the Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering that applies to first degrees in engineering has been used to inform the drafting of intended learning outcomes but with the expectation that postgraduate students attain a higher level than undergraduate students in relevant outcomes. Note has also been taken of the Engineering Council document ‘The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (published May 2014) for Master Degrees other than the Integrated Masters (MEng) (Accredited as further learning to masters level, partially meeting the educational requirements for CEng)’. 

In view of the management content of this programme the Subject Benchmark Statement for Master’s Awards in Business and Management has also been consulted.  The programme draws on the core competencies required for membership of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM), and the competencies for a water, sanitation and hygiene project manager published by a consortium of twelve international agencies (2017).

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

PGCert:

K1  International and local initiatives and institutions that promote water and sanitation for all.

K2 the links between water and environmental sanitation infrastructure (including water resource management, water treatment and supply, excreta, wastewater, stormwater and solid waste treatment and disposal), hygiene behaviour, health and socio-economic development

K3  the key issues in relation to environmental and social impact, equity, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and replicability in planning and managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation infrastructure

K4  the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of public health engineering and ways to integrate technical, social, economic and environmental  considerations in project planning, design, implementation, operation, maintenance and evaluation.

K5  the planning, selection, design, construction and sustainable operation and maintenance of appropriate water and environmental sanitation technologies.

K6 the range of management, social, institutional, economic and environmental issues that ensure the sustainability of water and environmental sanitation infrastructure

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

K7  effective qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis and dissemination.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to... 

PGCert:

C1  critically anlyse past and current programmes to deliver water and environmental sanitation infrastructure to unserved populations globally

C2 evaluate the needs of socially excluded groups and individuals within target populations

C3  critically appraise users’ water and environmental sanitation needs and demands based on conflicting and limited information

C4  critically appraise institutional, social, economic, environmental and technical constraints and compare possible solutions.

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

C5  develop appropriate sustainable technical options to meet users’ needs and demands for different service levels of water and environmental sanitation infrastructure

C6  investigate relevant emerging challenges facing the sector.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert:

P1  synthesize different socio-economic contexts and physical/ natural contexts

P2 select suitable laboratory tests and field surveys relating to the natural environment, social conditions, economic performance and physical condition of infrastructure

P3  choose appropriate methods to review, validate, analyse, interpret and communicate dissimilar data sets using appropriate methods.

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

P4  calculate key design parameters for various elements of appropriate water and environmental sanitation infrastructure.

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert:

T4   communicate effectively in writing, verbally and visually to disseminate quantitative and qualitative information and propose solutions

T6   demonstrate appropriate selection and use of IT.

PGDip: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

T2   listen to and record a range of views, especially from socially excluded or vulnerable groups

T3   evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of working both as a member or leader of a team and as an individual

T5   demonstrate flexible working with the constraints of limited time, resources and information by initiating, planning, organising and prioritising activities in an ethical manner

MSc: As above for PGCert and PGDip and in addition: 

T1   find and critically evaluate a variety of existing sources of data, information and knowledge where the quality and quantity of publications is limited.

 

4. Programme structure

4.1       Structure of MSc programme 

Semester 1 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP400

Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Infrastructure

15

CVP401

Assessing Water Quality and Quantity

15

CVP402

Rural Water Supply Engineering

15

 

Semester 2 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP404

Household and Communal Sanitation Engineering

15

CVP405

Appropriate Water Treatment and Distribution

15

CVP406

Appropriate Sewerage and Sewage Treatment

15

Optional Modules 

One module from

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP407

Disaster Risk Management

15

CVP408

Humanitarian Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion

15

  

Semesters 1 and 2 

Compulsory Module 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP292

Research Dissertation

60

  

4.2       Structure of Postgraduate Diploma programme 

The structure for the Postgraduate Diploma is as shown above for the MSc, but omitting study of the Research Dissertation module. 

 

4.3       Structure of Postgraduate Certificate programme 

Semester 1 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP400

Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Infrastructure

15

CVP401

Assessing Water Quality and Quantity

15

CVP402

Rural Water Supply Engineering

15

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Water Management for Development

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate are accredited by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) for student intakes in academic years up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.

The MSc is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), for student  intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title Water Management for Development
Programme code CVPT71
Length of programme MSc: 1 year full-time, Diploma: 9 months full-time, Certificate: 4 months full-time
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT71

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is for graduates who wish to develop careers in managing water and environmental sanitation services in low and middle-income countries. It aims to: 

  • provide the multidisciplinary knowledge and skills to coordinate, plan, manage and monitor water and environmental sanitation services, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries;
  • support the professionalization of the sector, through policy development, performance improvement, institutional reform, change management, benchmarking services and aiming for financial viability.
  • encourage a critical approach to the global principles and local practice of sustainable water and environmental management for the public good;
  • equip students with appropriate expertise and skills for relevant work in management of water and environmental sanitation for low- and middle-income countries; and
  • encourage critical analysis through in-depth study of a specialist topic.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

This specification has taken into account the descriptors for a qualification at Masters (MSc), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) levels that are set out in the “Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.” 

In view of the management content of this programme the Subject Benchmark Statement for Master’s Awards in Business and Management has been consulted.  The programme draws on the core competencies required for membership of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM), and the competencies for a water, sanitation and hygiene project manager published by a consortium of twelve international agencies (2017). 

In the absence of benchmark statements for Engineering MSc programmes. the Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering that applies to first degrees in engineering has been used to inform the drafting of intended learning outcomes but with the expectation that postgraduate students attain a higher level than undergraduate students in relevant outcomes. Note has also been taken of the Engineering Council document ‘The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (published May 2014) for Master Degrees other than the Integrated Masters (MEng) (Accredited as further learning to masters level, partially meeting the educational requirements for CEng)’.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

PGCert:

K1        International and local initiatives and institutions that promote water and sanitation for all.

K2        the links between water and environmental sanitation services (including water resources, water treatment and supply, excreta, wastewater, stormwater and solid waste management), hygiene behaviour, health and socio-economic development

K3        the key issues in relation to environmental and social impact, equity, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and replicability in planning and managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services

K4        the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of water and environmental sanitation and ways to integrate technical, social, economic and environmental perspectives in financing, coordinating, planning, promoting, managing, and monitoring services.

K5        the range of appropriate water and environmental sanitation technologies and the level of service they provide

K6        the assessment, planning, facilitation, regulation and management of social, institutional, economic and environmental issues at sector-wide, institutional and project implementation levels that ensure the sustainability and improvement of water and environmental sanitation services.

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

K7        effective qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis and dissemination.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert: 

C1       critically analyse past and current initiatives to deliver water and environmental sanitation services to unserved populations globally

C2       evaluate socially excluded groups and individuals within target populations

C3       critically appraise users’ water and environmental sanitation needs and demands based on conflicting and limited information

C4       critically appraise institutional, social, economic, environmental and technical constraints and review possible solutions

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

C5       justify appropriate sustainable institutional, social, economic and environmental solutions to meet users’ needs and demands for water and environmental sanitation services

C6       investigate relevant emerging challenges facing the sector.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert:

P1        synthesize  different socio-economic contexts and physical/ natural contexts

P2        plan surveys and collate suitable data sources relating to the enabling environment, sector, institutional and organisational performance, social conditions, economic performance and environmental status

P3        choose appropriate methods to review, validate, analyse, interpret and communicate dissimilar data sets using appropriate methods. 

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

P4        negotiate and defend various approaches to managing and improving water and environmental sanitation services.

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert:

T4        communicate effectively in writing, verbally and visually to an range of audiences to disseminate quantitative and qualitative information, advocate change and promote new ideas

T6        demonstrate appropriate selection and use of IT.

 PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

T2        listen to and record a range of views, especially from socially excluded or vulnerable groups

T3        evaluate  the strengths and weaknesses of working both as a member or leader of a team and as an individual

T5        demonstrate flexible working with the constraints of limited time, resources and information by initiating, planning, organising and prioritising activities in an ethical manner

MSc: As above for PGCert and PGDip and in addition: 

T1        find and critically evaluate a variety of existing sources of data, information and knowledge where the quality and quantity of publications is limited.

 

4. Programme structure

4.1       Structure of MSc programme 

Semester 1 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP410

Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Services

15

CVP411

Water and the Natural Environment

15

CVP412

Management of Village Water Services

15

  

Semester 2 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP414

Household and Communal Sanitation Management

15

CVP415

Management and Operation of Water Utilities

15

CVP416

Urban Sanitation Management

15

 

Optional Modules 

One module from 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP407

Disaster Risk Management

15

CVP408

Humanitarian Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion

15

  

Semesters 1 and 2 

Compulsory Module 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP292

Research Dissertation

60

   

4.2       Structure of Postgraduate Diploma programme 

The structure for the Postgraduate Diploma is as shown above for the MSc, but omitting study of the Research Dissertation module. 

 

4.3       Structure of Postgraduate Certificate programme 

Semester 1 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP410

Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Services

15

CVP411

Water and the Natural Environment

15

CVP412

Management of Village Water Services

15

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Sustainable Design and Construction

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award MSc (PGDip and PGCert only available as exit award)
Programme title Sustainable Design and Construction
Programme code CVPT84
Length of programme Full-time: 1 year
UCAS code
Admissions criteria
Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

A1.    To provide a high-quality educational experience that develops and sustains students’ knowledge and critical thinking of integrated sustainable design and construction solutions to address global, national and regional environmental challenges.

A2.    To provide students with skills, technologically advanced knowledge, whole- system understanding and personal competency to design, evaluate and implement sustainability, resource efficiency and circular economy solutions in construction projects.

A3.    To equip students with innovative methods and techniques to effectively use environmental assessment tools and advanced modelling to optimize sustainable project performance.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2014) Part A: Setting and Maintaining Academic Standards: The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies, QAA, Gloucester. 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Subject Benchmark Statement: Master’s Degree in Business and Management, QAA, Gloucester. 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Characteristics Statement: Master's Degree 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Subject Benchmark Statement: Engineering, QAA, Gloucester 
  • Engineering Council (2014) The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes: UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competencies, The Engineering Council 
  • The Education Framework for Masters’ Degree Programmes by the CIOB (2010) contains Learning Outcomes under the categories of Generic Outcomes, Skills, Dissertation, Construction Environment, and Construction Technology. 
  • The Global Accreditation policy and processes by the RICS (July 2018, draft v.8)

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

 On successful completion of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and understanding of: 

K1.    Principles and theories of sustainable design and construction; integrated project management methods; and processes and approaches used to manage complex projects.

K2.    Global issues in the development of sustainable design and construction strategies.

K3.    Sustainable building performance evaluation and energy efficiency approaches and methods.

K4     Managing information of sustainable building projects.

K5.    The fundamentals of research, research methods and the process of research.

K6.    Contemporary innovations in lifecycle sustainable project management, processes and techniques.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

C1.    Critically evaluate sustainable design and construction challenges.

C2.    Critically assess and evaluate the influence of different sustainability frameworks on building design and their economic and social impacts.

C3.    Independently use research and writing skills to articulate sustainability related problems and arguments and demonstrate advance knowledge in sustainable project performance.

C4.    Develop and critically appraise sustainable design and construction approaches.

C5.    Integrate knowledge of sustainable design, construction and management in building projects.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

P1.    Critically evaluate the use of low carbon tools, renewable technologies and reverse logistics in building projects.

P2.    Use a range of decision support tools and management skills to provide sustainable building solutions.

P3.    Apply the Building Research Energy Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) to construction project design and management decisions.

P4.    Critically assess the outcomes of different applied methodologies to determine the optimum attainment of sustainable building design.

P5.    Devise sustainable and circular economy strategies for buildings’ maintenance and end-of-life.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

T1.    Communicate using a variety of media to both students and staff.

T2.    Collate and critically review data and present findings.

T3.    Independently conduct research for taught modules and the dissertation.

T4.    Work effectively as a team member to achieve goals.

T5.    Effectively manage own time within a team environment.

4. Programme structure

Semester 1 

Compulsory modules (60 credits) 

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP308

Digital Buildings in a Global Design Context

15

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP322

Principles of Design and Construction

15

CVP338

Sustainable Design and Construction Theories, Principles and Assessment Tools

15

 Semester 2 

Compulsory modules (45 credits) 

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP307

Control and Commissioning for Low Energy Buildings

15

CVP309

Low Energy Building Design

15

CVP339

Integrated Sustainable Design and Construction Project

15

 Optional modules – (students should select one module)

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP324

Design Management

15

CVP326

Management of Construction Processes and Techniques

15

CVP335

Federated Building Information Modelling

15

Semester 1 and 2 and Summer Period 

Compulsory module (60 credits)

Module Code

Title

Weight

CVP332

Research Dissertation

60

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements set out in Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Water Management for Development (Distance Learning)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Chartered Institute of Water & Environmental Management (CIWEM) – MSc.

Joint Board of Moderators (JMB) - MSc

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title Water Management for Development (Distance Learning)
Programme code CVPT85
Length of programme 3-5 years
UCAS code
Admissions criteria
Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is for graduates who wish to develop careers in managing water and environmental sanitation services in low and middle-income countries. It aims to: 

  • provide the multidisciplinary knowledge and skills to coordinate, plan, manage and monitor water and environmental sanitation services, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries;
  • support the professionalization of the sector, through policy development, performance improvement, institutional reform, change management, benchmarking services and aiming for financial viability;
  • encourage a critical approach to the global principles and local practice of sustainable water and environmental management for the public good;
  • equip students with appropriate expertise and skills for relevant work in management of water and environmental sanitation for low- and middle-income countries; and
  • encourage critical analysis through in-depth study of a specialist topic.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2014) Part A: Setting and Maintaining Academic Standards: The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies, QAA, Gloucester. 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Subject Benchmark Statement: Master’s Degree in Business and Management, QAA, Gloucester. 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Characteristics Statement: Master's Degree. 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015)Subject Benchmark Statement: Engineering, QAA, Gloucester. 
  • Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) core competencies required for a water, sanitation and hygiene project manager published by a consortium of twelve international agencies.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and understanding of:

 PG Cert:

 K1     international and local initiatives and institutions that promote water and sanitation for all;

 K2     the links between water and environmental sanitation services (including water resources, water treatment and supply, excreta, wastewater, stormwater and solid waste management), hygiene behaviour, health and socio-economic development;

 K3     the key issues in relation to environmental and social impact, equity, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and replicability in planning and managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services;

 K4     the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of water and environmental sanitation and ways to integrate technical, social, economic and environmental perspectives in financing, coordinating, planning, promoting, managing, and monitoring services;

 K5     the range of appropriate water and environmental sanitation technologies and the level of service they provide; and

 K6     the assessment, planning, facilitation, regulation and management of social, institutional, economic and environmental issues at sector-wide, institutional and project implementation levels that ensure the sustainability and improvement of water and environmental sanitation services.

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition:

 K7     effective qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis and dissemination.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

PG Cert: 

C1     critically analyse past and current initiatives to deliver water and environmental sanitation services to unserved populations globally; 

C2     evaluate socially excluded groups and individuals within target populations; 

C3     critically appraise users’ water and environmental sanitation needs and demands based on conflicting and limited information; and 

C4     critically appraise institutional, social, economic, environmental and technical constraints and review possible solutions; 

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

C5     justify appropriate sustainable institutional, social, economic and environmental solutions to meet users’ needs and demands for water and environmental sanitation services; and 

C6     investigate relevant emerging challenges facing the sector.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

PG Cert: 

P1     identify whether and to what extent different socio-economic contexts align with different physical/ natural contexts; 

P2     plan surveys and collate suitable data sources relating to the enabling environment, sector, institutional and organisational performance, social conditions, economic performance and environmental status; and 

P3     choose appropriate methods to review, validate, analyse, interpret and communicate dissimilar data sets using appropriate methods. 

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

P4 negotiate and defend various approaches to managing and improving water and environmental sanitation services.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

PG Cert: 

T3     communicate effectively in writing, verbally and visually to an range of audiences to disseminate quantitative and qualitative information, advocate change and promote new ideas; 

T5     demonstrate appropriate selection and use of IT. 

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

T2     listen to and record a range of views, especially from socially excluded or vulnerable groups; 

T4     demonstrate flexible working with the constraints of limited time, resources and information by initiating, planning, organising and prioritising activities in an ethical manner; 

MSc: As above for PGCert and PGDip and in addition: 

T1     find and critically evaluate a variety of existing sources of data, information and knowledge where the quality and quantity of publications is limited;

4. Programme structure

4.1 Structure of MSc programme 

Modules will only run in the semesters identified below.  However, students have the option of specifying the number of modules taken in any given semester. 

YEAR 1: SEMESTER 1 (compulsory modules)

Mod Code

               Title

Weight

CVP430

Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Services (DL)

15

CVP432

Management of Village Water Services (DL)

15

  

 

 

Mod Code

               Title

Weight

CVP434

Household and Communal Sanitation Management (DL)

15

CVP435

Management and Operation of Water Utilities (DL)

15

  

 

 

 YEAR 2: SEMESTER 1 (compulsory modules)

Mod Code

               Title

Weight

CVP431

Water and the Natural Environment (DL)

15

CVP439

Research Methods (DL)

15

  

 

 

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP436

Urban Sanitation Management (DL)

15

 

YEAR 2: SEMESTER 2 (option module*, choose one)

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP437

Disaster Risk Management (DL)

15

CVP438

Humanitarian Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion (DL)

15

*All optional module choice is subject to availability and timetabling

 

YEAR 3: SEMESTER 1, SEMESTER 2 AND SUMMER PERIOD (compulsory module)

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP440

Research Dissertation (DL)

60

 

 

4.2  Structure of the Postgraduate Diploma programme

The structure for the Postgraduate Diploma is as shown above for the MSc but omitting study of the Research Dissertation module.

4.3  Structure of Postgraduate Certificate programme

The structure of the PG Certificate programme is shown above, comprising the Semester 1 modules in years 1 and 2. The phase in of the MSc will mean that two years is required to complete this.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements set out in Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc Construction Project Management with Building Information Modelling

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award MSc (PGDip/PGCert as exit awards only)
Programme title MSc Construction Project Management with Building Information Modelling
Programme code CVPT22 / CVPT23
Length of programme Full Time: 1 year; Part-time: typically 2 years
UCAS code
Admissions criteria
Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

A1. To provide a high quality educational experience that develops and sustains students' knowledge of building information modelling and project management in the construction industry 

A2. To facilitate the development of students’ skillset relating to construction management and modelling of built environment assets including energy efficiency and lifecycle costs 

A3. To provide the opportunity to learn how to effectively use modelling software tools.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2014) Part A: Setting and Maintaining Academic Standards: The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degree-Awarding Bodies, QAA, Gloucester. 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Subject Benchmark Statement: Master’s Degree in Business and Management, QAA, Gloucester. 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Subject Benchmark Statement: Engineering, QAA, Gloucester 
  • Engineering Council (2014) The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes: UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competencies, The Engineering Council, 
  • The Education Framework for Masters Degree Programmes by the CIOB (2010) contains Learning Outcomes under the categories of Generic Outcomes, Skills, Dissertation, Construction Environment, and Construction Technology. 
  • The Global Accreditation policy and processes by the RICS (July 2018, draft v.8) 
  • Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) (2015) Characteristics Statement: Master's Degree.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

K1. The principles of advanced design and construction and the contemporary methods and processes used to manage complex temporary multiple organisations (projects)

K2. Digital design and management of complex intelligent buildings

K3. The principles and application of advanced Information Modelling for construction project management

K4. The fundamentals of research, research methods and the processes of research

K5. Management of costs and value in construction

K6. Building performance evaluation and energy efficiency methods and approaches

K7. Professional and ethical conduct in engineering and a knowledge of professional codes of conduct.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

C1. Critically evaluate building performance demands and solutions

C2. Critically analyse disparate forms of relevant literature to inform ability to solve problems

C3. Independently use research and writing skills to articulate arguments, choices and findings from executing research

C4. Design and appraise information models of building

C5. Critically appraise design & project management approaches for construction

C6. Integrate knowledge of design & management with information modelling

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

P1. Use and apply contemporary software for modelling and management of information within projects including Employer’s Information Requirements and BIM Execution Planning

P2. Use a range of decision support tools and management skills to provide solution for projects

P3. Apply Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) to construction project designs and management decisions

P4. Collect and critically analyse information and data for advanced design and project management

P5. Synthesize relevant information to develop arguments and positions around contemporary subject specific problems and issues

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

T1. Communicate using a variety forms including reports, essays, presentations and critiques

T2. Collate and critically review data and present findings

T3. Independently conduct research

T4. Work effectively as a team member to achieve goals

T5. Explore and solve complex problems

T6. Interact and liaise effectively with staff, colleagues and industrial contacts

T7. Effectively manage own time within a team environment

4. Programme structure

Outline structure for Full-Time study

SEMESTER ONE

Compulsory modules

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP319

Research Methods (C)

15

CVP323

Principles of Project Management (C)

15

CVP320

Principles and Application of BIM (C)

15

CVP308

Digital Buildings in a Global Design Context (C)

15

 

SEMESTER TWO

Compulsory modules

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP309

Low Energy Building Design (C)

15

CVP324

Design Management (C)

15

CVP335

Federated BIM (C)

15

 Option modules* – choose one 

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP326

Management of Construction Processes and Techniques (O)

15

CVP328

Strategic Management for Construction and Engineering (O)

15

CVP329

People and Teams (O)

15

CVP330

Construction Law and Contract Management (O)

15

*All optional module choice is subject to availability and timetabling

  

SEMESTER 1, SEMESTER 2 AND SUMMER PERIOD 

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP332

Research Dissertation (C)

60

 

 

Outline structure for Part-Time Study 

YEAR 1: SEMESTER 1

Compulsory modules

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP323

Principles of Project Management (C)

15

CVP320

Principles and Application of BIM (C)

15

  

YEAR 1: SEMESTER 2

Compulsory modules

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP309

Low Energy Building Design (C)

15

CVP324

Design Management (C)

15

 

YEAR 2: SEMESTER 1

Compulsory modules

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP319

Research Methods (C)

15

CVP308

Digital Buildings in a Global Design Context (C)

15

 

 YEAR 2: SEMESTER 2

Compulsory module

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP335

Federated BIM (C)

15

 

YEAR 2: SEMESTER 2

Option module*, choose one

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP326

Management of Construction Processes and Techniques (O)

15

CVP328

Strategic Management for Construction and Engineering (O)

15

CVP329

People and Teams (O)

15

CVP330

Construction Law and Contract Management (O)

15

*All optional module choice is subject to availability and timetabling

 

YEAR 3: SEMESTER 1, SEMESTER 2 AND SUMMER PERIOD

Compulsory module

Mod Code

Title

Weight

CVP332

Research Dissertation (C)

60

 

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements set out in Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV MSc International Water and Sanitation Management

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXI (Postgraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The MSc, PG Diploma and PG Certificate are accredited by the Charted Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) for student intakes in academic years up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021.

The MSc is accredited by the Joint Board of Moderators (JBM), for student  intakes up to and including academic year 2020 – 2021, as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Final award MSc, PGDip, PGCert
Programme title Water Management for Development
Programme code CVPT71
Length of programme MSc: 1 year full-time, Diploma: 9 months full-time, Certificate: 4 months full-time
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

MSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/CVPT71

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme is for graduates who wish to develop careers in managing water and environmental sanitation services in low and middle-income countries. It aims to: 

  • provide the multidisciplinary knowledge and skills to coordinate, plan, manage and monitor water and environmental sanitation services, with a focus on low- and middle-income countries;
  • support the professionalization of the sector, through policy development, performance improvement, institutional reform, change management, benchmarking services and aiming for financial viability.
  • encourage a critical approach to the global principles and local practice of sustainable water and environmental management for the public good;
  • equip students with appropriate expertise and skills for relevant work in management of water and environmental sanitation for low- and middle-income countries; and
  • encourage critical analysis through in-depth study of a specialist topic.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

This specification has taken into account the descriptors for a qualification at Masters (MSc), Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip) and Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) levels that are set out in the “Framework for Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.” 

In view of the management content of this programme the Subject Benchmark Statement for Master’s Awards in Business and Management has been consulted.  The programme draws on the core competencies required for membership of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM), and the competencies for a water, sanitation and hygiene project manager published by a consortium of twelve international agencies (2017). 

In the absence of benchmark statements for Engineering MSc programmes. the Subject Benchmark Statement for Engineering that applies to first degrees in engineering has been used to inform the drafting of intended learning outcomes but with the expectation that postgraduate students attain a higher level than undergraduate students in relevant outcomes. Note has also been taken of the Engineering Council document ‘The Accreditation of Higher Education Programmes (published May 2014) for Master Degrees other than the Integrated Masters (MEng) (Accredited as further learning to masters level, partially meeting the educational requirements for CEng)’.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of: 

PGCert:

K1        International and local initiatives and institutions that promote water and sanitation for all.

K2        the links between water and environmental sanitation services (including water resources, water treatment and supply, excreta, wastewater, stormwater and solid waste management), hygiene behaviour, health and socio-economic development

K3        the key issues in relation to environmental and social impact, equity, effectiveness, efficiency, sustainability and replicability in planning and managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services

K4        the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of water and environmental sanitation and ways to integrate technical, social, economic and environmental perspectives in financing, coordinating, planning, promoting, managing, and monitoring services.

K5        the range of appropriate water and environmental sanitation technologies and the level of service they provide

K6        the assessment, planning, facilitation, regulation and management of social, institutional, economic and environmental issues at sector-wide, institutional and project implementation levels that ensure the sustainability and improvement of water and environmental sanitation services.

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

K7        effective qualitative and quantitative data collection, analysis and dissemination.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert: 

C1       critically analyse past and current initiatives to deliver water and environmental sanitation services to unserved populations globally

C2       evaluate socially excluded groups and individuals within target populations

C3       critically appraise users’ water and environmental sanitation needs and demands based on conflicting and limited information

C4       critically appraise institutional, social, economic, environmental and technical constraints and review possible solutions

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

C5       justify appropriate sustainable institutional, social, economic and environmental solutions to meet users’ needs and demands for water and environmental sanitation services

C6       investigate relevant emerging challenges facing the sector.

 

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert:

P1        synthesize  different socio-economic contexts and physical/ natural contexts

P2        plan surveys and collate suitable data sources relating to the enabling environment, sector, institutional and organisational performance, social conditions, economic performance and environmental status

P3        choose appropriate methods to review, validate, analyse, interpret and communicate dissimilar data sets using appropriate methods. 

PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

P4        negotiate and defend various approaches to managing and improving water and environmental sanitation services.

 

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to… 

PGCert:

T4        communicate effectively in writing, verbally and visually to an range of audiences to disseminate quantitative and qualitative information, advocate change and promote new ideas

T6        demonstrate appropriate selection and use of IT.

 PGDip and MSc: As above for PGCert and in addition: 

T2        listen to and record a range of views, especially from socially excluded or vulnerable groups

T3        evaluate  the strengths and weaknesses of working both as a member or leader of a team and as an individual

T5        demonstrate flexible working with the constraints of limited time, resources and information by initiating, planning, organising and prioritising activities in an ethical manner

MSc: As above for PGCert and PGDip and in addition: 

T1        find and critically evaluate a variety of existing sources of data, information and knowledge where the quality and quantity of publications is limited.

 

4. Programme structure

4.1       Structure of MSc programme 

Semester 1 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP410

Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Services

15

CVP411

Water and the Natural Environment

15

CVP412

Management of Village Water Services

15

  

Semester 2 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP414

Household and Communal Sanitation Management

15

CVP415

Management and Operation of Water Utilities

15

CVP416

Urban Sanitation Management

15

 

Optional Modules 

One module from 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP407

Disaster Risk Management

15

CVP408

Humanitarian Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Promotion

15

  

Semesters 1 and 2 

Compulsory Module 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP292

Research Dissertation

60

   

4.2       Structure of Postgraduate Diploma programme 

The structure for the Postgraduate Diploma is as shown above for the MSc, but omitting study of the Research Dissertation module. 

 

4.3       Structure of Postgraduate Certificate programme 

Semester 1 

Compulsory Modules 

Code

Module title

Module Weight

CVP319

Research Methods

15

CVP410

Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation Services

15

CVP411

Water and the Natural Environment

15

CVP412

Management of Village Water Services

15

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to be eligible for the award, candidates must satisfy the requirements of Regulation XXI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV PhD in Energy Resilience and the Built Environment

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXVI (Higher Degrees by Research) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award PhD, MPhil
Programme title PhD in Energy Resilience and the Built Environment
Programme code CVRP15
Length of programme 4 years full-time or up to 8 years part-time
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research-degrees/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This intensive four-year programme will train graduates to understand the complex, systemic, interdisciplinary challenges faced in achieving a resilient supply of energy to create a healthy and productive built environment. The programme will equip students with the research skills and multi-disciplinary credentials needed to be leaders in the field.

This will be achieved by immersion in a four-year PhD programme which includes a structured taught programme delivered by experts from UCL, Loughborough University and MaREI. This taught programme is supplemented by generic research skills training, and cohort-based learning comprising seminars, conferences, summer schools, workshops etc.

The programme will equip students with the state-of-the-art skills necessary to carry out their doctoral research project. The resulting PhD thesis, will provide a new contribution to knowledge, and contain original work worthy of peer-reviewed publication.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degrees

Doctoral Degree Characteristics Statement (QAA)

Credit Level Descriptors for Higher Education (SEEC)

Loughborough University Quadrennial Reviews

Research Council Mid-term Review

External Examiner Comments and Feedback

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The creation, development and implementation of a significant programme of research concerned with the built environment, its energy demands and energy supply that will lead to new knowledge disseminated through the production of a PhD thesis.

This will be supported by:

  • An understanding of the UK and European energy landscape and how energy and climate change challenges are interlinked through technical, environmental and behavioral factors.
  • The acquisition of core skills in the areas of energy flexibility and resilience, technology and system performance and comfort, health and well-being.
  • The acquisition of the research-specific skills that are needed to successfully complete the individually chosen doctoral level research programme.
  • The assimilation of the generic skills needed to conduct ethical and safe research, to critically assess research findings, to effectively communicate research outcomes, and to convince others of its importance.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

See above

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

See above

c. Key transferable skills:

See above

4. Programme structure

Students will follow an integrated, 4-year training programme shaped by three broad themes: energy flexibility and resilience; technology and system performance; and comfort, health and well-being. The programme is front loaded (Part R0) with compulsory taught courses which enable individuals from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds to understand the challenges associated with each theme. Research-specific training courses will provide thespecific skills needed to enable each student to succeed in their chosen research project. Generic skills training activities will equip students to deploy their research capabilities effectively. Each course will be delivered by academics drawn from the three partnering organisations.

The training and development undertaken in Part R0 will enable students to make an immediate start with their PhDs (Parts R1 to R3). Ongoing training in research-specific and generic skills will continue in Parts R1 and R2.

Part R0

Students will complete the following training courses.

Research-specific training courses assessed on a pass/fail/attendance basis

Students will undertake six compulsory, assessed training courses in year R0.

·         Energy resilience and the built environment

·         Energy systems: context, policy and society

·         Energy and buildings: physics and engineering

·         Socio-technical perspectives: theory and methods

·         Energy data and analysis

·         Energy and buildings modelling  

In addition, students will undertake PhD project-specific skills training R0.

Generic skills training activities assessed on an attendance basis

Participation in CDT workshops, seminars, conferences and the annual ERBE summer school and colloquium. Collaboration with industrial/stakeholder partners as appropriate.

Progression assessment

Part R0

Successful completion of the research-specific training courses and the generic skills training activities together with a pass in each of the compulsory courses with an aggregate mark that exceeds the required threshold. 

A c8000-word submission consisting of: a complete PhD research proposal, a PhD pilot study including an initial literature review.

Part R1

Research-specific training courses assessed on a pass/fail/attendance basis.

Project-specific skills training R1.

Generic skills training activities assessed on an attendance basis.

Participation in CDT workshops, seminars, conferences and the summer school and colloquium. Collaboration with industrial/stakeholder partners as appropriate.

Progression assessment

Students will complete a 2,000-word research report at the mid-way point of Part R1 and a satisfactory 10,000-word research report (end of Part report) towards the end of Part R1 in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI.

Part R2

Research-specific training courses assessed on a pass/fail/attendance basis.

Project-specific skills training R2

Generic skills training activities assessed on an attendance basis.

Participation in CDT workshops, seminars, conferences and the summer school and colloquium. Collaboration with industrial/stakeholder partners as appropriate.

Students will complete a satisfactory 10,000-word research report (end of Part report) in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI.

MPhil candidates: Submission of the MPhil thesis in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI.

Part R3

Students will submit their PhD thesis (at the end of Part R3) in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI. 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

To progress from Part R0 to Part R1, from Part R1 to Part R2 and from Part R2 to Part R3 and to be eligible for an award, candidates must satisfy the assessment requirements set out in Regulation XXVI. Candidates must complete all the requirements for each Part outlined above in order to progress to the next Part. If an end of Part report does not meet the standards required for progression, candidates may undertake further work and resubmit the report on one occasion only in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI.

The arrangements for revision of final theses which may be required are also set out in Regulation XXVI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Programme Specification

CV PhD Water and Waste Infrastructure and Services Engineered for Resilience (Water WISER)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XXVI (Higher Degrees by Research) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Architecture, Building and Civil Engineering
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award PhD, MPhil
Programme title Water and Waste Infrastructure and Services Engineered for Resilience (Water WISER)
Programme code CVRP16
Length of programme 4 years full-time, or up to 8 years part-time. The duration of the taught component is up to two years from registration.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

https://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research-degrees/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This four-year programme will train graduates to generate new knowledge about sustainable water, sanitation and waste management infrastructure and services for the poorest and most marginal people in the world. It will be delivered through unique, robust, transdisciplinary cohort-based training and support during a four-year cycle which transforms students into leaders. 

The focus of the programme is on developing the capacity to transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries, movement between disciplines will be encouraged. The programme aims to equip students with the skills to design and carry out a research project, resulting in a thesis which will provide a contribution to knowledge and contain original work worthy of publication. 

The programme will provide training in research methods appropriate to water and waste infrastructure and services, and allow students to become well acquainted with the general field of knowledge to which their research project relates. PhD research will be co-designed with and supported by industry partners and implementing agencies to ensure relevance and impact, with studentship funding including provision for up to 6 months in country placement or fieldwork.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Frameworks for Higher Education Qualifications of UK Degrees

Doctoral Degree Characteristics Statement (QAA)

Credit Level Descriptors for Higher Education (SEEC)

Loughborough University Quadrennial Reviews

Research Council mid-term review.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

At the completion of this course students will be expected to demonstrate competency and knowledge in all core engineering specialisations and a deep knowledge and understanding of at least one of these; competency and knowledge of at least 3 technical and research skill areas; and mastery of a range of professional skills including: problem solving, communication, data driven decision making, collaboration, partnerships, co-production, planning, use of ICT, data collection, data analysis, mentoring, conflict resolution, ethics in research and practice, research commercialization and securitization, entrepreneurship, marketing.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

See above

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

See above

 

c. Key transferable skills:

See above

 

4. Programme structure

Cohort training and team building – Years 1-4

To ensure cohesion within and between cohorts, and to build professional skills, a structured programme of cohort support and development will be provided through an annual cycle of events which starts on day 1. Training has two primary objectives, to build the cohort network and to develop skills. Skills development will be to broaden student capabilities and will include inter alia, team building, presentation, risk management, data management, big data handling, negotiation and conflict resolution, commercial awareness, contracting and participatory development as per the Vitae Researcher Developer Framework (2010).

It is anticipated that all currently enrolled students will be together up to five times during each year of study, hosted at a partner institution: the annual team building event (September), Challenge week (January), Summer conference (July), and Biannual professional networking typically May and November.

Part R0

Students will complete the following:

Commence consultation with potential supervisors and industry/impact partners to identify and agree on the research topic.

Up to 120 credits in modular courses during years 1 and 2 assessed in accordance with Regulation XXI which will include: A minimum of 60 credits in year one and up to 60 credits in year two.

Modules available for selection:

CVP410 Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation or CVP430 Management of Water and Environmental Sanitation (DL)

CVP411 Water and the Natural Environment

CVP412 Management of Village Water Services or CVP432 Management of Village Water Services (DL)

CVP414 Household and Communal Sanitation Management or CVP434 Household and Communal Sanitation Management

CVP415 Management and Operation of Water Utilities or CVP 435 Management and Operation of Water Utilities

CVP416 Urban Sanitation Management

CVP 430 Disaster Risk Management

CVP408 Humanitarian WASH

In the event that a student has already studied these or equivalent modules then alternative modules may be agreed at the discretion of the Programme Director. The structured training programme must be agreed by the Programme Director and agreed with the CDT management team via the Programme Director. 

Students are also required to complete the following compulsory taught level 5 research module, Water WISER Research skills training which will be taught face to face at one of the partner institutions.

Students will also complete compulsory training events; annual team building; challenge week; conference and two professional networking events.

At the end of year one the Water WISER Management Team will assess the performance of the student on the basis of the module assessment, required training and other activities. Candidates are required to pass 60 credits of taught modules and to have made substantial progress in identification of a PhD research topic, supervisory team and industry/impact partners in order to progress on the programme. Students must submit a draft research plan which will be assessed by the supervisory team and an independent reviewer at month 6. A final draft PhD research proposal, including a budget which has been agreed by the supervisory team and an independent reviewer will be submitted to the CDT management team for approval at month 12. The CDT Management board recommendation will be submitted to the School Progression Board for approval. 

Part R1

Students will complete the following:

Candidates may study up to 60 credits of taught modules (see above) 

Students will also complete compulsory training events; annual team building; challenge week; conference and two professional networking events. 

Submission of a 2,000-word research report at the mid-way point of Part 1 and submission of a satisfactory 10,000-word research report (end of Part report) towards the end of Part 1 in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI. 

Part R2 

Students will complete the following: 

PhD candidates - Submission of a satisfactory 10,000-word research report (end of Part report) towards the end of Part 2 in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI. 

MPhil candidates: Submission of their formal MPhil thesis for examination in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI. 

Part R3 

Students will complete the following: 

PhD candidates: Submission of their formal PhD thesis for examination in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI.

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

To progress from Part R0 to Part R1, from Part R1 to Part R2 and from Part R2 to Part R3 and to be eligible for an award, candidates must satisfy the assessment requirements set out in Regulation XXVI. Candidates much complete all the requirements for each Part outlined above in order to progress to the next Part. If an end of Part report does not meet the standards required for progression, candidates may undertake further work and resubmit the report on one occasion only in accordance with the provisions of Regulation XXVI.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Not applicable.

Prospective students

Information on studying at Loughborough University, including course information, facilities, and student experience.

Find out more »

1. Select programme specification
2. Save specification as a PDF
3. Print PDF