Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Accounting and Financial Management (2016-2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The programme is accredited by professional accounting bodies. Exemptions from some professional accounting examinations are available from: The Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA); The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA), The Association of International Accountants (AIA) and The Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW).

In order to qualify for the professional institutes’ examination exemptions offered to graduates from this degree, candiates must achieve minimum module marks stipulated by these bodies which, in some cases, exceed the minimum marks required for progression and degree award.  Up to date information may be obtained from the relevant professional bodies.

Final award BSc / BSc + DIS/ BSc + DInts
Programme title Accounting and Financial Management
Programme code BSUB10
Length of programme The duration of the programmes is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. In accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code NN34
Admissions criteria

BSc / BSc + DIS/ BSc + DInts - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/nn34

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Accounting, Finance and Management degree programme  aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in the accounting and financial management  professions or more general management situations.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management  as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate's chosen profession.
  • To develop a deep understanding in the areas of accounting and financial management  by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth.
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement.
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas. 

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with industry, professional firms and accounting bodies, through vocational experience in a professional placement and through accreditation by the major professional accounting bodies.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience on professional placement.
  • To allow students to examine critically and in depth the evolving nature and role of accounting and financial management theory and practice.
  • To provide a range of optional subjects in accounting, financial management and other management disciplines to complement the core of the programme and to allow students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths.
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community.
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our Accounting and Financial Management degree additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Accounting Subject Benchmark Statement
  • General Business and Management Benchmark Statement (B+M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Requirements of the professional accounting bodies

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Accounting and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (A) below.

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • Foundational disciplines of management, including economics, business mathematics and statistics;
  • Domestic and international business organisations in their technological, economic, fiscal, legal and political contexts;
  • The behaviour of people in national and international organisations;
  • The processes of management and decision making;
  • Accounting and financial management in its major contexts, including the legal and social environments, the business entity and capital markets (A) and the integral nature of the accounting function in the successful management of national and global organisations;
  • Current technical language, developments, methods, practices and issues in accounting and financial management;
  • Selected alternative techniques and practices in domestic and international accounting and financial management (A);
  • Methods of recording and summarising global and domestic economic events and preparation of financial statements (A);
  • Analytical tools for the effective financial management of  business operations (A);
  • Contemporary theories of accounting and financial management and their related research evidence (A);
  • The development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact on organisations;
  • A range of contemporary issues in management.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  •     Analyse, model and solve structured and unstructured problems (A);
  •     Evaluate and assess alternatives in complex scenarios;
  •     Gather relevant data and evidence from various sources, integrate them appropriately and reference sources adequately (A);
  •     Critically evaluate arguments and evidence (A);
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  •  Record and summarise transactions and other economic events (A);
  •  Prepare financial statements (A);
  •  Use appropriate analytical tools for accounting and financial management tasks (A);
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 i)       Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);

ii)        Learn (A) and work independently;

iii)       Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team building and project management (B&M);

iv)       Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);

 v)       Use communication and information technology appropriately in acquiring, analysing and communicating information (A);

vi)       Communicate quantitative and qualitative information, analysis, argument and conclusions using a variety of styles, in effective ways (A);

vii)      Make oral and written presentations appropriate to the audience (A).

4. Programme structure

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA013 Principles of Financial Accounting 10
BSA020 Microeconomics for Financial Studies 10
BSA025 Introduction to Law 10
BSA080/085 Quantitative Methods for Business A or B 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA014 Financial Accounting and Analysis 10
BSA019 Accounting and Finance in Context 10
BSA022 Macroeconomics for Financial Studies 10
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA110/115 Business Modelling A or B 10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and again to select one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education at entry.

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB005 Management Accounting 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB007 Financial Reporting 10
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives Fundamentals 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONS (Select TWO)  
BSB030 Marketing 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONS (Select TWO)  
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

         Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC005 Financial Reporting: Theory and Practice 10
BSC007 Management Accounting and Control Systems 10
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC009 Strategic Management Accounting and Performance 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 30 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC017 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
GROUP 2  
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms 10
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC162 Business Forecasting 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 50 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC019 Multinational Financial Management 10
BSC021 Issues in Financial Reporting 10
BSC025 Auditing (suspended 2019) 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
GROUP 2  
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Support 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134  Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 20 credits must be chosen from Group 1.  Various Semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in Semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.  

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Banking, Finance and Management (2016, 2017, 2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The programme is accredited by: The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA), The Institute of Financial Services (IFS) and the Association of Corporate Treasurers (ACT).

In order to qualify for the professional institutes’ examination exemptions offered to graduates from this degree, candidates must achieve minimum module marks stipulated by these bodies which, in some cases, exceed the minimum marks required for progression and degree award. Up to date information may be obtained from the relevant professional bodies.

Final award BSc/ BSC DPS /BSc DInts
Programme title Banking, Finance and Management
Programme code BSUB20
Length of programme The duration of the programmes is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N301
Admissions criteria

BSc/ BSC+DPS /BSc+DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n301

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Banking, Finance and Management degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding in the areas of management, banking and economics for an effective and valued career in the financial services or a related management function.

 

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

 

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of accounting, banking law and practice, economics and monetary and financial systems by pursuing them over an extended period and in depth. 
  • To develop a full range of professional skills and personal qualities beneficial for managing in finance and banking related areas. 
  • To develop a critical awareness of the dynamics of the relevant UK and international environments affecting banking and finance. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

 

Consequently the programme seeks

 

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with banks, leading financial institutions and professional bodies and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience on professional placement. 
  • To provide the opportunity for students to examine critically and in depth key issues faced by modern day bankers and financial managers. 
  • To provide a range of optional subjects that, in addition to core subjects, will enable graduates either to obtain substantial exemptions from professional examinations or to pursue more general management careers. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our Banking, Finance and Management degree additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Accounting Subject Benchmark Statement (A)
  • General Business and Management Benchmark Statement (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Requirements of the relevant professional bodies.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statements for Accounting and General Business and Management.  Those relating directly to the benchmarks are marked (A) and/or (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including economics, mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which banks and other national and international businesses operate (B&M amended);
  • the nature of domestic and global organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M);
  • integration of concepts and from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M);
  • banking and financial management in its major contexts, including the legal and social environments and the business entity and global capital markets (A amended);
  • current technical language, developments, methods, practices and issues in banking and financial management;
  • selected techniques and practices in domestic and international banking and financial management;
  • methods of recording and summarising economic events and preparation of financial statements (A);
  • analytical tools for the effective financial management of domestic and global business operations (A);
  • the sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within national and international organisations (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact on organisations (B&M);
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies for (banks) at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M) (A);
  • formulate and solve problems, both structured and unstructured,
  • advise on decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • gather relevant data and evidence from various sources, integrate them appropriately and reference sources adequately and critically evaluate arguments and evidence (A);
  • relate theory to practice in Banking, Finance and Management (B&M)
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M)
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M)
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M)
  • use credit appraisal skills and knowledge of funding options to review a wide range of business proposals from the financier's perspective
  • apply numeracy and economic modelling techniques to finance problems and phenomena (B&M amended)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA013 Principles of Financial Accounting 10
BSA020 Microeconomics for Financial Studies 10
BSA035 Introduction to Banking 10
BSA080 Quantitative Methods for Business A 10
or BSA085 Quantitative Methods for Business B 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA014 Financial Accounting and Analysis 10
BSA022 Macroeconomics for Financial Studies 10
BSA036 Banking Law and Practice 10
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA110 Business Modelling A 10
or BSA115 Business Modelling B 10

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives Fundamentals 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB030 Marketing 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB050 International Business 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB007 Financial Reporting 10
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

 

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

 

(iv)    Language Related Placement

         Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC044 Principles of Strategic Management 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC045 Strategy in Banking 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE FOUR)  
BSC017 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10 
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE FOUR)  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC019 Multinational Financial Management 10
BSC025 Auditing  (suspended 2019) 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Support 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.  

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

- to progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Banking, Finance and Management (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The programme is accredited by: The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA), The Institute of Financial Services (IFS) and the Association of Corporate Treasurers (ACT).

In order to qualify for the professional institutes’ examination exemptions offered to graduates from this degree, candidates must achieve minimum module marks stipulated by these bodies which, in some cases, exceed the minimum marks required for progression and degree award. Up to date information may be obtained from the relevant professional bodies.

Final award BSc/ BSC DPS /BSc DInts
Programme title Banking, Finance and Management
Programme code BSUB20
Length of programme The duration of the programmes is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N301
Admissions criteria

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n301

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Banking, Finance and Management degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding in the areas of management, banking and economics for an effective and valued career in the financial services or a related management function.

 

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

 

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of accounting, banking law and practice, economics and monetary and financial systems by pursuing them over an extended period and in depth. 
  • To develop a full range of professional skills and personal qualities beneficial for managing in finance and banking related areas. 
  • To develop a critical awareness of the dynamics of the relevant UK and international environments affecting banking and finance. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

 

Consequently the programme seeks

 

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with banks, leading financial institutions and professional bodies and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience on professional placement. 
  • To provide the opportunity for students to examine critically and in depth key issues faced by modern day bankers and financial managers. 
  • To provide a range of optional subjects that, in addition to core subjects, will enable graduates either to obtain substantial exemptions from professional examinations or to pursue more general management careers. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our Banking, Finance and Management degree additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Accounting Subject Benchmark Statement (A)
  • General Business and Management Benchmark Statement (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Requirements of the relevant professional bodies.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statements for Accounting and General Business and Management.  Those relating directly to the benchmarks are marked (A) and/or (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including economics, mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which banks and other businesses operate (B&M amended);
  • the nature of organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M);
  • integration of concepts and from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M);
  • banking and financial management in its major contexts, including the legal and social environments and the business entity and capital markets (A amended);
  • current technical language, developments, methods, practices and issues in banking and financial management;
  • selected techniques and practices in banking and financial management;
  • methods of recording and summarising economic events and preparation of financial statements (A);
  • analytical tools for the effective financial management of  business operations (A);
  • the sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within organisations (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact on organisations (B&M);
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies for (banks) at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M) (A);
  • formulate and solve problems, both structured and unstructured,
  • advise on decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of  alternative solutions (B&M);
  • gather relevant data and evidence from various sources, integrate them appropriately and reference sources  adequately and critically evaluate arguments and evidence (A);
  • relate theory to practice in Banking, Finance and Management (B&M)
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M)
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M)
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M)
  • use credit appraisal skills and knowledge of funding options to review a wide range of business proposals from the financier's perspective
  • apply numeracy and economic modelling techniques to finance problems and phenomena (B&M amended)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA013 Principles of Financial Accounting 10
BSA020 Microeconomics for Financial Studies 10
BSA035 Introduction to Banking 10
BSA080 Quantitative Methods for Business A 10
or BSB085 Quantitative Methods for Business B 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA014 Financial Accounting and Analysis 10
BSA022 Macroeconomics for Financial Studies 10
BSA036 Banking Law and Practice 10
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA110 Business Modelling A 10
or BSA115 Business Modelling B 10

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB030 Marketing 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB007 Financial Reporting 10
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB105 Brand Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

 

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

 

(iv)    Language Related Placement

         Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC044 Principles of Strategic Management 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC045 Strategy in Banking 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE FOUR)  
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE FOUR)  
BSC016 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Support 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134  Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location 10
Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.  

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

- to progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Banking, Finance and Management (2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The programme is accredited by: The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA), The Institute of Financial Services (IFS) and the Association of Corporate Treasurers (ACT).

In order to qualify for the professional institutes’ examination exemptions offered to graduates from this degree, candidates must achieve minimum module marks stipulated by these bodies which, in some cases, exceed the minimum marks required for progression and degree award. Up to date information may be obtained from the relevant professional bodies.

Final award BSc/ BSC DPS /BSc DInts
Programme title Banking, Finance and Management
Programme code BSUB20
Length of programme The duration of the programmes is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N301
Admissions criteria

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n301

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Banking, Finance and Management degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding in the areas of management, banking and economics for an effective and valued career in the financial services or a related management function.

 

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

 

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of accounting, banking law and practice, economics and monetary and financial systems by pursuing them over an extended period and in depth. 
  • To develop a full range of professional skills and personal qualities beneficial for managing in finance and banking related areas. 
  • To develop a critical awareness of the dynamics of the relevant UK and international environments affecting banking and finance. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

 

Consequently the programme seeks

 

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with banks, leading financial institutions and professional bodies and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience on professional placement. 
  • To provide the opportunity for students to examine critically and in depth key issues faced by modern day bankers and financial managers. 
  • To provide a range of optional subjects that, in addition to core subjects, will enable graduates either to obtain substantial exemptions from professional examinations or to pursue more general management careers. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our Banking, Finance and Management degree additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Accounting Subject Benchmark Statement (A)
  • General Business and Management Benchmark Statement (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Requirements of the relevant professional bodies.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statements for Accounting and General Business and Management.  Those relating directly to the benchmarks are marked (A) and/or (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including economics, mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which banks and other businesses operate (B&M amended);
  • the nature of organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M);
  • integration of concepts and from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M);
  • banking and financial management in its major contexts, including the legal and social environments and the business entity and capital markets (A amended);
  • current technical language, developments, methods, practices and issues in banking and financial management;
  • selected techniques and practices in banking and financial management;
  • methods of recording and summarising economic events and preparation of financial statements (A);
  • analytical tools for the effective financial management of  business operations (A);
  • the sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within organisations (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact on organisations (B&M);
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies for (banks) at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M) (A);
  • formulate and solve problems, both structured and unstructured,
  • advise on decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of  alternative solutions (B&M);
  • gather relevant data and evidence from various sources, integrate them appropriately and reference sources  adequately and critically evaluate arguments and evidence (A);
  • relate theory to practice in Banking, Finance and Management (B&M)
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M)
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M)
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M)
  • use credit appraisal skills and knowledge of funding options to review a wide range of business proposals from the financier's perspective
  • apply numeracy and economic modelling techniques to finance problems and phenomena (B&M amended)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

          Semester 1

i)       COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 60)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSA005

Organisational Behaviour

10

BSA007

Skills for Study, Placement and Employment

(weight 20)     continued in Semester 2

10

BSA017

Financial Accounting

20

BSA035

Introduction to Banking

10

BSA080

Quantitative Methods for Business A

10

 

Or

 

BSA085

Quantitative Methods for Business B

10

             Semester 2

 i)       COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 60)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSA007

Skills for Study, Placement and Employment

(weight 20)     continued from Semester 1

10

BSA022

Macroeconomics for Financial Studies

10

BSA036

Banking Law and Practice

10

BSA060

Microeconomics for Busines

10

BSA110

Business Modelling A

20

 

Or

 

BSA115

Business Modelling B

20

 

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB030 Marketing 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB120 Decision Making Analysis 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB007 Financial Reporting 10
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB086 International Employment Relations 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB105 Brand Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

 

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

 

(iv)    Language Related Placement

         Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC044 Principles of Strategic Management 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC045 Strategy in Banking 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE FOUR)  
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE FOUR)  
BSC016 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC025 Auditing 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Support 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134  Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC150 Business Ethics 10
BSC175 Retail Location 10
Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.  

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

- to progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Finance and Management (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/ BSc DPS /BSc DInts
Programme title Finance and Management
Programme code BSUB22
Length of programme The duration of the programmes is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies. In accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria
Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Finance and Management degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding in the areas of finance, financial markets, economics, financial accounting and management for an effective and valued career in financial services or a related management function.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to help students:

In Finance:

  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of finance theory and its application; national and international financial markets; ethics; economics and financial systems; and financial accounting, by pursuing them over an extended period and in depth. 
  • To develop a critical awareness of the dynamics of the national and international environments affecting finance; financial markets and regulation; and financial reporting. 
  • To develop a full range of professional skills and personal qualities useful for managing in finance and financial institutions. 

In Management:

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession.
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving and through individual experiences. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

 Consequently the programme seeks to:

  • provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated international programme through close links with leading financial institutions and professional bodies and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience. 
  • provide the opportunity for students to examine critically and in depth key issues faced by finance professionals and financial managers including ethical concerns. 
  • provide a range of optional subjects that, in addition to core subjects, will enable graduates to pursue more general management careers. 
  • develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • enhance the employability of our graduates.

 The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our Finance and Management degree additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • Finance Subject Benchmark Statement (F)
  • General Business and Management Benchmark Statement (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Requirements of the relevant professional bodies.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statements for Finance and General Business and Management.  Those relating directly to the benchmarks are marked (F) and/or (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate relevant knowledge and understanding of:

K1: Foundational disciplines of management, including economics, business mathematics and statistics;

K2: Business organisations in their technological, economic, fiscal, legal and political contexts (B&M);

K3: The behaviour of people in organisations (B&M);

K4: The processes of management and decision making (B&M);

K5: The contexts in which finance plays a part, including an understanding of the roles, operation and functions of domestic and international financial markets and financial institutions and ethical considerations (F)

K6: The major theoretical tools and theories of finance, their relevance and application to theoretical and practical problems and application of this knowledge to the appraisal of empirical evidence. (F)

K7: The structures, financing arrangements and governance mechanisms of business organisations, and an appreciation of how theory and evidence can be combined to assess the effectiveness and efficiency of such arrangements and the factors affecting investment decisions. (F)

K8: The interpretation of financial reports from accounting statements prepared following international accounting standards and data generated in financial markets (F)

K9: Analytical tools for the effective financial management of single-market and international business operations (F);

K10: Contemporary theories of finance and financial management and their related research evidence (F);

K11: The development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact on organisations (B&M);

K12: A range of contemporary issues in international management (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1:  analyse and solve theoretical and practical problems in single-market and international finance;

C2:  synthesise important issues and themes from the professional and academic literature in finance;

C3:  critically evaluate arguments and evidence related to finance and ethical issues;

C4:  critically evaluate arguments and evidence related to investment practice and treasury management;

C5:  interpret financial statements.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

P1:  prepare and interpret financial reports suitable for a professional audience;

P2:  collect and analyse relevant financial data using appropriate techniques;

P3:  use appropriate analytical and professional tools in complex financial scenarios.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1: Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness;

T2: Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development;

T3: Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution;

T4: Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;

T5: Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;

T6: Learn and work independently;

T7: Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques;

T8: Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing;

T9: Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently;

T10: Work well in an international team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management.

4. Programme structure

4.1      Part A Introductory Modules

SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Subject Title

Modular Weight

BSA007

Skills for Study, Placement and Employment

20

SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES

BSA005

Organisational Behaviour

10

BSA013

Principles of Financial Accounting

10

BSA020

Microeconomics for Financial Studies

10

BSA025

Introduction to Law

10

BSA080/085

Quantitative Methods for Business A or B

10

SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES

BSA014

Financial Accounting and Analysis

10

BSA019

Finance and Accounting in Context

10

BSA022

Macroeconomics for Financial Studies

10

BSA053

Organisations in the International Context

10

BSA110/115

Business Modelling A or B

10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and again to one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education at entry.

4.2      Part B Degree Modules

SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES

Code

Subject Title

Modular Weight

ECB015

Economics of the Financial System

20

SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES 

Code         

Subject Title

Modular Weight

BSB010

Business Information Management

10

BSB025

Financial Management

10

BSB120

Management Science Methods

10

BSBxxx

Ethics in Finance and Accounting

10

SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES 

BSBxxx

Corporate Finance

10

BSB027

Financial Markets and Derivatives Fundamentals

10

BSB070

Accounting for Management Decisions

10

BSB110

Data Analysis for Management

10

 Semester 1 Options (Choose ONE)

BSB030

Marketing

10

BSB040

Human Resource Management

10

BSB050

International Business

10

 

 Semester 2 Options (Choose ONE)

BSB007

Financial Reporting

10

BSB012

Information Systems Development

10

BSB024

International Economics

10

BSB046

Organisation Studies

10

BSB052

International Management

10

BSB100

Operations Management

10

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4      Part C Degree Modules

Note: Students must take modules giving 120 credits in total for the year of which 60 credits must be taken in each semester, at least 20 credits must come from Group 1 modules and no more than 60 credits from Group 2 modules.

SEMESTER 1

COMPULSORY MODULES 

Code         

Subject Title

Modular Weight

BSCxxx

Portfolio Management

20

GROUP 1 MODULES 

BSC017

Financial Risk Management

10

BSC020

Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround

10

BSC030

Corporate Governance

10

BSC051

International Corporate Governance and Firms

10

GROUP 2 MODULES

BSC063

Decision and Efficiency Analysis

10

BSC097

Knowledge Management (suspended 2019)

10

BSC100

Advanced Interpersonal Skills

10

BSC130

Business Programming

10

BSC132

Small Business Issues

10

BSC165

Business Forecasting

10

SEMESTER 2

COMPULSORY MODULES 

BSCxxx

Financial Trading

20

GROUP 1 MODULES

BSC018

Behavioural Finance

10

BSC019

Multinational Financial Management

10

GROUP 2 MODULES

BSC025

Auditing (suspended 2019)

10

BSC059

Business and Entrepreneurialism

10

BSC064

Business Optimisation

10

BSC067

Business Simulation for Decision Support

10

BSC068

Consulting for Decision Making

10

BSC085

The Changing Work Organisation

10

BSC134 

Business Planning for New Ventures

10

BSC144

Project Management

10

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Please check choices carefully.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

- to progress from Part B to Part I, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

 

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Information Management and Business (2016-2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/ BSc+DPS
Programme title Information Management and Business
Programme code BSUB25
Length of programme The programme is available on a full-time basis. The duration of the programme is 6 semesters, or 8 semesters if students undertake a placement leading to the award of a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) which takes place between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code PN11 (three years) or PNC1 (four years)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/pn11

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/pnc1

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Information Management and Business degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations, especially those requiring sophisticated management of knowledge and information.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students:

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism.
  • To develop a deep understanding of the importance of information management and its role in effective decision making in organisations.
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience and optionally on placement.
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks:

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with a wide variety of business organisations.
  • To demonstrate the importance of information management and information literacy to a wide variety of business organisations.
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme.
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of a wide variety of business organisations.
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA: Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.   the cultural, ethical, political and social issues surrounding the use of information at an organisational level and within society and the external environment (LIM, GBM)

K2.   information systems - the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (GBM)

K3.   the changing needs of users of existing and potential information services in a global technology rich environment (LIM)

K4.   the principles of strategic management, marketing and planning and development of people within national and international organisations (GBM)

K5.   professional, legal, moral and ethical considerations in the computing and information industries including issues such as data protection, the valuation of intellectual property, freedom of information etc. (LIM and GBM)

K6.   a variety of sources of information through a range of physical and virtual channels, media and formats (LIM)

K7.   pervasive issues such as sustainability, globalisation, corporate social responsibility, diversity, business innovation, creativity, enterprise development, knowledge management and risk management (GBM) 

K8.   human information behaviour and information seeking processes and information retrieval systems (LIM)

K9.   appropriate frameworks, standards and systems for the description, classification and indexing of information and knowledge containers and content (LIM)

K10. organisations, the external environment in which they operate and how they are managed both domestically and globally (GBM)

K11. the internal aspects, functions and processes of organisations and their purpose, structures, governance, operations and management (GBM)

K12. different types of organisations that produce, disseminate and store information and their place in the information chain (LIM)

K13. policies and procedures that apply to the creation, capture, storage, dissemination, retrieval and destruction of information to ensure compliance with regulatory frameworks (LIM)

K14. the design, development and delivery of information products, systems and services to match customer requirements (LIM)

K15. processes, procedures and practices for effective management of national and international organisations (GBM)

K16. the concepts, principles and techniques underpinning key aspects of planning, managing and leading services, including financial management, human resource management, project management, marketing, service quality, customer relationship management and change management  (GBM)

K17. the principles and capacities of information and communication technologies and their application in professional practice.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

C1.    demonstrate a range of cognitive and intellectual skills together with techniques specific to business and management such as critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, including the ability to relate and marshal facts, ideas and theories in a well-structured argument (LIM)

C2.    self reflect critically, demonstrating self awareness, openness and sensitivity to diversity in terms of people, cultures, business and management issues; acquire the skills of learning to learn and developing a continuing appetite for learning; reflective, adaptive and collaborative learning (LIM)

C3.    apply subject knowledge and understanding critically and effectively to real world situations (LIM)

C4.    plan effective strategies for searching and handling information, in both printed and electronic formats

C5.    apply qualitative and quantitative research methods and their application in practice. (LIM)

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

P1.    demonstrate effective use of information and communication technologies and their application in the management of information (LIM)

P2.     specify, design and construct information services and computer-based systems according to users’ needs including identifying, formulating and solving business problems (LIM and GBM)

P3.     carry out effective problem solving and decision making using appropriate quantitative and qualitative skills (LIM and GBM)

P4.     apply the concepts, principles and techniques of strategic management in real world situations (LIM)

P5.     use a range of electronic information resources and systems including databases, search engines and portals (LIM)

P6.     conduct research into business and information management issues (GBM)

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

T1.     make effective use of communication and information technology, for example create and manipulate documents and databases using appropriate software (LIM and GBM)

T2.    use numeracy and quantitative skills including data analysis, interpretation and extrapolation and present information in numerical and statistical form using appropriate software (LIM and GBM)

T3.     apply critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, evaluation and manage and reflect on their own learning (LIM and GBM)

T4.     show interpersonal skills of effective listening, negotiating, persuasion and presentation and communicate effectively orally and in writing using a range of media for different purposes and audiences (LIM and GBM)

T5.     demonstrate effective self-management in terms of time, planning and behaviour (LIM and GBM)

T6.     achieve effective performance, within a team environment, including leadership, team building, influencing and project management skills in various contexts (LIM and GBM)

T7.     appreciate the need for continuing professional development and manage their own lifelong learning (LIM and GBM)

T8.     demonstrate skills of critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, including the ability to relate data, facts, ideas and theories into a well-structured argument (LIM and GBM)

4. Programme structure

4.1 Part A Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULE  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Reporting 10
BSA080/085 Quantitative Methods for Business A or B 10
ISA410 Information in Society 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10
BSA110/115 Business Modelling A or B 10
ISA411 Intelligent Organisations 10
ISA413 Agile Data Management 10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and again to one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education at entry.

 

4.2 Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
ISB411 Knowledge, Data and Information Systems 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
ISB412 Digital Resilience 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB050 International Business 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives Fundamentals 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10
BSB590 The Contemporary Business Environment 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

 

4.3 Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programmes which include professional training will be registered for module BSI001 Placement. They will undertake a placement of minimum 48 weeks during the year between Part B and Part C which will lead to the qualification of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) on successful completion of the required assessments for BSI001 and of the degree programme requirements.

4.4 Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC055 Global Strategic Management 20
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10

SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES
with a total credit weighting of 40 from the approved list of options

 
GROUP 1*  
ISC002 Information Management Project (weight 30) continued in Semester 2 10/20
ISC027 Information and Knowledge Management 10
ISC200 Information Architecture 10
ISC336 Social Informatics 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC017 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms 10
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES
with a total credit weighting of 30 from the approved list of options

 
GROUP 1*  
ISC002 Information Management Project (weight 30) continued in Semester 2 20/10
ISC334 Intelligent Project Management 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
GROUP 2  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Support 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
BSC575 Leadership and Interpersonal Skills 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 10 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have pre-requisite modules.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

- to progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Information Management and Business (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/ BSc+DPS
Programme title Information Management and Business
Programme code BSUB25
Length of programme The programme is available on a full-time basis. The duration of the programme is 6 semesters, or 8 semesters if students undertake a placement leading to the award of a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) which takes place between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code PN11 (three years) or PNC1 (four years)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/pn11

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/pnc1

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Information Management and Business degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations, especially those requiring sophisticated management of knowledge and information.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students:

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism.
  • To develop a deep understanding of the importance of information management and its role in effective decision making in organisations.
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience and optionally on placement.
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks:

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with a wide variety of business organisations.
  • To demonstrate the importance of information management and information literacy to a wide variety of business organisations.
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme.
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of a wide variety of business organisations.
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA: Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.   the cultural, ethical, political and social issues surrounding the use of information at an organisational level and within society and the external environment (LIM, GBM)

K2.   information systems - the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (GBM)

K3.   the changing needs of users of existing and potential information services in a global technology rich environment (LIM)

K4.   the principles of strategic management, marketing and planning and development of people within organisations (GBM)

K5.   professional, legal, moral and ethical considerations in the computing and information industries including issues such as data protection, the valuation of intellectual property, freedom of information etc. (LIM and GBM)

K6.   a variety of sources of information through a range of physical and virtual channels, media and formats (LIM)

K7.   pervasive issues such as sustainability, globalisation, corporate social responsibility, diversity, business innovation, creativity, enterprise development, knowledge management and risk management (GBM) 

K8.   human information behaviour and information seeking processes and information retrieval systems (LIM)

K9.   appropriate frameworks, standards and systems for the description, classification and indexing of information and knowledge containers and content (LIM)

K10. organisations, the external environment in which they operate and how they are managed (GBM)

K11. the internal aspects, functions and processes of organisations and their purpose, structures, governance, operations and management (GBM)

K12. different types of organisations that produce, disseminate and store information and their place in the information chain (LIM)

K13. policies and procedures that apply to the creation, capture, storage, dissemination, retrieval and destruction of information to ensure compliance with regulatory frameworks (LIM)

K14. the design, development and delivery of information products, systems and services to match customer requirements (LIM)

K15. processes, procedures and practices for effective management of organisations (GBM)

K16. the concepts, principles and techniques underpinning key aspects of planning, managing and leading services, including financial management, human resource management, project management, marketing, service quality, customer relationship management and change management  (GBM)

K17. the principles and capacities of information and communication technologies and their application in professional practice.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

C1.    demonstrate a range of cognitive and intellectual skills together with techniques specific to business and management such as critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, including the ability to relate and marshal facts, ideas and theories in a well-structured argument (LIM)

C2.    self reflect critically, demonstrating self awareness, openness and sensitivity to diversity in terms of people, cultures, business and management issues; acquire the skills of learning to learn and developing a continuing appetite for learning; reflective, adaptive and collaborative learning (LIM)

C3.    apply subject knowledge and understanding critically and effectively to real world situations (LIM)

C4.    plan effective strategies for searching and handling information, in both printed and electronic formats

C5.    apply qualitative and quantitative research methods and their application in practice. (LIM)

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

P1.    demonstrate effective use of information and communication technologies and their application in the management  of information (LIM)

P2.     specify, design and construct information services and computer-based systems according to users’ needs including identifying, formulating and solving business problems (LIM and GBM)

P3.     carry out effective problem solving and decision making using appropriate quantitative and qualitative skills (LIM and GBM)

P4.     apply the concepts, principles and techniques of strategic management in real world situations (LIM)

P5.     use a range of electronic information resources and systems including databases, search engines and portals (LIM)

P6.     conduct research into business and information management issues (GBM)

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

T1.     make effective use of communication and information technology, for example create and manipulate documents and databases using appropriate software (LIM and GBM)

T2.    use numeracy and quantitative skills including data analysis, interpretation and extrapolation and present information in numerical and statistical form using appropriate software (LIM and GBM)

T3.     apply critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, evaluation and manage and reflect on their own learning (LIM and GBM)

T4.     show interpersonal skills of effective listening, negotiating, persuasion and presentation and communicate effectively orally and in writing using a range of media for different purposes and audiences (LIM and GBM)

T5.     demonstrate effective self-management in terms of time, planning and behaviour (LIM and GBM)

T6.     achieve effective performance, within a team environment, including leadership, team building, influencing and project management skills in various contexts (LIM and GBM)

T7.     appreciate the need for continuing professional development and manage their own lifelong learning (LIM and GBM)

T8.     demonstrate skills of critical thinking, analysis and synthesis, including the ability to relate data, facts, ideas and theories into a well-structured argument (LIM and GBM)

4. Programme structure

4.1 Part A Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULE  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
BSA570 Quantitative Methods for Business 10
ISA410 Knowledge, Data and Information in Society 10
COA102 Web Design 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA526 Accounting for Managers 10
BSA572 Statistics & Modelling for Management 10
ISA411 Knowledge, Data and Information in Organisations 10
ISA413 Information & Knowledge Organisation and Retrieval 10

4.2 Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB560 Principles of Marketing 10
ISB410 People Centred Information Services 10
ISB411 Knowledge, Data and Information Systems 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB562 The Marketing Mix 10
BSB572 Management Science Methods 10
ISB412 Digital Resilience 20
ISB413 Research Methods 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
ISB301 Systems Thinking 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10
BSB590 The Contemporary Business Environment 10

 

4.3 Part I - Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programmes which include professional training will be registered for module BSI001 Placement. They will undertake a placement of minimum 48 weeks during the year between Part B and Part C which will lead to the qualification of Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) on successful completion of the required assessments for BSI001 and of the degree programme requirements.

4.4 Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULE  
BSC570 Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC575 Leadership & Interpersonal Skills 10

SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES
with a total credit weighting of 40 from the approved list of modules*

 
GROUP 1  
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
ISC002 Information Management Project (weight 30) continued in Semester 2 10/20
ISC027 Information and Knowledge Management 10
ISC200 Information Architecture 10
ISC336 Social Informatics 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms 10
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC522 Entrepreneurship and Innovation 10

SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES
with a total credit weighting of 40 from the approved list of modules*

 
GROUP 1  
ISC002 Information Management Project (weight 30) continued in Semester 2 20/10
ISC334 Intelligent Project Management 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
GROUP 2  
BSC016 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Making 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC080 Analyising Careers 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC524 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 40 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have pre-requisite modules.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

- to progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) International Business (2016-2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc /BSc DPS/BSc DIntS
Programme title International Business
Programme code BSUB30
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N110
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n110

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The International Business degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations including those requiring international understanding and cultural competence.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism. 
  • To develop a global outlook to face effectively the managerial and organisational challenges of a globalized economy. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of particular interest by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To offer international perspectives on business and management through teaching and learning and through close links with international partner universities. 
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the international business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at LoughboroughUniversity is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims and offers graduates of our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General Business and Management (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including economics, mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which business operates, both domestically and internationally (B&M);
  • integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M);
  • the process of management and differing international styles of management (B&M);
  • concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills relevant to solving problems in both national and international business contexts;
  • the nature of organisations and the behaviour of people within international firms, both individually and working in groups (B&M);
  • pervasive issues which impact on international firms and international business, including: globalisation, diversity and cultural issues (B&M);
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation, international marketing and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in intenational firms (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • the development of appropriate policies and strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management (B&M).      
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • use effective communication, both oral and written, in a range of styles and media appropriate for management in different cultures (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M);
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M);
  • create, evaluate and assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources (B&M);
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • understand and be sensitive to different cultures, including the ability to work effectively in other cultures (B&M);
  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Reporting 10
BSA080/085 Quantitative Methods for Business A or B 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10
BSA110/115 Business Modelling A or B 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA050 Introduction to Management 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA052 Sociology of Work 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and again to one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education at entry.

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB137 Data Analysis for Marketing Decisions 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives Fundamentals 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits, as required by the School of Business and Economics.  Students who select this option must ensure that they have taken a total of 60 credits in Semester One.

 

4.3    Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4    Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC055 Global Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE THREE)  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC017 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
ISC027 Information and Knowledge Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE THREE)  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.  

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

 

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) International Business (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc /BSc DPS/BSc DIntS
Programme title International Business
Programme code BSUB30
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N110
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n110

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The International Business degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations including those requiring international understanding and cultural competence.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism. 
  • To develop a global outlook to face effectively the managerial and organisational challenges of a globalized economy. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of particular interest by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To offer international perspectives on business and management through teaching and learning and through close links with international partner universities. 
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the international business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at LoughboroughUniversity is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims and offers graduates of our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General Business and Management (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including economics, mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which business operates (B&M);
  • integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M);
  • the process of management and differing international styles of management (B&M);
  • concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills relevant to solving problems in both national and international business contexts;
  • the nature of organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M);
  • pervasive issues which impact on international firms and international business, including: globalisation, diversity and cultural issues (B&M);
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in both the manufacturing and service industries (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • the development of appropriate policies and strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management (B&M).      
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • use effective communication, both oral and written, in a range of styles and media appropriate for management in different cultures (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M);
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M);
  • create, evaluate and assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources (B&M);
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • understand and be sensitive to different cultures, including the ability to work effectively in other cultures (B&M);
  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Framework 10

BSA080 Quantitative Methods for Business Aor BSA085 Quantitative Methods for Business B

10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10

BSA110 Business Modelling Aor BSA115 Business Modelling B

10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA035 Introduction to Banking 10
BSA050 Introduction to Management 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA036 Banking Law and Practice 10
BSA052 Sociology of Work 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB137 Data Analysis for Marketing Decisions 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB105 Brand Management 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits, as required by the School of Business and Economics.  Students who select this option must ensure that they have taken a total of 60 credits in Semester One.

 

4.3    Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4    Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC055 Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE THREE)  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE THREE)  
BSC016 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.  

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

 

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) International Business (2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc /BSc DPS/BSc DIntS
Programme title International Business
Programme code BSUB30
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N110
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n110

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The International Business degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations including those requiring international understanding and cultural competence.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism. 
  • To develop a global outlook to face effectively the managerial and organisational challenges of a globalized economy. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of particular interest by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To offer international perspectives on business and management through teaching and learning and through close links with international partner universities. 
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the international business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at LoughboroughUniversity is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims and offers graduates of our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General Business and Management (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including economics, mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which business operates (B&M);
  • integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M);
  • the process of management and differing international styles of management (B&M);
  • concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills relevant to solving problems in both national and international business contexts;
  • the nature of organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M);
  • pervasive issues which impact on international firms and international business, including: globalisation, diversity and cultural issues (B&M);
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in both the manufacturing and service industries (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • the development of appropriate policies and strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management (B&M).      
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • use effective communication, both oral and written, in a range of styles and media appropriate for management in different cultures (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M);
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M);
  • create, evaluate and assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources (B&M);
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • understand and be sensitive to different cultures, including the ability to work effectively in other cultures (B&M);
  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Framework 10

BSA080 Quantitative Methods for Business Aor BSA085 Quantitative Methods for Business B

10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10

BSA110 Business Modelling Aor BSA115 Business Modelling B

10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA035 Introduction to Banking 10
BSA050 Introduction to Management 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA036 Banking Law and Practice 10
BSA052 Sociology of Work 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB137 Data Analysis for Marketing Decisions 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB086 International Employment Relations 10
BSB105 Brand Management 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits, as required by the School of Business and Economics.  Students who select this option must ensure that they have taken a total of 60 credits in Semester One.

 

4.3    Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4    Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC055 Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE THREE)  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE THREE)  
BSC016 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.  

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

 

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Management Sciences (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Management Sciences
Programme code BSUB40
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N201
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n201

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Management Sciences degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations including those requiring quantitative approaches, analytical techniques and significant IT skills.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism. 
  • To develop a comprehensive understanding of the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop skills in the choice, application, interpretation and implementation of industry standard and bespoke software packages required to meet the needs of the modern data-driven business environment. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of particular interest by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with a dynamic learning environment showing the importance and relevance of numeracy and computing skills in meeting the needs of successful modern organisations. 
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims and offers graduates of our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General Business and Management (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas

  • Foundational disciplines of business and management including economics, business mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions both domestically and globally (B&M);
  • Key areas of the technological, economic, fiscal, legal, and political contexts in which  domestic and international business operates (B&M, altered);
  • The behaviour of people in both national and international organisations;
  • The processes of management and decision making;
  • Familiarity with a range of business data, research sources and appropriate methodologies (B&M, altered);
  • The development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M, altered);
  • The sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • The management and development of people within domestic and global organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in both the manufacturing and service industries (B&M, altered);
  • The development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (B&M);
  • The key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M, altered);
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M, altered);
  • Modelling and analytical techniques in management including their strengths and weaknesses and appropriateness;
  • Appropriate packages for modelling and decision making in domestic and international organisations;
  • A range of contemporary issues impacting on various areas of management.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management(B&M).
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • Make effective use of a wide range of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including the selection of  appropriate software for various tasks (B&M);
  • Conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the Internet (B&M);
  • Create, evaluate and assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources (B&M);
  • Apply highly developed numerical skills and sophisticated quantitative skills including data analysis, interpretation and extrapolation to business problems (B&M);
  • Create, exploit and apply quantitative models to domestic and global business problems and phenomena (B&M);
  • Perform effectively within a team environment, displaying effective team-working skills including leaderships, team-building and project management skills (B&M)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Reporting 10

BSA080/085 Quantitative Methods for Business A or B

10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10

BSA110/115 Business Modelling A or B

10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA050 Introduction to Management 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA052 Sociology of Work 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and again to one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education at entry.

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (SELECT THREE)  
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB050 International Business 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (SELECT TWO)  
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives Fundamentals 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economicsapproved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC055 Global Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 60 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC017 Financial Risk Management  
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
ISC027 Informational and Knowledge Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 40 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Support 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
GROUP 2  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 20 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Management Sciences (2016, 2017 and 2018 intake)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Management Sciences
Programme code BSUB40
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N201
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n201

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Management Sciences degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations including those requiring quantitative approaches, analytical techniques and significant IT skills.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism. 
  • To develop a comprehensive understanding of the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop skills in the choice, application, interpretation and implementation of industry standard and bespoke software packages required to meet the needs of the modern data-driven business environment. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of particular interest by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with a dynamic learning environment showing the importance and relevance of numeracy and computing skills in meeting the needs of successful modern organisations. 
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims and offers graduates of our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General Business and Management (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas

  • Foundational disciplines of business and management including economics, business mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions both domestically and globally (B&M);
  • Key areas of the technological, economic, fiscal, legal, and political contexts in which  domestic and international business operates (B&M, altered);
  • The behaviour of people in both national and international organisations;
  • The processes of management and decision making;
  • Familiarity with a range of business data, research sources and appropriate methodologies (B&M, altered);
  • The development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M, altered);
  • The sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • The management and development of people within domestic and global organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in both the manufacturing and service industries (B&M, altered);
  • The development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (B&M);
  • The key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M, altered);
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M, altered);
  • Modelling and analytical techniques in management including their strengths and weaknesses and appropriateness;
  • Appropriate packages for modelling and decision making in domestic and international organisations;
  • A range of contemporary issues impacting on various areas of management.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management(B&M).
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • Make effective use of a wide range of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including the selection of  appropriate software for various tasks (B&M);
  • Conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the Internet (B&M);
  • Create, evaluate and assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources (B&M);
  • Apply highly developed numerical skills and sophisticated quantitative skills including data analysis, interpretation and extrapolation to business problems (B&M);
  • Create, exploit and apply quantitative models to domestic and global business problems and phenomena (B&M);
  • Perform effectively within a team environment, displaying effective team-working skills including leaderships, team-building and project management skills (B&M)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Reporting 10

BSA080/085 Quantitative Methods for Business A or B

10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10

BSA110/115 Business Modelling A or B

10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA050 Introduction to Management 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA052 Sociology of Work 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and again to one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education at entry.

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (SELECT THREE)  
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB050 International Business 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (SELECT TWO)  
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives Fundamentals 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits, as required by the School of Business and Economics.  Students who select this option must ensure that they have taken a total of 60 credits in Semester One.

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economicsapproved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC055 Global Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 60 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC017 Financial Risk Management  
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
ISC027 Informational and Knowledge Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 40 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Support 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
GROUP 2  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 20 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Management Sciences (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Management Sciences
Programme code BSUB40
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code N201
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/n201

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Management Sciences degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations including those requiring quantitative approaches, analytical techniques and significant IT skills.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduate’s chosen profession or management specialism. 
  • To develop a comprehensive understanding of the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop skills in the choice, application, interpretation and implementation of industry standard and bespoke software packages required to meet the needs of the modern data-driven business environment. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in areas of particular interest by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with a dynamic learning environment showing the importance and relevance of numeracy and computing skills in meeting the needs of successful modern organisations. 
  • To provide students with a flexible learning environment allowing students to explore and develop their own interests and strengths as they progress through the programme. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims and offers graduates of our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills. 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General Business and Management (B&M)
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas

  • Foundational disciplines of business and management including economics, business mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • Key areas of the technological, economic, fiscal, legal, and political contexts in which business operates (B&M, altered);
  • The behaviour of people in organisations;
  • The processes of management and decision making;
  • Familiarity with a range of business data, research sources and appropriate methodologies (B&M, altered);
  • The development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M, altered);
  • The sources, uses and management of finance, the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • The management and development of people within organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in both the manufacturing and service industries (B&M, altered);
  • The development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon organisations (B&M);
  • The key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M, altered);
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M, altered);
  • Modelling and analytical techniques in management including their strengths and weaknesses and appropriateness;
  • Appropriate packages for modelling and decision making in management;
  • A range of contemporary issues impacting on various areas of management.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management(B&M).
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • Make effective use of a wide range of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including the selection of  appropriate software for various tasks (B&M);
  • Conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the Internet (B&M);
  • Create, evaluate and assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources (B&M);
  • Apply highly developed numerical skills and sophisticated quantitative skills including data analysis, interpretation and extrapolation to business problems (B&M);
  • Create, exploit and apply quantitative models to business problems and phenomena (B&M);
  • Perform effectively within a team environment, displaying effective team-working skills including leaderships, team-building and project management skills(B&M)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Framework 10

BSA080 Quantitative Methods for Business A

or BSA085 Quantitative Methods for Business B

10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10

BSA110 Business Modelling A

or BSA115 Business Modelling B

10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA035 Introduction to Banking 10
BSA050 Introduction to Management 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA036 Banking Law and Practice 10
BSA052 Sociology of Work 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB100 Operations Management 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB105 Brand Management 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (SELECT TWO)  
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB050 International Business 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (SELECT TWO)  
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB067 Business Lending 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits, as required by the School of Business and Economics.  Students who select this option must ensure that they have taken a total of 60 credits in Semester One.

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economicsapproved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC055 Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 50 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC063 Decision and Efficiency Analysis 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 40 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC064 Business Optimisation 10
BSC067 Simulation for Decision Making 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
GROUP 2  
BSC016 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 20 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Retailing, Marketing and Management (2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Retailing, Marketing and Management
Programme code BSUB50
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code NN25
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/nn25

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Retailing, Marketing and Management degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in retail management, marketing or other similar management situations.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training, particularly in the areas of retailing and marketing. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in the areas of retailing and marketing by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience on professional placement. 
  • To provide students with deep insight into retailing and management through the use of a wide variety of case studies. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General and Business Management
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including marketing, economics, business mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main domestic and global business and management functions (B&M)
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which retail business operates both nationally and internationally (B&M)
  •  integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend retail business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M)
  • the processes of management and decision making;
  • concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills relevant to solving problems in a retail context
  • the nature of retailing and other domestic and international organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M)
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within national and international organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in the retailing industries both domestically and globally (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon retailing organisations (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • the development of appropriate policies and retailing strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management (B&M).
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M)
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M)
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1         Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Reporting 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
BSA080/085 Quantitative Methods for Business A or B 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
BSA110/115 Business Modelling A or B 10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education on entry.

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB125 Retail and Service Operations 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
BSB131 Visual Merchandising 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB137 Data Analysis for Marketing Decisions 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC180 Retailing Logistics 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC170 Retailing Strategy 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 30 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC115 International Marketing 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC017 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
ISC027 Information and Knowledge Management 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 50 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
GROUP 2  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 10 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Retailing, Marketing and Management (2016, 2017 and 2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Retailing, Marketing and Management
Programme code BSUB50
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code NN25
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/nn25

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Retailing, Marketing and Management degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in retail management, marketing or other similar management situations.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training, particularly in the areas of retailing and marketing. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in the areas of retailing and marketing by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience on professional placement. 
  • To provide students with deep insight into retailing and management through the use of a wide variety of case studies. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General and Business Management
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including marketing, economics, business mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main domestic and global business and management functions (B&M)
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which retail business operates both nationally and internationally (B&M)
  •  integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend retail business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M)
  • the processes of management and decision making;
  • concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills relevant to solving problems in a retail context
  • the nature of retailing and other domestic and international organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M)
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within national and international organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in the retailing industries both domestically and globally (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon retailing organisations (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • the development of appropriate policies and retailing strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management (B&M).
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M)
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M)
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1         Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Reporting 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
BSA080/085 Quantitative Methods for Business A or B 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
BSA110/115 Business Modelling A or B 10

Students will be required to select one or other of BSA080/085 in Semester 1 and one or other of BSA110/115 in Semester 2 based on their level of maths education on entry.

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB125 Retail and Service Operations 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB105 Global Brand Management 10
BSB131 Visual Merchandising 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB137 Data Analysis for Marketing Decisions 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB027 Financial Markets and Derivatives 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits, as required by the School of Business and Economics.  Students who select this option must ensure that they have taken a total of 60 credits in Semester One.

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC180 Retailing Logistics 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC170 Retailing Strategy 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 30 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC115 International Marketing 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC017 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
ISC027 Information and Knowledge Management 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 50 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
GROUP 2  
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location (suspended 2019) 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 10 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Retailing, Marketing and Management (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Retailing, Marketing and Management
Programme code BSUB50
Length of programme The duration of the programme is six semesters, plus one academic year, and has four streams. Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates following the Study Abroad stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution. Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution. The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.
UCAS code NN25
Admissions criteria

BSc DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/nn25

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

The Retailing, Marketing and Management degree programme aims to produce high quality graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in retail management, marketing or other similar management situations.

Within this general aim the programme specifically seeks to encourage students

  • To develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management as a sound basis for practice, study and training, particularly in the areas of retailing and marketing. 
  • To develop a deep understanding in the areas of retailing and marketing by pursuing them over an extended period and in considerable depth. 
  • To develop the concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills necessary for management problem solving, including through individual experience on placement. 
  • To develop a positive attitude to change, a desire for excellence, a visionary and positive approach to future developments and an openness to new ideas.

Consequently the programme seeks

  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through vocational experience in a professional placement. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through individual experience on professional placement. 
  • To provide students with deep insight into retailing and management through the use of a wide variety of case studies. 
  • To develop teaching and learning in response to advances in scholarship and the needs of the business community. 
  • To enhance the employability of our graduates.

 

The School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University is distinctive amongst 'traditional' university business schools in incorporating a third year spent on professional placement. This is an integral element of the programme and something which we believe is of particular benefit in achieving these aims.  It offers students on our degrees additional and valuable opportunities to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General and Business Management
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the areas shown below. These intended learning outcomes are set in the context of the QAA subject benchmark statement for Business and Management and those relating directly to this benchmark are marked (B&M) below.

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas

  • the foundation disciplines of business and management including marketing, economics, business mathematics and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M)
  • the economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which retail business operates (B&M)
  •  integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend retail business situations and develop appropriate analysis and solutions (B&M)
  • the processes of management and decision making;
  • concepts, analytical approaches, evaluative thinking and numeracy skills relevant to solving problems in a retail context
  • the nature of retailing and other organisations and the behaviour of people within them, both individually and working in groups (B&M)
  • the development and operation of markets for resources, goods and services including customer expectations, market orientation and the marketing mix (B&M);
  • the use of accounting and other information systems for managerial applications (B&M);
  • the management and development of people within organisations (B&M);
  • the management of operations in the retailing industries (B&M);
  • the development, management and exploitation of information systems and their impact upon retailing organisations (B&M);
  • the key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M);
  • the development of appropriate policies and retailing strategies at the corporate level within a changing national and international environment (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios (B&M);
  • Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems;
  • Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions (B&M);
  • Relate theory to practice in business and management(B&M).
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Communicate effectively in a business context, using a range of styles and media appropriate for management (B&M);
  • make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software (B&M)
  • conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M)
  • use effective team-working skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M)
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of the programme students should be able to

  • Organise themselves personally and independently to be a valued contributor through  time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and proactiveness (B&M);
  • Analyse and assess their own personality, needs and abilities and be proactive in managing their personal development (B&M);
  • Deploy appropriate interpersonal skills to achieve the best from others, including effective communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution (B&M);
  • Display a positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Accept and analyse new ideas and assess alternatives when presented with a range of possible interpretations and/or solutions;
  • Learn and work independently (B&M);
  • Interpret numerical information, reason numerically and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques (B&M);
  • Communicate clearly and persuasively, both orally and in writing (B&M);
  • Use information and communication technologies effectively and efficiently (ICT);
  • Work well in a team, using appropriate skills, including leadership, team-building and project management (B&M).

4. Programme structure

4.1         Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA007 Skills for Study, Placement and Employment 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA005 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA055 Principles of Marketing 10
BSA070 Financial Framework 10
BSA075 Introduction to Retail Management 10
BSA080 Quantitative Methods for Business A 10
or BSA085 Quantitative Methods for Business B 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA053 Organisations in the International Context 10
BSA057 The Marketing Mix 10
BSA060 Microeconomics for Business 10
BSA077 Retailing Environment 10
BSA110 Business Modelling A 10
or BSA115 Business Modelling B 10

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management 10
BSB040 Human Resource Management 10
BSB125 Retail and Service Operations 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB070 Accounting for Management Decisions 10
BSB105 Brand Management 10
BSB131 Visual Merchandising 10
BSB132 Retail Buying 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSB023 Macroeconomics for Business 10
BSB035 Sales Management 10
BSB050 International Business 10
BSB137 Data Analysis for Marketing Decisions 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB024 International Economics 10
BSB025 Financial Management 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB052 International Management 10
BSB087 Vocational Psychology 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management 10
BSB150 Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility 10

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  Candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits, as required by the School of Business and Economics.  Students who select this option must ensure that they have taken a total of 60 credits in Semester One.

 

4.3       Part I

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

iii)       Split Stream

         Candidates will undertake an appropriate business placement for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

(iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment,  approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC180 Retailing Logistics 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC170 Retailing Strategy 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 30 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC115 International Marketing 10
GROUP 2  
BSC015 Financial Management and Corporate Policy 10
BSC020 Corporate Reconstruction and Turnaround 10
BSC030 Corporate Governance 10
BSC051 International Corporate Governance and Firms. 10
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management 10
BSC100 Advanced Interpersonal Skills 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC130 Business Programming 10
BSC132 Small Business Issues 10
BSC165 Business Forecasting 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES, with a total credit weighting of 50 from the approved list of options*  
GROUP 1*  
BSC117 Services Marketing 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
GROUP 2  
BSC016 Financial Risk Management 10
BSC018 Behavioural Finance 10
BSC042 Corporate and Wholesale Banking 10
BSC053 International Negotiations 10
BSC059 Business and Entrepreneurialism in Postconflict Spaces 10
BSC068 Consulting for Decision Making 10
BSC071 Managing Big Data 10
BSC072 Strategic Information Management 10
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC134 Business Planning for New Ventures 10
BSC136 Enterprise Resource Planning 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC175 Retail Location 10
*Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 at least 10 credits must be chosen from Group 1*.

Various semester 2 modules in the final year have a pre-requisite module in semester 1 of the final year.  Students must carefully check their preferred modules' pre-requisites before making selections as all pre-requisites will be rigorously enforced.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

- To progress from Part B to the period of professional training or study at an approved institution abroad, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits in Part B as well as achieving at least 30% in all modules taken in Part B.

Provision will be made in accordance with regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in Part A or Part B of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Business Studies (Singapore) (Aug 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)
Programme title Business Studies
Programme code BSUB70
Length of programme 3-year, part-time programme, with each year comprising 3 semesters.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

Most students on the programme have followed the Singaporean education system. Therefore, the minimum admission requirements for the programme are based on this and, more specifically, the pre-university diploma qualifications awarded by PSB Academy. Students will be considered for the programme if they have or exceed one of the following:

a) PSB Academy Diploma (pre Oct 2013 Full Time or pre Jan 2014 Part Time) with average B grade AND work experience

b) PSB Academy Advanced Diploma (pre Oct 2013 FT or pre Jan 2014 PT) with average B/C grade

c) PSB Academy Diploma (post Oct 2013 FT or post Jan 2014 PT) with average B/C grade

d) A diploma from a recognised local/overseas polytechnic or professional institution with average B/C grade.

e) 3 GCE 'A' Levels (excluding General Studies) / 3 H2 passes with minimum aggregate of 10 points PLUS evidence of GCE Maths and English Grade B.

Students with a PSB Academy Advanced Diploma (pre Oct 2013 FT or pre Jan 2014 PT) in Business Administration; Business Studies, Business Studies (Logistics) or Commerce or a PSB Academy Diploma (post Oct 2013 FT or post Jan 2014 PT) in Business Administration; Business Studies, Business Studies (Logistics) or Commerce who have achieved at least a B/C average, may be exempted from Part A studies and be awarded direct entry onto Part B.

Students are recruited by PSB Academy. However, the Admissions Tutor at Loughborough University School of Business & Economics and the Singapore Programme Director are responsible for the admissions policy and for making the final decision about entry to the programme. Applicants from outside the Singaporean education system and/or applicants with other education qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • Produce high quality employable graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in a wide range of management situations;
  • Develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management and to develop the ability to integrate and apply them in a business context to provide a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduates’ chosen profession or management specialism;
  • Provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through enabling students to apply their learning to their workplace on a continuous basis;
  • Enable students to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through the students’ own work experience;

 

The BSc Business Studies programme is a part-time programme and does not incorporate a professional placement period as all students on the programme are in employment and studying part-time. This implies that one of the main priorities of the programme is to integrate the daily work experiences of the students into their learning environment while at the same time ensuring that students receive the theoretical and academic knowledge to underpin and understand their working environment and that they are in a position to implement their learning in an effective manner.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA: The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Loughborough University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • Loughborough University Mission Statement
  • School of Business and Economics Mission Statement and Statement of General Aims for Undergraduate Programmes
  • Loughborough University Academic Quality Procedures
  • Loughborough University Strategic Plan
  • QAA Audit of Overseas Collaborative Arrangements
  • Singapore Ministry of Education: Desired Outcomes of Education

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  • Foundation disciplines of business and management, including economics, finance, marketing, human resources and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions;
  • The economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which business operates;
  • Integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis, responses and solutions in both a national and international context;
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies at corporate level within a dynamic (international) environment;
  • The key communication and information technologies used in business and management;
  • A variety of working environments and the process of adapting and implementing taught elements of the programme into live work-place situations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to: 

  • Reason numerically and have the ability to interpret numerical information;
  • Obtain, analyse and apply information from a variety of sources, including publicly available material;
  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios;
  • Effectively formulate and solve problems, both structured and unstructured, and take decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of analyses and solutions;
  • Relate theory to practice.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students will be expected to have acquired the following subject-specific practical skills: 

  • Conduct research effectively and efficiently using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the Internet;
  • The ability to work together effectively, efficiently and co-operatively as a team member and, when appropriate, organise, guide and motivate other team members;
  • Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in a business situation, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources;
  • Create, exploit and apply quantitative models to business problems and phenomena.
c. Key transferable skills:

On completion of the programme, students will be expected to have acquired the following general and transferable skills: 

  • Use of effective oral and written communication using a range of media, including business reports;
  • Use of effective personal organisation including time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and pro-activeness;
  • Use of interpersonal skills effectively, including communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution;
  • A positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Use of numerical reasoning, interpret numerical information and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques;
  • Use of effective team-working skills;
  • A sensitive awareness and clear understanding of how people work individually, in groups and within organisations;

4. Programme structure

4.1 Part A - Introductory Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 120)

Code

 

Title

Modular Weight

BSA650

Organisational Behaviour and Management

20

BSA655

Economic Environment

20

BSA661

Personal Effectiveness

20

BSA665

Introduction to Marketing

20

BSA670

An Introduction to Accounting for Management

20

BSA675

Business Mathematics and Statistics

20


 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 120)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSB650

Introduction to Human Resource Management

20

BSB655

Business Information Systems

20

BSB697

Corporate Finance

20

BSB685

International Business 

20

BSB670

Market Development and Buyer Behaviour

20

BSB675

Operations and Project Management

20

       

 

 

4.3       Part C - Degree Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 80)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSC653

Work Based Learning

20

BSC665

Marketing Strategy and Planning

20

BSC675

Small Business Issues and Planning

20

BSC680

Strategic Management

20

       

 

OPTION MODULES (Students to choose 2 from 3.  Total modular weight 40)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSC660

Information Management and Strategy

20

BSC670

Current Issues in Managing People at Work

20

BSC685

Resourcing, Recruitment and Selection

20

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

 

For the purposes of interpreting regulation XX sections on “Arrangements for Re-assessment”, candidates will be considered to be registered on a full-time programme rather than a part-time programme.

 

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the Special Assessment period or when the assessment next takes place. Notwithstanding Regulation XX paragraph 47, unless otherwise stated by the Programme Board, part-time students may choose whether to take re-assessments either in the SAP, over the academic year, or where more than one re-assessment is to be taken, a combination of both.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Business Studies with Banking and Finance (Singapore) (August 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)
Programme title Business Studies with Banking and Finance
Programme code BSUB75
Length of programme The duration of the programme is three years.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

Most students on the programme have followed the Singaporean education system. Therefore, the minimum admission requirements for the programme are based on this and, more specifically, the pre-university diploma qualifications awarded by PSB Academy. Students will be considered for the programme if they have or exceed one of the following:

a) PSB Academy Diploma (pre Oct 2013 Full Time or pre Jan 2014 Part Time) with average B grade AND work experience

b) PSB Academy Advanced Diploma (pre Oct 2013 FT or pre Jan 2014 PT) with average B/C grade

c) PSB Academy Diploma (post Oct 2013 FT or post Jan 2014 PT) with average B/C grade

d) A diploma from a recognised local/overseas polytechnic or professional institution with average B/C grade.

e) 3 GCE 'A' Levels (excluding General Studies) / 3 H2 passes with minimum aggregate of 10 points PLUS evidence of GCE Maths and English Grade B.

Students with a PSB Academy Advanced Diploma (pre Oct 2013 FT or pre Jan 2014 PT) in Business Administration; Business Studies, Business Studies (Logistics) or Commerce or a PSB Academy Diploma (post Oct 2013 FT or post Jan 2014 PT) in Business Administration; Business Studies, Business Studies (Logistics) or Commerce who have achieved at least a B/C average, may be exempted from Part A studies and be awarded direct entry onto Part B.

Students are recruited by PSB Academy. However, the Admissions Tutor at Loughborough University School of Business & Economics and the Singapore Programme Director are responsible for the admissions policy and for making the final decision about entry to the programme. Applicants from outside the Singaporean education system and/or applicants with other education qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • Provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme which allows students to focus on particular functions within the business environment, namely banking and finance, and to place these functions and their operations in context within the wider business and management field;
  • Provide a relevant and practical programme through close links with many large organisations and through enabling students to apply their learning to their workplace on a continuous basis;
  • Enable students to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through the students’ own work experience, particularly in the areas of banking and finance;
  • Develop teaching and learning in response to the needs of the business community;
  • Enhance the employability of our graduates through building on their prior studies and their experience in commerce and industry.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The benchmark statement for General Business and Management (B&M)
  • The benchmark statement for Finance (F)
  • QAA: The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Loughborough University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • Loughborough University Mission Statement
  • School of Business and Economics Mission Statement and Statement of General Aims for
  • Undergraduate Programmes
  • Loughborough University Academic Quality Procedures
  • Loughborough University Strategic Plan
  • QAA Audit of Overseas Collaborative Arrangements
  • Singapore Ministry of Education: Desired Outcomes of Education

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  • Foundation disciplines of business and management, including economics, finance, marketing and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions (B&M);
  • The economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which banks and other businesses operate, including the institutional framework necessary for understanding the role, operation and markets of financial institutions (B&M, F);
  • Integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis, responses and solutions in both a national and international context (B&M);
  • The major theoretical tools and theories of finance and their relevance and application to practical problems (F);
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies at corporate level for banks and their clients within a dynamic (international) environment (B&M amended);
  • The key communication and information technologies used in business and management (B&M).

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to: 

  • Reason numerically and have the ability to interpret numerical information;
  • Analyse and apply information from a variety of sources, including publicly available material;
  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios;
  • Effectively formulate and solve problems, both structured and unstructured, and take decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of analyses and solutions;
  • Relate theory to practice in banking, finance and wider business environments.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should have achieved the following subject-specific practical skills: 

  • Create, exploit and apply quantitative and economic modelling techniques to business and finance problems and phenomena;
  • Analyse and draw reasoned conclusions concerning structured and unstructured problems in the context of business, banking and finance (F amended)
  • Apply understanding to a variety of working environments and adapt and implement taught elements of the programme into live work-place situations (B&M).
c. Key transferable skills:

On completion of the programme, students will be expected to have acquired the following general and transferable skills: 

  • Use of effective personal organisation including time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and pro-activeness;
  • Use of effective oral and written communication using a range of media, including business reports;
  • Use of information and communication technologies in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of Internet and e-mail using appropriate software;
  • Conduct research effectively and efficiently using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the Internet;
  • Work effectively, efficiently and co-operatively as a team member and, when appropriate, organise, guide, motivate and resolve conflict with other team members;
  • Use numerical reasoning, interpret numerical information and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques;
  • Demonstrate a clear understanding of how people work individually, in groups and within organisations.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 120)

Code

 

Title

Modular Weight

BSA650

Organisational Behaviour and Management

20

BSA655

Economic Environment

20

BSA661

Personal Effectiveness

20

BSA665

Introduction to Marketing

20

BSA670

An Introduction to Accounting for Management

20

BSA675

Business Mathematics and Statistics

20

  

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 100)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSB655

Business Information Systems

20

BSB697

Corporate Finance

20

BSB685

International Business 

20

BSB690

The Business of Banking

20

BSB695

Financial Systems, Markets and Institutions

20

       

             

            OPTION MODULES (Students to choose one from two). Total modular weight 20

 

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSB650

Introduction to Human Resource Management

20

BSB670

Market Development and Buyer Behaviour

20

       

 

 

4.3       Part C - Degree Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 120)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSC653

Work Based Learning

20

BSC660

Information Management and Strategy

20

BSC675

Small Business Issues and Planning

20

BSC680

Strategic Management

20

BSC697

International Financial Management

20

BSC695

International Banking

20

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

For the purposes of interpreting regulation XX sections on “Arrangements for Re-assessment”, candidates will be considered to be registered on a full-time programme rather than a part-time programme.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the Special Assessment period or when the assessment next takes place. Notwithstanding Regulation XX paragraph 47, unless otherwise stated by the Programme Board, part-time students may choose whether to take re-assessments either in the SAP, over the academic year, or where more than one re-assessment is to be taken, a combination of both.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Business Studies with HRM (Singapore) (August 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)
Programme title Business Studies with Human Resource Management
Programme code BSUB80
Length of programme 3-year, part-time programme, with each year comprising 3 semesters.
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

Most students on the programme have followed the Singaporean education system. Therefore, the minimum admission requirements for the programme are based on this and, more specifically, the pre-university diploma qualifications awarded by PSB Academy. Students will be considered for the programme if they have or exceed one of the following:

a) PSB Academy Diploma (pre Oct 2013 Full Time or pre Jan 2014 Part Time) with average B grade AND work experience

b) PSB Academy Advanced Diploma (pre Oct 2013 FT or pre Jan 2014 PT) with average B/C grade

c) PSB Academy Diploma (post Oct 2013 FT or post Jan 2014 PT) with average B/C grade

d) A diploma from a recognised local/overseas polytechnic or professional institution with average B/C grade.

e) 3 GCE 'A' Levels (excluding General Studies) / 3 H2 passes with minimum aggregate of 10 points PLUS evidence of GCE Maths and English Grade B.

Students with a PSB Academy Advanced Diploma (pre Oct 2013 FT or pre Jan 2014 PT) in Business Administration; Business Studies, Business Studies (Logistics) or Commerce or a PSB Academy Diploma (post Oct 2013 FT or post Jan 2014 PT) in Business Administration; Business Studies, Business Studies (Logistics) or Commerce who have achieved at least a B/C average, may be exempted from Part A studies and be awarded direct entry onto Part B.

Students are recruited by PSB Academy. However, the Admissions Tutor at Loughborough University School of Business & Economics and the Singapore Programme Director are responsible for the admissions policy and for making the final decision about entry to the programme. Applicants from outside the Singaporean education system and/or applicants with other education qualifications will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • Produce high quality employable graduates with the knowledge, skills and understanding for an effective and valued career in management;
  • In addition to the above, produce high quality students with the knowledge, skills and understanding required for effective Human Resource Management within an organisation;
  • Develop knowledge, concepts and skills in the major academic disciplines of business and management and to develop the ability to integrate and apply them in a business context to provide a sound basis for practice, study and training in the graduates’ chosen profession or management specialism;
  • Recognise the importance of integration of HRM activities with the wider business strategy;
  • Provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with many large organisations and through enabling students to apply their learning to their workplace on a continuous basis;
  • Enable students to see ways in which theory can be applied in practice, both through taught content and through the students’ own work experience;

 

The BSc Business Studies with HRM is a part-time programme and does not incorporate a professional placement period as all students on the programme are in employment and studying part-time. This implies that one of the main priorities of the programme is to integrate the daily work experiences of the students into their learning environment while at the same time ensuring that students receive the theoretical and academic knowledge to underpin and understand their working environment and that they are in a position to implement their learning in an effective manner.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA: The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications
  • Loughborough University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • Loughborough University Mission Statement
  • School of Business and Economics Mission Statement and Statement of General Aims for Undergraduate Programmes
  • Loughborough University Academic Quality Procedures
  • Loughborough University Strategic Plan
  • QAA Audit of Overseas Collaborative Arrangements
  • Singapore Ministry of Education: Desired Outcomes of Education

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • Foundation disciplines of business and management, including economics, finance, marketing, HRM and statistics sufficient to enable a clear understanding of the central aspects of the main business and management functions;
  • The economic, technological, financial, legal, cultural and political context within which business operates;
  • Integration of concepts from the various business disciplines to comprehend business situations and develop appropriate analysis, responses and solutions in both a national and international context;
  • The behaviour, management, development, selection and remuneration of human resources within organisations
  • The development of appropriate policies and strategies at corporate level within a dynamic (international) environment;
  • The key communication and information technologies used in business and management;
  • A variety of working environments and the process of adapting and implementing taught elements of the programme into live work-place situations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme students should be able to:

  • Understand and apply the concepts within the specialised field of human resource management;
  • Reason numerically and have the ability to interpret numerical information;
  • Obtain, analyse and apply information from a variety of sources, including publicly available material;
  • Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios;
  • Effectively formulate and solve problems, both structured and unstructured, and take decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of analyses and solutions;
  • Relate theory to practice.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme students will be expected to have acquired the following subject-specific practical skills: 

  • Conduct research effectively and efficiently using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the Internet;
  • The ability to work together effectively, efficiently and co-operatively as a team member and, when appropriate, organise, guide and motivate other team members;
  • Create, exploit and apply quantitative models to business problems and phenomena;
  • Create, evaluate and/or assess a range of options in an HRM context, applying ideas and knowledge from a variety of sources.
c. Key transferable skills:

On completion of the programme, students will be expected to have acquired the following general and transferable skills:

  • Use of effective personal organisation including time management, self-direction, self-motivation, tenacity and pro-activeness;
  • Use effective oral and written communication, using a range of media including business reports;
  • Use of interpersonal skills effectively, including communication, listening, influencing and conflict resolution;
  • A positive attitude to change, with a desire for excellence and a visionary and positive approach to future developments;
  • Use of numerical reasoning, interpret numerical information and apply appropriate mathematical and statistical techniques;
  • Use of effective team-working skills;
  • A sensitive awareness and clear understanding of how people work individually, in groups and within organisations;

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 120)

Code

 

Title

Modular Weight

BSA650

Organisational Behaviour and Management

20

BSA655

Economic Environment

20

BSA661

Personal Effectiveness

20

BSA665

Introduction to Marketing

20

BSA670

An Introduction to Accounting for Management

20

BSA675

Business Mathematics and Statistics

20


 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 100)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSB650

Introduction to Human Resource Management

20

BSB697

Corporate Finance

20

BSB685

International Business 

20

BSB670

Market Development and Buyer Behaviour     

20

BSB680

The Dynamics of Employment Relations

20

       

 

            OPTION MODULES (Students to choose 1 from 2.  Total modular weight 20)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSB655

Business Information Systems

20

BSB675

Operations and Project Management

20

       

 

 

4.3       Part C - Degree Modules

 

            COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 120)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

BSC653

Work Based Learning

20

BSC670

Current Issues in Managing People at Work

20

BSC675

Small Business Issues and Planning

20

BSC680

Strategic Management

20

BSC685

Resourcing, Recruitment and Selection

20

BSC690

Human Resource Development

20

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

For the purposes of interpreting regulation XX sections on “Arrangements for Re-assessment”, candidates will be considered to be registered on a full-time programme rather than a part-time programme. 

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of re-assessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the Special Assessment period or when the assessment next takes place. Notwithstanding Regulation XX paragraph 47, unless otherwise stated by the Programme Board, part-time students may choose whether to take re-assessments either in the SAP, over the academic year, or where more than one re-assessment is to be taken, a combination of both.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates’ final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C, in accordance with the scheme set out in regulation XX.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 25: Part C 75, to determine the final overall percentage mark for the Programme (the Programme Mark).

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Economics and Management (2016-2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/ BSc+DPS/ BSc+DIntS
Programme title Economics and Management
Programme code ECUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programmes is either six semesters or eight semesters. The option of eight semesters has four streams. Permission to transfer to the 8 semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code LN12 Economics and Management (3 years) LN1F Economics and Management (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln12

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln1f

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with specialised training in the core aspects of economics and management particularly relevant to industry and commerce.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in both economics and in management.
  • To provide students with core concepts in management and business.
  • To equip students with the relevant tools to understand how firms behave, compete and implement strategies with reference to both their internal and external environment.
  • To provide a foundation of knowledge about the workings of the domestic and international economy and to understand the impact of the economic environment on a range of business settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To enable data handling skills relating to the analysis of information available and generated by modern business in order for managers to make effective and timely decisions.
  • To develop students' communication and interpersonal skills and their ability to work in groups developing practical skills essential for working in a business environment.
  • To provide students with the knowledge, skills and understanding required for a career in the economics and management professions.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of managerial problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with industry, professional firms and accounting bodies, and through accreditation by the major professional accounting bodies.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  1. QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
  2. Benchmark Statements for General Business and Management
  3. Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
  4. International links with a network of eleven European Universities within the Erasmus exchange programme.
  5. University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
  6. Departmental learning and teaching policies.
  7. Links, both formal and informal, with external examiners.
  8. Staff research specialisms and professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, within the Economics portion of the programme students will learn:

K1. A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

K2. Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These cover mathematical and statistical methods, that may possibly include econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data at the national and international level. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3. The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of microeconomic and macroeconomic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics in both UK and global contexts. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial policy. Related to this, they should have the ability to evaluate government economic policy and to assess the performance of the domestic and international economies and the impact on the business environment.  

Within the Management portion of the degree students will develop an understanding of:

K4. organisations; their internal structures and their management, including the management of human resources, financial resources and information systems at both the domestic and global level.

K5. the national and international external environment within which organisations operate; the markets for goods, services and finance; customers and the implications for marketing.

K6. analytical frameworks, techniques and processes; business policy and strategy; development of policy and strategy; current issues in strategic management both nationally and internationally.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

C1. Abstract and synthesise information.

C2. Develop problem-solving and decision-making skills using the analytical tools of deduction and induction reasoning.

C3. Critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text.

C4. Framing an economic problem within the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments.

C5. Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios.

C6. Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems.

C7. Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions.

C8. Relate theory to practice in business and management (B&M).

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1. Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2. Combine and interpret different types of evidence using appropriate techniques.

P3. Use effective communication, both oral and written, in a range of styles and media appropriate for management in different cultures.

P4. Make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software.

P5. Conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M).

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of:

T1. Analysis and decision making.

T2. Communication, both written and verbal.

T3. Numeracy and computation.

T4. IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5. Independent study and group work.

T6. Time management.

T7. Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

4.1 Structure

4.1.1 Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50.

4.1.2 The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.

4.1.3 The option of eight semesters has four streams: 

  • Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution.
  • Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.

The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.

 

4.2 Content

Modules are classified as either Economics (codes beginning with EC), or Management (codes beginning with BS).

4.2.1       Part A 

All the following Part A modules are compulsory.

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis 20
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10

 

4.2.2       Part B  

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight: 90 credits):

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB501 Fundamental Macroeconomics   20
ECB502 Fundamental Microeconomics 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management  10
BSB560 Principles of Marketing  10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB532 Accounting for Managers 10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
BSB590 The Contemporary Business Environment 10
OPTIONAL MODULES - Choose a MAXIMUM of 30 credits from:  
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics (not if taking BSB110) 20
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics (not if taking BSB025) 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB025 Financial Management (not if taking ECB004) 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB039 Economics of Business Strategy 20
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management (not if taking ECB003) 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10
BSB562 The Marketing Mix  10

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

 

4.2.3       Optional Part I (8 semester programme only)

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake industrial or professional training.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

 iii)        Split Stream

Candidates will undertake industrial or professional training for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

 (iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment, approved by the School of Business and Economics.

 

4.2.4       Part C - student must choose 60 credits in Economics (EC) and 60 credits in Management (BS)

Compulsory modules (total modular weight: 30 credits):

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
BSC575 Leadership and Interpersonal Skills 10
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC038 Applied Econometrics 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics  20
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing 20
ECC031 International Trade  20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics  20
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
BSC097 Knowledge Management (suspended 2019) 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC522 Entrepreneurship and Innovation 10
BSC570 Strategic Management 20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics  20
ECC035 Central Banking and Financial Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC139 Environmental Economics 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives 20
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC085 The Changing Work Organisation (Suspended 2018) 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC524 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning 10

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Progression Criteria

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

5.3 Accreditation for Economics and Management

In order to retain exemptions from foundation-level professional courses (under the requirements of the professional bodies) following graduation, candidates must achieve a minimum mark of 40% overall and 35% in each assessed component in core modules as defined by the various professional bodies for accreditation purposes. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Economics and Management (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc/ BSc+DPS/ BSc+DIntS
Programme title Economics and Management
Programme code ECUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programmes is either six semesters or eight semesters. The option of eight semesters has four streams. Permission to transfer to the 8 semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code LN12 Economics and Management (3 years) LN1F Economics and Management (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln12

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln1f

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with specialised training in the core aspects of economics and management particularly relevant to industry and commerce.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to study a broad curriculum in both economics and in management.
  • To provide students with core concepts in management and business.
  • To equip students with the relevant tools to understand how firms behave, compete and implement strategies with reference to both their internal and external environment.
  • To provide a foundation of knowledge about the workings of the domestic and international economy and to understand the impact of the economic environment on a range of business settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To enable data handling skills relating to the analysis on information available and generated by modern business in order for managers to make effective and timely decisions.
  • To develop students' communication and interpersonal skills and their ability to work in groups developing practical skills essential for working in a business environment.
  • To provide students with the knowledge, skills and understanding required for a career in the economics and management professions.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of managerial problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a relevant, practical and constantly updated programme through close links with industry, professional firms and accounting bodies, and through accreditation by the major professional accounting bodies.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment prospects on graduating by developing a range of transferable skills embedded in the programme.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  1. QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
  2. Benchmark Statements for General Business and Management
  3. Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
  4. International links with a network of eleven European Universities within the Erasmus exchange programme.
  5. University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
  6. Departmental learning and teaching policies.
  7. Links, both formal and informal, with external examiners.
  8. Staff research specialisms and professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, within the Economics portion of the programme students will learn:

K1. A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

K2. Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These cover mathematical and statistical methods, that may possibly include econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3. The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of microeconomic and macroeconomic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial policy. Related to this, they should have the ability to evaluate government economic policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies and the impact on the business environment.  

Within the Management portion of the degree students will develop an understanding of:

K4. organisations; their internal structures and their management, including the management of human resources, financial resources and information systems.

K5. the external environment within which organisations operate; the markets for goods, services and finance; customers and the implications for marketing.

K6. analytical frameworks, techniques and processes; business policy and strategy; development of policy and strategy; current issues in strategic management.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

C1. Abstract and synthesise information.

C2. Develop problem-solving and decision-making skills using the analytical tools of deduction and induction reasoning.

C3. Critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including data and text.

C4. Framing an economic problem within the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments.

C5. Use critical thinking, analysis and synthesis to evaluate and apply concepts and insights from business disciplines, including comprehension of complex scenarios.

C6. Formulate and solve both structured and unstructured business problems.

C7. Advise on business decisions using appropriate qualitative and quantitative skills, including the ability to identify and evaluate a range of alternative solutions.

C8. Relate theory to practice in business and management (B&M).

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1. Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2. Combine and interpret different types of evidence using appropriate techniques.

P3. Use effective communication, both oral and written, in a range of styles and media appropriate for management in different cultures.

P4. Make effective use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in a business context including word processing, storage and manipulation of data, generation of presentations, use of the internet and e-mail using appropriate software.

P5. Conduct research using a range of sources of business-related materials including books, journals, trade and financial press, official statistics and the internet (B&M).

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of:

T1. Analysis and decision making.

T2. Communication, both written and verbal.

T3. Numeracy and computation.

T4. IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5. Independent study and group work.

T6. Time management.

T7. Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

4.1 Structure

4.1.1 Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50.

4.1.2 The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.

4.1.3 The option of eight semesters has four streams: 

  • Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream or the Language Related Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year at an approved academic institution.
  • Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.

The Study Abroad, the Language Related Placement and the Split Stream lead to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.

 

4.2 Content

Modules are classified as either Economics (codes beginning with EC), or Management (codes beginning with BS).

4.2.1       Part A 

All the following Part A modules are compulsory.

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA003 Data Analysis I 10
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
BSA526 Accounting for Managers 10

 

4.2.2       Part B  

Compulsory Modules (total modular weight: 90 credits):

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB001 Intermediate Macroeconomics   20
ECB002 Intermediate Microeconomics 20
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB010 Business Information Management  10
BSB560 Principles of Marketing  10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSB562 The Marketing Mix  10
BSB590 The Contemporary Business Environment 10
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics (not if taking BSB025) 20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB006 Data Analysis II (not if taking BSB110) 10
BSB012 Information Systems Development 10
BSB025 Financial Management (not if taking ECB004) 10
BSB046 Organisation Studies 10
BSB110 Data Analysis for Management (not if taking ECB006) 10
BSB135 Consumer Behaviour 10

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

 

4.2.3       Optional Part I (8 semester programme only)

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

i)       Placement Stream

Candidates will undertake industrial or professional training.

ii)      Study Abroad Stream

Candidates will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions.

 iii)        Split Stream

Candidates will undertake industrial or professional training for half the year and will study at one of the School of Business and Economics approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

 (iv)    Language Related Placement

Candidates will undertake a year abroad in employment, for example as an English language assistant in a school or other educational establishment, approved by the School of Business and Economics.

4.2.4       Part C - Student must choose 60 credits in Economics (EC) and 60 credits in Management (BS)

Compulsory modules (total modular weight: 40 credits):

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
BSC070 Technology in Business and Society 10
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
BSC575 Leadership and Interpersonal Skills 10
ECONOMICS OPTIONAL MODULES (Choose 40 weight)  
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC038 Applied Econometrics 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics  20
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing 20
ECC031 International Trade  20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics  20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics  20
ECC035 Central Banking and Financial Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC139 Environmental Economics 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives 20
BUSINESS OPTIONAL MODULES (Choose 40 weight)  
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSC097 Knowledge Management 10
BSC105 International Human Resource Management 10
BSC110 Marketing Strategy and Planning 10
BSC115 International Marketing 10
BSC570 Strategic Management 20
BSC522 Entrepreneurship and Innovation 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSC080 Analysing Careers 10
BSC124 Marketing Communications 10
BSC144 Project Management 10
BSC524 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Planning 10

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Progression Criteria

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

5.3 Accreditation for Economics and Management

In order to retain exemptions from foundation-level professional courses (under the requirements of the professional bodies) following graduation, candidates must achieve a minimum mark of 40% overall and 35% in each assessed component in core modules as defined by the various professional bodies for accreditation purposes. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Business Economics and Finance (2016-2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc / BSc+DPS / BSc+DIntS
Programme title Business Economics and Finance
Programme code ECUB02
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L1NK Business Economics and Finance (3 years) LN14 Business Economics and Finance (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l1nk

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln14

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics particularly relevant to industry, commerce and financial services.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the domestic and international economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues at the national and international level.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  1. QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
  2. Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
  3. International links with a network of eleven European Universities within the Erasmus exchange programme.
  4. University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
  5. Departmental learning and teaching policies.
  6. Links, both formal and informal, with external examiners.
  7. Staff research specialisms and professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, international trade, international money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both microeconomic and macroeconomic levels both nationally and internationally. In all these, students should show understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data at the national and international level. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy at the national and international level. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other global economies.

  • Specific applications to financial economics. Students should have the ability to analyse financial markets and the industrial organization of firms.

The above implies that the attainments of students should show:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of economic analyses which underlie such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other global economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationship between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of the relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics, with a particular application to business and finance both nationally and internationally.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of agents in financial markets, and the behaviour of firms and consumers in the national and international economy.
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations to implement economic policy at both the domestic and international level.
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision making by agents in the domestic and international economy.
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy, with special emphasis on business and finance.

More specifically students should be able to demonstrate the following rigorous transferable skills: 

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of domestic or international policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of: 

T1.  Analysis and decision making.

T2.  Communication.

T3.  Numeracy and computation.

T4.  IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5.  Independent study and group work.

T6.  Time management.

T7.  Problem solving.

 

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

 

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis 20
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment (Semester 2) 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
GYA004 Geographies of Global Economic Change 10
SSA001 Identities and Inequalities 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
EUA805 British Politics and Government 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Global, Social and Cultural Change 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTERS 1 AND 2 COMPULSORY MODULES:  
ECB501 Fundamental Macroeconomics   20
ECB502 Fundamental Microeconomics 20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics 20
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics 20
SEMESTER 1 AND 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB005 International Economics Relations 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
ECB030 Energy and the Environment (suspended 2019) 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
BSB560 Principles of Marketing  10
EUB601 The European Union 20
GYB211 Globalization A 10
GYB224 Geographies of Social Difference A 10
University Wide Languages Programme  10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB035 The Economics of Social Issues 20
ECB039 Economics of Business Strategy 20
BSB532 Accounting for Managers 10
BSB562 The Marketing Mix 10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
BSB590 The Contemporary Business Environment 10
EUB632 Politics of Developing Countries 20
GYB212 Globalization B 10
GYB222 Geographies of Social Difference B 10
University Wide Languages Programme  10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional  (8 semester programme only) 

Candidates pursue one of the following streams: 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics  20
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
SEMESTER 1 AND 2 OPTIONAL MODULE  
ECC038 Applied Econometrics 20
OPTIONAL MODULES - Group 1**  
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (Semester 1) 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives (Semester 2) 20
OPTIONAL MODULES - Group 2  
ECC001 Development in Microeconomics (Semester 1) 20
ECC003 International Money and Finance (Semester 1) 20
ECC031 International Trade (Semester 1) 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics (Semester 1) 20
ECC035 Central Banking and Financial Crises (Semester 2) 20
ECC119 Development Economics (Semester 2) 20
ECC139 Environment Economics (Semester 2) 20

**At least 20 credits must be chosen from Group 1**

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Criteria for Progression

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in  Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

 

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Business Economics and Finance (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc / BSc+DPS / BSc+DIntS
Programme title Business Economics and Finance
Programme code ECUB02
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L1NK Business Economics and Finance (3 years) LN14 Business Economics and Finance (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l1nk

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/ln14

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics particularly relevant to industry, commerce and financial services.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  1. QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
  2. Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
  3. International links with a network of eleven European Universities within the Erasmus exchange programme.
  4. University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
  5. Departmental learning and teaching policies.
  6. Links, both formal and informal, with external examiners.
  7. Staff research specialisms and professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both microeconomic and macroeconomic levels. In all these, students should show understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.

  • Specific applications to financial economics. Students should have the ability to analyse financial markets and the industrial organization of firms.

The above implies that the attainments of students should show:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of economic analyses which underlie such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationship between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of the relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics, with a particular application to the world of business and finance.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of agents in  financial markets, and the behaviour of firms and consumers in the national and international economy.
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations to implement economic policy.
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision making by agents in the economy.
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy, with special emphasis on business and finance.

More specifically students should be able to demonstrate the following rigorous transferable skills: 

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of: 

T1.  Analysis and decision making.

T2.  Communication.

T3.  Numeracy and computation.

T4.  IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5.  Independent study and group work.

T6.  Time management.

T7.  Problem solving.

 

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

 

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis I (Semester 1) 10
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
ECA005 Data Analysis II (Semester 2) 10
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment (Semester 2) 10
BSA026 Principles of Law (Semester 2) 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE ONE)  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
EUA607 Introduction to Democratic Government 10
GYA004 Geographies of Global Economic Change  10
SSA001 Introduction to Sociology A 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
BSA526 Accounting for Managers 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Introduction to Sociology B 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTERS 1 AND 2 COMPULSORY MODULES:  
ECB001 Intermediate Macroeconomics   20
ECB002 Intermediate Microeconomics 20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics  20
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics 20
SEMESTER 1 AND 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB005 International Economics Relations 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
ECB030 Energy and the Environment 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB560 Principles of Marketing  10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
University-Wide Languages Programme  10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB035 The Economics of Social Issues 20
BSB562 The Marketing Mix 10
University-Wide Languages Programme  10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional  (8 semester programme only) 

Candidates pursue one of the following streams: 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES (you must choose at least one)  
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (Semester 1) 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives (Semester 2) 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics  20
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics 20
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC031 International Trade  20
ECC038 Applied Econometrics (Semesters 1 and 2) 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics 20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC035 Central Banking and Financial Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC139 Environmental Economics 20
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Criteria for Progression

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in  Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

 

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) International Economics (2016, 2017, 2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) / BSc+DPS / BSc+DInts
Programme title International Economics
Programme code ECUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L115 International Economics (3 years) L110 International Economics (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/business-economics/internationaleconomics/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics, with a particular application to the international setting.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of agents firms and consumers in the national and international economy
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations for the implementation of economic policy at both the domestic and economic levels.
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision-making by agents in the domestic and international economy
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy, with special emphasis on international economics.

 

  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics relevant to the international economy including trade, finance and development.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the domestic and international economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues at the national and international level.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, international trade, international money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both microeconomic and macroeconomic levels. In all these, students should show understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data at the national and international level. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy at the national and international level. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.

The above implies that the attainments of students should show:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of economic analyses which underlie such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationship between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of the relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models.

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of: 

T1.  Analysis and decision making.

T2.  Communication.

T3.  Numeracy and computation.

T4.  IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5.  Independent study and group work.

T6.  Time management.

T7.  Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

 

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis I (Semester 1) 10
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
ECA005 Data Analysis II (Semester 2) 10
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment (Semester 2) 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
EUA620 Contemporary World Arena 10
GYA002 Geographies of Global Economic Change  20
SSA001 Identities and Inequalities 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
EUA607 Understanding Democratic Institutions 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Global, Social and Cultural Changes 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules    

 
MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB501 Fundamental Macroeconomics   20
ECB502 Fundamental Microeconomics  20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics  20
ECB005 International Economic Relations  20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
EUB601 The European Union 20
GYB211 Globalization A 10
GYB224 Geographies of Social Difference A 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB035 The Economics of Social Issues 20
ECB039 Economics of Business Strategy 20
EUB632 Politics of Developing Countries 20
GYB212 Globalization B 10
GYB222 Geographies of Social Difference B 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional  (8 semester programme only)

Candidates pursue one of the following streams: 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC031 International Trade 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULE  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC038 Applied Econometrics 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics 20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics 20
ECC035 Central Banking and Economic Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC139 Environmental Economics 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives 20
Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.  

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Progression Criteria

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) International Economics (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) / BSc+DPS / BSc+DInts
Programme title International Economics
Programme code ECUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L115 International Economics (3 years) L110 International Economics (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/business-economics/internationaleconomics/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics, with a particular application to the international setting.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of agents firms and consumers in the national and international economy
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations for the implementation of economic policy
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision-making by agents in the economy
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy, with special emphasis on international economics.

 

  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics relevant to the international economy including trade, finance and development.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both microeconomic and macroeconomic levels. In all these, students should show understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.

The above implies that the attainments of students should show:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of economic analyses which underlie such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationship between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of the relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models.

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of: 

T1.  Analysis and decision making.

T2.  Communication.

T3.  Numeracy and computation.

T4.  IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5.  Independent study and group work.

T6.  Time management.

T7.  Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

 

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis I (Semester 1) 10
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
ECA005 Data Analysis II (Semester 2) 10
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment (Semester 2) 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
EUA607 Introduction to Democratic Government 10
GYA004 Geographies of Global Economic Change  10
SSA001 Introduction to Sociology A 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
BSA526 Accounting for Managers 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Introduction to Sociology B 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules    

 
MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB001 Intermediate Macroeconomics   20
ECB002 Intermediate Microeconomics  20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics  20
ECB005 International Economic Relations  20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
ECB030 Energy and the Environment 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB560 Principles of Marketing 10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
University-Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB562 The Marketing Mix 10
ECB035 The Economics of Social Issues 20
University-Wide Languages Programme 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional  (8 semester programme only)

Candidates pursue one of the following streams: 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC031 International Trade 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing 20
ECC038 Applied Econometrics (Semesters 1 and 2) 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics 20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics 20
ECC035 Central Banking and Economic Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC139 Environmental Economics 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives 20
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Progression Criteria

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) International Economics (2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons) / BSc+DPS / BSc+DInts
Programme title International Economics
Programme code ECUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L115 International Economics (3 years) L110 International Economics (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/business-economics/internationaleconomics/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics, with a particular application to the international setting.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of agents firms and consumers in the national and international economy
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations for the implementation of economic policy
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision-making by agents in the economy
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy, with special emphasis on international economics.

 

  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics relevant to the international economy including trade, finance and development.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both microeconomic and macroeconomic levels. In all these, students should show understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.

The above implies that the attainments of students should show:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of economic analyses which underlie such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationship between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of the relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models.

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of: 

T1.  Analysis and decision making.

T2.  Communication.

T3.  Numeracy and computation.

T4.  IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5.  Independent study and group work.

T6.  Time management.

T7.  Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

 

4.1       Part A - Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis  20
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
EUA620 The Contemporary World Arena 10
GYA004 Geographies of Global Economic Change  10
SSA001 Introduction to Sociology A 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA025 Introduction to Law 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
BSA526 Accounting for Managers 10
EUA607 Introduction to Democratic Government 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Introduction to Sociology B 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.2       Part B - Degree Modules    

 
MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB001 Intermediate Macroeconomics   20
ECB002 Intermediate Microeconomics  20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics  20
ECB005 International Economic Relations  20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB004 Introduction to Finance 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System 20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
ECB030 Energy and the Environment 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB560 Principles of Marketing 10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB522 The Marketing Mix for Sport and Leisure 10
ECB035 Economics of the Welfare State 20
University Wide Languages Programme 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional  (8 semester programme only)

Candidates pursue one of the following streams: 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC031 International Trade 20
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULE  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC038 Applied Econometrics 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics 20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics 20
ECC035 Central Banking and Economic Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives 20
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Progression Criteria

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Economics (2016-2019 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc / BSc+DPS / BSc+DIntS
Programme title Economics
Programme code ECUB04
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L100 Economics (3 years) L10A Economics (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l100

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l10a

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of firms and consumers in the national and international economy.
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations for the implementation of economic policy at both the domestic and international levels.
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision making by agents in the domestic and international economy.
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy.
  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics relevant to the international economy including trade, finance and development.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the domestic and international economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues at the national and international level.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

    1. QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
    2. Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    3. International links with a network of eleven European Universities within the Erasmus exchange programme.
    4. University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
    5. Departmental learning and teaching policies.
    6. Links, both formal and informal, with external examiners.
    7. Staff research specialisms and professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles will cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, international trade, international money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both the microeconomic and macroeconomic levels both nationally and internationally. In all these, students should show an understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and should appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These are likely to cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data at the national and international level. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy at the national and international level. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other global economies.

Specific applications to financial economics.  Students should have the ability to analyse financial markets and the industrial organization of firms.

The above implies that the attainments of students should be:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in economic policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of the economic analysis, that underlies such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other global economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationships between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government both at the national and international level, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of,

T1. Analysis and decision making.

T2. Communication, both written and verbal.

T3. Numeracy and computation.

T4. IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5. Independent study and group work.

T6. Time management.

T7. Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.       

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

4.1       Part A - Economics Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis 20
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment (Semester 2) 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
GYA004 Geographies of Global Economic Change 10
SSA001 Identities and Inequalities 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
EUA805 British Politics and Government 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Global, Social and Cultural Change 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

2.2       Part B - Degree Modules    

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB001 Intermediate Macroeconomics   20
ECB002 Intermediate Microeconomics 20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics  20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics 20
ECB005 International Economic Relations 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System  20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB015 Company Law 10
BSB120 Management Science Methods 10
BSB560 Principles of Marketing  10
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
EUB601 The European Union 20
GYB211 Globalization A 10
GYB224 Geographies of Social Difference A 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB532 Accounting for Managers 10
BSB562 The Marketing Mix 10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
BSB590 The Contemporary Business Environment 10
ECB035 The Economics of Social Issues 20
ECB039 Economics of Business Strategy 20
EUB632 Politics of Developing Countries 20
GYB212 Globalization B 10
GYB222 Geographies of Social Difference B 10
University Wide Languages Programme 10

Option Choices:  Students must select at least 20 credits from EC modules.

Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional (8 semester programme only)           

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULE  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
OPTIONAL MODULES - Group 1**  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics (Semester 1) 20
ECC038 Applied Econometrics (Semester 1 and 2) 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics (Semester 1) 20
OPTIONAL MODULES - Group 2  
ECC003 International Money and Finance (Semester 1) 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing (Semester 1) 20
ECC005 Industrial Economics (Semester 2) 20
ECC031 International Trade (Semester 1) 20
ECC035 Central Banking and Financial Crises (Semester 2) 20
ECC119 Development Economics (Semester 2) 20
ECC139 Environmental Economics (Semester 2) 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives (Semester 2) 20

**Over Semester 1 and Semester 2 AT LEAST 40 credits must be chosen from Group 1**

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

 
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Criteria for Progression

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Economics (2015 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc / BSc+DPS / BSc+DIntS
Programme title Economics
Programme code ECUB04
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L100 Economics (3 years) L10A Economics (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l100

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l10a

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of firms and consumers in the national and international economy.
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations for the implementation of economic policy.
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision making by agents in the economy.
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy.
  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics relevant to the international economy including trade, finance and development.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

    1. QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
    2. Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    3. International links with a network of eleven European Universities within the Erasmus exchange programme.
    4. University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
    5. Departmental learning and teaching policies.
    6. Links, both formal and informal, with external examiners.
    7. Staff research specialisms and professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles will cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both the microeconomic and macroeconomic levels. In all these, students should show an understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and should appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These are likely to cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.

Specific applications to financial economics.  Students should have the ability to analyse financial markets and the industrial organization of firms.

The above implies that the attainments of students should be:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in economic policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of the economic analysis, that underlies such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationships between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of,

T1. Analysis and decision making.

T2. Communication, both written and verbal.

T3. Numeracy and computation.

T4. IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5. Independent study and group work.

T6. Time management.

T7. Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.       

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

4.1       Part A - Economics Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis I (Semester 1) 10
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
ECA005 Data Analysis II (Semester 2) 10
BSA008 Skills for Study and Employment (Semester 2) 10
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
EUA607 Introduction to Democratic Government 10
GYA004 Geographies of Global Economic Change 10
SSA001 Introduction to Sociology A 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA026 Principles of Law 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
BSA526 Accounting for Managers 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Introduction to Sociology B 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

2.2       Part B - Degree Modules    

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB001 Intermediate Macroeconomics   20
ECB002 Intermediate Microeconomics 20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics  20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB004 Introduction to Financial Economics  20
ECB005 International Economic Relations 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System  20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
ECB030 Energy and the Environment 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB560 Principles of Marketing  10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
University-Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB562 The Marketing Mix 10
ECB035 The Economics of Social Issues  20
University-Wide Languages Programme 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional (8 semester programme only)           

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULE  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
COMPULSORY MODULES - You must choose at least two from the three listed:  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics (Semester 2) 20
ECC038 Applied Econometrics (Semesters 1 and 2) 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics (Semester 1) 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing 20
ECC031 International Trade  20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics  20
ECC035 Central Banking and Financial Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC139 Environmental Economics 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives 20
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Criteria for Progression

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Economics (2014 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department School of Business and Economics
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc / BSc+DPS / BSc+DIntS
Programme title Economics
Programme code ECUB04
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the available part I streams. The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C. Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Programme Director (Economics). See Programme Structure for further details of eight semester streams.
UCAS code L100 Economics (3 years) L10A Economics (4 years sandwich)
Admissions criteria

BSc - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l100

BSc+DPS/DIntS - http://www.lboro.ac.uk/l10a

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Know and understand the core of economic theory and applied economics.
  • Know and understand the behaviour of firms and consumers in the national and international economy.
  • Discuss in an informed manner the major policy directions and regulations for the implementation of economic policy.
  • Know and understand the nature of incentives in economic decision making by agents in the economy.
  • Evaluate the outcomes of market and policy changes in all spheres of the economy.
  • To provide specialised training in the aspects of economics relevant to the international economy including trade, finance and development.
  • To provide training in the principles of economics and their application.
  • To stimulate students intellectually through the study of economics and to lead them to appreciate its application to a range of problems and its relevance in a variety of contexts.
  • To provide a firm foundation of knowledge about the workings of the economy and to develop the relevant skills for the constructive use of that knowledge in a range of settings.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and applied problems in economics.
  • To equip students with appropriate tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of economic policy.
  • To develop in students, through the study of economics, a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment.
  • To provide students with analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world.
  • To develop in students the ability to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues.
  • To provide students with the knowledge and skill base, from which they can proceed to further studies in economics, related areas or in multi-disciplinary areas that involve economics.
  • To generate in students an appreciation of the economic dimension of wider social and political issues.

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

    1. QAA Subject Benchmark Statements: Economics.
    2. Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
    3. International links with a network of eleven European Universities within the Erasmus exchange programme.
    4. University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
    5. Departmental learning and teaching policies.
    6. Links, both formal and informal, with external examiners.
    7. Staff research specialisms and professional involvement in the discipline.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

K1.  A coherent core of economic principles. The understanding of these might be verbal, graphical or mathematical.

     These principles will cover the microeconomic issues of decision and choice, the production and exchange of goods, the interdependency of markets, and economic welfare. They also include macroeconomic issues, such as employment, national income, the balance of payments and the distribution of income, inflation, growth and business cycles, money and finance. The understanding should extend to economic policy at both the microeconomic and macroeconomic levels. In all these, students should show an understanding of analytical methods and model-based argument and should appreciate the existence of different methodological approaches.

K2.  Relevant quantitative methods and computing techniques. These are likely to cover mathematical and statistical methods, including econometrics. Students will have exposure to the use of such techniques on actual economic, financial or social data. A knowledge and appreciation of economic data, both quantitative and qualitative. Students should also have some knowledge of the appropriate methods that the economist might use to structure and analyse such data.

K3.  The applications of economics. Students should have the ability to apply a core of economic principles and reasoning to a variety of applied topics. They should also be aware of the economic principles that can be used to design, guide and interpret commercial, economic and social policy. As part of this, they should have the ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.

Specific applications to financial economics.  Students should have the ability to analyse financial markets and the industrial organization of firms.

The above implies that the attainments of students should be:

  • Ability to apply core economic theory and economic reasoning to applied topics.
  • Ability to relate differences in economic policy recommendations to differences in the theoretical and empirical features of the economic analysis, that underlies such recommendations.
  • Ability to discuss and analyse government policy and to assess the performance of the UK and other economies.
  • Understanding of verbal, graphical, mathematical and econometric representation of economic ideas and analysis, including the relationships between them.
  • Understanding of relevant mathematical and statistical techniques.
  • Understanding of analytical methods, both theory- and model-based.
  • Appreciation of the history and development of economic ideas and the differing methods of analysis that have been and are used by economists.
  • Understanding of the appropriate techniques to enable manipulation, treatment and interpretation of relevant statistical data.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1.  Abstraction. From the study of economic principles and models, students see how one can abstract the essential features of complex systems and provide a useable framework for evaluation and assessment of the effects of policy or other exogenous events. Through this, the typical student will acquire proficiency in how to simplify while still retaining relevance. This is an approach that they can then apply in other contexts, thereby becoming more effective problem-solvers and decision-makers.

C2.  Analysis, deduction and induction. Economic reasoning is highly deductive, and logical analysis is applied to assumption-based models. However, inductive reasoning is also important. The typical student will have been exposed to some or all of these and be able to use some of them. Such skills also enhance their problem-solving and decision-making ability.

C3.  Quantification and design. Data, and their effective organization, presentation and analysis, are important in economics. The typical student will have some familiarity with the principal sources of economic information and data relevant to industry, commerce and government, and have had practice in organising it and presenting it informatively. This skill is important at all stages in the decision-making process.

C4.  Framing. Through the study of economics, a student should learn how to decide what should be taken as given or fixed for the purposes of setting up and solving a problem, i.e. what the important 'parameters' are in constraining the solution to the problem. Learning to think about how and why these parameters might change encourages a student to place the economic problem in its broader social and political context. This `framing' skill is important in determining the decision-maker's ability to implement the solutions to problems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1.  Construct economic models using verbal, diagrammatic, mathematical, statistical and econometric techniques and reasoning.

P2.  Access, search for and evaluate relevant data sources for validation of economic models

P3.  Apply and use specialised software including spreadsheets for the analysis of economic models.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate the key skills of,

T1. Analysis and decision making.

T2. Communication, both written and verbal.

T3. Numeracy and computation.

T4. IT, information handling and retrieval, including library skills.

T5. Independent study and group work.

T6. Time management.

T7. Problem solving.

4. Programme structure

Students must have a total modular weighting of 120 credits per year.  This must include the compulsory modules.  The remaining optional modules may be chosen to give a 60:60 split over the two semesters, or alternatively, 50:70 or 70:50. 

The prefixes on module codes represent the credit levels as follows:

            A          level 4;             B          level 5;             C         level 6.       

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

4.1       Part A - Economics Introductory Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECA001 Principles of Macroeconomics 20
ECA002 Principles of Microeconomics 20
ECA003 Data Analysis  20
ECA004 Quantitative Economics 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA505 Organisational Behaviour 10
BSA525 Introduction to Accounting 10
EUA620 The Contemporary World Arena 10
GYA004 Geographies of Global Economic Change 10
SSA001 Introduction to Sociology A 10
SSA201 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES (CHOOSE TWO)  
BSA025 Introduction to Law 10
BSA506 Management of Human Resources 10
BSA526 Accounting for Managers 10
EUA607 Introduction to Democratic Government 10
GYA104 Geographies of Identity  10
SSA002 Introduction to Sociology B 10
SSA202 Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B 10
University Wide Languages Programme (see additional form) 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

2.2       Part B - Degree Modules    

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 1 and 2 COMPULSORY MODULES  
ECB001 Intermediate Macroeconomics   20
ECB002 Intermediate Microeconomics 20
ECB003 Introduction to Econometrics  20
SEMESTER 1 and 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECB004 Introduction to Finance  20
ECB005 International Economic Relations 20
ECB015 Economics of the Financial System  20
ECB016 History of Economic Thought 20
ECB030 Energy and the Environment 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB560 Principles of Marketing  10
BSB580 Operations Management 10
ECB136 Transport Economics 20
University Wide Languages Programme 10
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
BSB522 The Marketing Mix for Sport and Leisure 10
ECB035 Economics of the Welfare State  20
University Wide Languages Programme 10
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester, or split 70:50 or 50:70 over the two Semesters.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 

 

4.3       Part I : Optional (8 semester programme only)           

Candidates pursue one of the following streams:

 

The duration of the programme is either six semesters or six semesters plus one academic year if candidates select one of the following three streams: 

Candidates following the Placement Stream are required to spend the third academic year undertaking professional training leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies, in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

Candidates following the Study Abroad Stream are required to spend the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution leading to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Candidates following the Split Stream are required to spend six months of the third academic year undertaking professional training, and the other half of the third academic year studying at an approved academic institution.  This leads to the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. 

The third academic year (Part I) occurs between Part B and Part C.  Permission to transfer to the eight semester programme will be at the discretion of the Associate Dean (Teaching) for the School.

 

4.4       Part C - Degree Modules

MODULE TITLE Modular Weight
SEMESTER 2 COMPULSORY MODULE  
ECC142 Research and Communication Skills for Economists 20
COMPULSORY MODULES - You must choose at least two from the three listed:  
ECC001 Developments in Microeconomics (Semester 2) 20
ECC038 Applied Econometrics (Semesters 1 and 2) 20
ECC101 Developments in Macroeconomics (Semester 1) 20
SEMESTER 1 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC003 International Money and Finance 20
ECC004 Financial Economics and Asset Pricing 20
ECC031 International Trade  20
SEMESTER 2 OPTIONAL MODULES  
ECC005 Industrial Economics  20
ECC035 Central Banking and Financial Crises 20
ECC119 Development Economics 20
ECC141 Corporate Finance and Derivatives 20
Compulsory and optional modules must be taken such that the total modular weight for the year is 120 credits divided equally over each Semester.

Please note: Optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.
 
 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

5.1 Criteria for Progression

In order to progress from Part A to Part B and from Part B to C and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

A Diploma in Professional Studies will be awarded to students who have satisfactorily completed the programme of study required for Part I.

5.2 Reassessment

Candidates must accumulate at least 60 credits in a Part of a Programme in order to be eligible for reassessment in the relevant Part during the University’s Special Assessment Period.         

If a student registers to resit a module, they will be required to resit all failed components of that module (ie if their coursework mark was less than 40% they must resit the coursework and if their exam mark was less than 40% they must resit the exam).  If a student resits the coursework element of a module and there was more than 1 coursework assignment for that module, then the student would be required to resit all coursework assignments in which they achieved a mark below 40%.  Marks for elements of a module not being re-sat will be carried forward.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX of the University Regulations.  The average percentage marks for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 30% : Part C 70% to determine the final Programme Mark.

Programme Specification

BS BSc (Hons) Economics with Accounting (2016, 2017, 2018 entry)

Academic Year: 2019/20

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting