Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
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Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics [2012 and 2013 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Design Ergonomics
Programme code DSUB10
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS)or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code J923, J922
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/designergonomics/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing with particular attention to human factors

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to user centred product development

To enable students to develop a range of conceptual, practical and professional skills that reflect a synthesis of product design and ergonomics

To develop and foster imaginative, creative and scientific abilities, both individually and in teams

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate methods to identify user needs and abilities and critically evaluate products that require human interaction

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation

To promote an understanding of, and examine the opportunities for, professional practice

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

QAA Benchmark Statements for Art and Design

The Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors - Accreditation

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of …

K1 -   design methodology, the context of design activity, and the role of the designer within professional practice

K2 -   the role of ergonomics and human factors within design practice

K3 -   a user centred approach to design

K4 -   human needs, variability, capability and limitations

K5 -   the role of product form and the semantic impression generated

K6 -   the principles and practice of extended enquiries and user evaluations

K7 -   2d and 3d modelling in both analogue and digital media and their role within product development

K8 -   experimental design, data processing and presentation

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1 - analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy

C2 - demonstrate evidence based reasoning and make critical judgements about arguments in ergonomics and design

C3 - develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group

C4 - identify suitable ergonomics techniques and the appropriate stages where they may be used to support the design process

C5 - demonstrate substantial competence in research skills through practical activities

C6 - analyse quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design

C7 - analyse human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology

C8 - understand the ethical context of psychology and ergonomics as a discipline and demonstrate this in relation to their own empirical work

C9 - identify appropriate 2d and 3d prototyping techniques to support design activity

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1 -   design appropriate evaluations, process quantitative and qualitative data and apply findings in an iterative design process

P2 -   present quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design

P3 -   measure human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology

P4 -   apply ergonomics to real world design situations

P5 -   apply a broad range of 2d and 3d modelling and presentation techniques in both analogue and digital forms to support design activity

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to …

G1 - use creativity and innovation in problem solving

G2 - work within contexts of ambiguity, uncertainty, and unfamiliarity

G3 - reflect upon and present ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms

G4 - interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team

G5 - manage self learning including efficient time management and the ability to meet deadlines

G6 -  identify, retrieve and analyse information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue

G7 -demonstrate competence with information technology, using a range of different software tools

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Contexts

10

1

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping for Design

20

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design

10

1+2

c

DSA104

Introduction to Environmental Ergonomics

10

2

c

DSA105

Introduction to Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSA112

Anatomy

10

1

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 50)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 40)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

Compulsory or Optional

 DSB010

Universal Design

 20

 1+2

 c

 DSB012

 Teaching Design &   Technology

 20

 1+2

 o

 DSB013

 Sustainable Design

 20

 1+2

 o

 DSB018

 Year 2 Design Ergonomics Practice

 30

 1+2

 c

 DSB102

 Ergonomics in the Design of Multi-

 user Systems

 10

 2

 c

 DSB103

 Vision

 10

 1

 o

 DSB105

 Human Response to Noise &  

 Vibration

 10

 1

 o

 DSB106

 Qualitative Methods

 10

 2

c

 DSB108

 Cognitive Ergonomics

 10

 1

 c

 DSB118

 Human Computer Interaction

 10

 1

 c

 DSB113

Study Design  & Data Analysis

 10

 1

 c

 DSA103

 The Body At Work

 10

 2

 o

 DSB104

 Thermal Environment

 10

2

 o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 50)

4.2.1 Permissible Option combinations

                       

Semester 1

Semester 2

20 Weight Module

OR

10 Weight Module

10 Weight module

 OR

                                                                     2X10 Weight modules in Sem 2

 

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Design Ergonomics with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Design Ergonomics with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

Compulsory or Optional

 DSC017

 Computer-aided Ergonomics

 10

 1

 c

 DSC005

 Live Projects

 10

 1+2

 o

 DSC021

 Design Research

 20

 1+2

 o

 DSC022

User Experience Design

 10

 1

 c

 DSC028

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice:  Product Development

 25

 1

 c

 DSC101

 Systems Ergonomics

 20

 1

o

DSC112

 Designing Products for People

 20

 2

 o

 DSC031

 The Global Studio

 10

 1

 o

 BSC522

 Entrepreneurship & Innovation

 10

 1

 o

 DSC114

 Inclusive Design, Ageing, Disability and Vulnerability

 10

 1

 o

 DSC117

 Driving and Vehicle Ergonomics

10

 1

 o

 DSC029*

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice:  Prototyping and Evaluation

 35

 2

 c

 DSC030*

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice: Research and Evaluation

 35

 2

 c

 *Students must select from either DSC029 or DSC030 depending upon the nature of their DSC028 Final Year Design Ergonomics Practice: Product Development module

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 45)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 35)

4.4.1 Permissible Option combinations

Any combination of modules to a total of 40 credits, with no more than 25 credits in Semester 1.           

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) [2012 and 2013 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/ DIntS
Programme title Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)
Programme code DSUB07
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code J920, J921
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/ergonomicshumanfactorsdesign/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide a high quality honours programme which maximises students’ opportunities to graduate with a good degree and enhance their employability.
  • to equip students with the skills and knowledge which would enable them to work as professional ergonomists within industry and carry out research within academia and other research environments;
  • to enable students to acquire a range of quantitative and qualitative research skills and methods for investigating human safety, health, comfort and performance;

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Quality Assurance Agency’s framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (August, 2008);
  • requirements of the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors which undertakes annual monitoring, and performs a full review once every five years;
  • requirements of the International Ergonomics Association;

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed:

K1 - A systematic understanding of key aspects of ergonomics, broadly covering anatomical, physiological and psychological aspects of the design of work environments including their comfort, efficiency, productivity and safety;

K2- An ability to deploy accurately established methods and techniques of analysis and enquiry within ergonomics;

K3 - The ability to devise and solve problems using ideas and techniques from ergonomics, some of which are at the forefront of developments within the discipline;

K4 - The ability to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research, or equivalent advanced scholarship, in the discipline.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1 - demonstrate evidence-based reasoning and make critical judgements about ergonomic issues;

C2 - demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge gained in one area to a cognate problem in another area;

C3 - detect meaningful patterns in biological and psychological data, and evaluate their significance;

C4 - analyse and present the outcomes of investigations within ergonomics with confidence, based on sound quantitative and qualitative evidence;

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1 - Analyse and critically evaluate information obtained from studies within ergonomics, including published research or reports;

P2 - observe, record accurately and give an objective account of human work-related activity in both laboratory and real-world settings;

P3 - collect and organise quantitative data for statistical analysis, and abstract relevant information from this analysis;

P4 - collect and interpret qualitative data rigorously, and abstract relevant information;

P5 - initiate, design, conduct and report an empirically-based project under appropriate supervision, recognising its theoretical, practical and methodological implications and limitations;

P6 - understand the ethical context of Ergonomics as a discipline and demonstrate this in relation to their own empirical work.

P7 - recognise and apply subject-specific theories, frameworks, concepts or principles;

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1 - use instructional material (eg, experimental demonstrations) and research tools (e.g,. computer-based statistical packages), and conduct literature searches using databases and other resources on the internet;

T2 - collect data in numerical form, present it in tables and graphs, and analyse it with a range of statistical tools;

T3 - clarify questions, consider alternative solutions and evaluate outcomes;

T4 - manage a project; control meetings, write reports, demonstrate key skills, understand training and skills issues;

T5- share responsibility for a task with others; agree common goals and methods to achieve them; co-ordinate the use of common resources;

T6 - write or speak clearly to topic; to draft, edit and polish presentations; to contribute actively to group discussion; communicate to both peers and teachers; in writing and orally;

T7 - Seek out sources of information, plan time to make the best use of resources and review priorities in the light of deadlines.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design

10

1+2

c

DSA102

Ergonomics in Design of Everyday Artefacts

10

2

c

DSA103

The Body At Work

10

2

c

DSA104

Introduction to Environmental Ergonomics

10

2

c

DSA105

Introduction to Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSA111

Study Skills

10

1

c

DSA112

Anatomy

10

1

c

DSA113

Physiology

10

2

c

DSA114

The Mind At Work

20

1

c

PSA310

Basic Environmental Psychology

20

2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 50)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 60)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB102

Ergonomics in Design of Multi-User Systems

10

2

c

DSB103

Vision

10

1

c

DSB104

Thermal Environment

10

2

c

DSB119

User Experience Design (Ergonomics)

10

2

c

DSB105

Human Response to Noise & Vibration

10

1

c

DSB106

Qualtitative Methods

10

2

c

DSB108

Cognitive Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSB111

Ergonomics & Development of Complex Systems/Services

10

2

c

DSB118

Ergonomics of HCI

10

1

c

PSB314

Organisational Behaviour

10

1

c

DSB113

Study Design & Data Analysis

10

1

c

DSB112

Ergonomics Experimental Analysis

10

2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 60)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 60)

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC100

Project

40

1+2

c

DSC101

Systems Ergonomics

20

1

c

DSC112

Designing Products for People

20

2

o

DSC114

Inclusive Design, Ageing, Disability and Vulnerability

10

1

o

DSC117

Driver & Vehicle Ergonomics

10

1

o

PSC219

Human Performance at Environmental Extremes

20

1

o

PSC315

Psychology & Health

20

2

o

PSC316

Applied Psychology and Human Resources Management

20

2

o

 

One Part C module from the University undergraduate catalogue, subject to the approval of the Programme Director

 

 

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 40) – the project module has permitted weight distribution of 10:30 or 20:20.

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)

Optional modules in Semester 1 must bring the total modular weight to 50, 60 or 70.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology [2012 and 2013 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The Institute of Engineering Designers (IED)

Final award BA (Hons)/ BA (Hons) + DIntS/ DPS
Programme title Industrial Design & Technology
Programme code DSUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code H775, H776
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/industrialdesignandtechnology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing, with particular attention to the practitioners, the principles and practice of industrial design and their technological bases;

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to the needs of industrial design and technology;

To develop and foster imaginative and creative abilities, both individually and in teams;

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate modelling methods to design development, and to design and predict the performance of electronic and mechanical systems relevant to industrial design products;

For students to be better able to recognise, contextualise and discuss the significance and implications of design activity and its outcomes;

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;

To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Art and Design, and Engineering.

The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate: 

K1 - Knowledge and understanding of design methodology and the context of design activity.      

K2 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues concerned with industrial design requirements, including technical and functional issues, product semantics, aesthetic and styling issues, emotional dimensions, sustainable development and ecodesign strategies, ergonomics and user interaction.           

K3 - Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of planning extended enquiries, user evaluations and technical evaluations.          

K4 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of prototyping and commercial manufacturing processes, and how to estimate product costs.          

K5 - Knowledge and understanding of technical requirements concerned with the functional elements of a product’s design, including a basic understanding of electronic and mechanical systems, and materials.  

K6 - Knowledge and understanding of how computer-based tools may be used to enhance and support design activities, particularly how 3D CAD modelling and computer based manufacturing/prototyping can be used as a foundation for downstream activities.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:  

C1 - Analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy.

C2 - Develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group.

C3 - Identify and use appropriate resources to support designing, including basic electronic, mechanical and computer-based systems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:  

P1 - Apply appropriate media and modelling techniques at various phases of a design process.

P2 - Produce sketch, CAD, rendered, detailed part and General Assembly (GA) drawings of design proposals.

P3 - Make prototype models suitable for evaluation by users, and make jigs and tools to support both prototype and commercial manufacture.

P4 - Plan and execute the evaluation of proposed design products, analysing the outcome and proposing suitable modifications.

P5 - Use basic mathematics, electronic simulation tools and graphical methods to simulate and design electronic and mechanical systems.

P6 - Relate and incorporate the technical design requirements to those of a complete product.

P7 - Use 3D CAD modelling systems, and other specialised software applications, to visualise, develop and analyse the design of a product.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1 - Articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms.

T2 - Interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team.

T3 - Identify and retrieve information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue.

T4 - Demonstrate competence with information technology (IT), using a range of different software tools.

T5 - Manage their own time relative to a required task and associated deadline.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Context

10

1

c

DSA004

Foundation Technology

20

1+2

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping of Design

20

1+2

c

DSA009

Industrial Design Studies 1

10

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design 1

10

1+2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 70)

 4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB001

Year 2 Design Practice

25

1+2

c

DSB009

Industrial Design Studies 2

30

1+2

c

DSB014

Design Communication

15

1+2

c

DSB015

BA Design & Manufacturing Technologies

30

1+2

c

DSB010

Universal Design

20

1+2

o

DSB011

Physical & Virtual Prototyping in Design

20

1+2

o

DSB012

Teaching Design & Technology

20

1+2

o

DSB013

Sustainable Design

20

1+2

o

DSB017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

20

1+2

o

DSB022

User Experience Design

20

1+2

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the
Programme Director.

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Industrial Design & Technology with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Industrial Design & Technology with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC009

Industrial Design Studies 3

20

1

c

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

c

DSC026

Final Year Design Practice

60

1+2

c

DSC005

Live Projects

10 

1+2 

 c

DSC010

Universal Design

10

1

o

DSC017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

10

1

o

DSC022

User Experience Design

10

1

o

DSC025

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (CAMM)

10

1

o

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

o

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)
Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 90)
Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the
Programme Director.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

 

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Product Design and Technology [2012 and 2013 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Institution of Engineering Designers (IED) with registration of IEng with the UK Engineering Council

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Product Design and Technology
Programme code DSUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code HJ7X, HJ79
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/productdesignandtechnology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing, with particular attention to the practitioners, the principles and practice of product design and their technological bases;

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to the needs of product design and technology;

To develop and foster imaginative and creative abilities, both individually and in teams;

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate modelling methods to design development, and to design and predict the performance of electronic and mechanical systems relevant to industrial design products;

For students to be better able to recognise, contextualise and discuss the significance and implications of design activity and its outcomes;

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;

To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Art and Design, and Engineering.

 The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate:  

K1 - Knowledge and understanding of design methodology and the context of design activity.      

K2 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues concerned with industrial design requirements, including technical and functional issues, product semantics, aesthetic and styling issues, emotional dimensions, sustainable development and ecodesign strategies, ergonomics and user interaction.           

K3 - Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of planning extended enquiries, user evaluations and technical evaluations.          

K4 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of prototyping and commercial manufacturing processes, and how to estimate product costs.          

K5 - Knowledge and understanding of technical requirements concerned with the functional elements of a product’s design, including a basic understanding of electronic and mechanical systems, and materials. 

K6 - Knowledge and understanding of how computer-based tools may be used to enhance and support design activities, particularly how 3D CAD modelling and computer based manufacturing/prototyping can be used as a foundation for downstream activities.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

C1 - Analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy.

C2 - Develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group.

C3 - Identify and use appropriate resources to support designing, including electronic, mechanical and computer-based systems.

C4 - Apply suitable numerical methods to solve basic engineering/technological problems and use scientific principles in the modelling and analysis of electronic and mechanical systems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

P1 - Apply appropriate media and modelling techniques at various phases of a design process.

P2 - Produce sketch, CAD, rendered, detailed part and General Assembly (GA) drawings of design proposals.

P3 - Make prototype models suitable for evaluation by users, and make jigs and tools to support both prototype and commercial manufacture.

P4 - Plan and execute the evaluation of proposed design products, analysing the outcome and proposing suitable modifications.

P5 - Use mathematics, electronic simulation tools and graphical methods to simulate and design electronic and mechanical systems.

P6 - Relate and incorporate the technical design requirements to those of a complete product.

P7 - Use 3D CAD modelling systems, and other specialised software applications, to visualise, develop and analyse the design of a product.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

T1 - Articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms.

T2 - Interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team.

T3 - Identify and retrieve information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue.

T4 - Demonstrate competence with information technology (IT), using a range of different software tools.

T5 - Manage their own time relative to a required task and associated deadline.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Context

10

1

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping of Design

20

1+2

c

DSA007

Electronics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA008

Mechanics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design 1

10

1+2

c

MPA100

Materials and Processes for Designers

10

1+2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 70)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB001

Year 2 Design Practice

25

1+2

c

DSB007

Further Electronics for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB008

Further Mechanics for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB014

Design Communication

15

1+2

c

DSB016

BSc Design & Manufacturing Technologies

30

1+2

c

DSB010

Universal Design

20

1+2

o

DSB012

Teaching Design & Technology

20

1+2

o

DSB013

Sustainable Design

20

1+2

o

DSB017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

20

1+2

o

DSB022

User Experience Design

20

1+2

o

MPB202

Polymer Processing & Applications

20

1+2

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC006

Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design

20

1

c

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

c

DSC026

Final Year Design Practice

60

1+2

c

DSC005

Live Projects

10 

1+2 

c

DSC017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

10

1

o

DSC020

Design Competition

10

1

o

DSC022

User Experience Design

10

1

o

DSC025

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (CAMM)

10

1

o

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

o

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

o

MPC101

Recycling & Environmental Issues

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 90)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

5.1          In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits including Electronics for Design (DSA007) and Mechanics for Design (DSA008);

5.2          In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated at least 200 credits, of which 100 shall be from Part B,  including Further Electronics for Design (DSB007) and Further Mechanics for Design (DSB008);

5.3          In order to qualify for the award of an Honours Degree, candidates must have accumulated 300 credits, of which 100 shall be from degree level modules taken in Part C including Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design (DSC006);

5.4          In addition, a minimum of 30% is required in all modules, in all parts of the programme.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology [2014, 2015 and 2016 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The Institute of Engineering Designers (IED)

Final award BA (Hons)/ BA (Hons) + DIntS/ DPS
Programme title Industrial Design & Technology
Programme code DSUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code H775, H776
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/industrialdesignandtechnology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing, with particular attention to the practitioners, the principles and practice of industrial design and their technological bases;

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to the needs of industrial design and technology;

To develop and foster imaginative and creative abilities, both individually and in teams;

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate modelling methods to design development, and to design and predict the performance of electronic and mechanical systems relevant to industrial design products;

For students to be better able to recognise, contextualise and discuss the significance and implications of design activity and its outcomes;

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;

To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Art and Design, and Engineering.

The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate: 

K1 - Knowledge and understanding of design methodology and the context of design activity.      

K2 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues concerned with industrial design requirements, including technical and functional issues, product semantics, aesthetic and styling issues, emotional dimensions, sustainable development and ecodesign strategies, ergonomics and user interaction.           

K3 - Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of planning extended enquiries, user evaluations and technical evaluations.          

K4 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of prototyping and commercial manufacturing processes, and how to estimate product costs.          

K5 - Knowledge and understanding of technical requirements concerned with the functional elements of a product’s design, including a basic understanding of electronic and mechanical systems, and materials.  

K6 - Knowledge and understanding of how computer-based tools may be used to enhance and support design activities, particularly how 3D CAD modelling and computer based manufacturing/prototyping can be used as a foundation for downstream activities.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:  

C1 - Analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy.

C2 - Develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group.

C3 - Identify and use appropriate resources to support designing, including basic electronic, mechanical and computer-based systems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:  

P1 - Apply appropriate media and modelling techniques at various phases of a design process.

P2 - Produce sketch, CAD, rendered, detailed part and General Assembly (GA) drawings of design proposals.

P3 - Make prototype models suitable for evaluation by users, and make jigs and tools to support both prototype and commercial manufacture.

P4 - Plan and execute the evaluation of proposed design products, analysing the outcome and proposing suitable modifications.

P5 - Use basic mathematics, electronic simulation tools and graphical methods to simulate and design electronic and mechanical systems.

P6 - Relate and incorporate the technical design requirements to those of a complete product.

P7 - Use 3D CAD modelling systems, and other specialised software applications, to visualise, develop and analyse the design of a product.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1 - Articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms.

T2 - Interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team.

T3 - Identify and retrieve information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue.

T4 - Demonstrate competence with information technology (IT), using a range of different software tools.

T5 - Manage their own time relative to a required task and associated deadline.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Context

10

1

c

DSA004

Foundation Technology

20

1+2

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping of Design

20

1+2

c

DSA009

Industrial Design Studies 1

10

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design 1

10

1+2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 70)

 4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB001

Year 2 Design Practice

25

1+2

c

DSB009

Industrial Design Studies 2

30

1+2

c

DSB014

Design Communication

15

1+2

c

DSB015

BA Design & Manufacturing Technologies

30

1+2

c

DSB010

Universal Design

20

1+2

o

DSB011

Physical & Virtual Prototyping in Design

20

1+2

o

DSB013

Sustainable Design

20

1+2

o

DSB017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

20

1+2

o

DSB022

User Experience Design

20

1+2

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the
Programme Director.

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Industrial Design & Technology with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Industrial Design & Technology with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC009

Industrial Design Studies 3

20

1

c

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

c

DSC026

Final Year Design Practice

60

1+2

c

DSC005

Live Projects

10 

1+2 

c

DSC010

Universal Design

10

1

o

DSC017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

10

1

o

DSC022

User Experience Design

10

1

o

DSC025

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (CAMM)

10

1

o

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

o

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)
Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 90)
Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the
Programme Director.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

 

5.1  In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits including Foundation Technology - BA Route (DSA004).

 

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

 

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics [2014 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Design Ergonomics
Programme code DSUB10
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS)or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code J923, J922
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/designergonomics/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing with particular attention to human factors

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to user centred product development

To enable students to develop a range of conceptual, practical and professional skills that reflect a synthesis of product design and ergonomics

To develop and foster imaginative, creative and scientific abilities, both individually and in teams

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate methods to identify user needs and abilities and critically evaluate products that require human interaction

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation

To promote an understanding of, and examine the opportunities for, professional practice

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

QAA Benchmark Statements for Art and Design

The Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors - Accreditation

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of …

K1 -   design methodology, the context of design activity, and the role of the designer within professional practice

K2 -   the role of ergonomics and human factors within design practice

K3 -   a user centred approach to design

K4 -   human needs, variability, capability and limitations

K5 -   the role of product form and the semantic impression generated

K6 -   the principles and practice of extended enquiries and user evaluations

K7 -   2d and 3d modelling in both analogue and digital media and their role within product development

K8 -   experimental design, data processing and presentation

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1 - analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy

C2 - demonstrate evidence based reasoning and make critical judgements about arguments in ergonomics and design

C3 - develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group

C4 - identify suitable ergonomics techniques and the appropriate stages where they may be used to support the design process

C5 - demonstrate substantial competence in research skills through practical activities

C6 - analyse quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design

C7 - analyse human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology

C8 - understand the ethical context of psychology and ergonomics as a discipline and demonstrate this in relation to their own empirical work

C9 - identify appropriate 2d and 3d prototyping techniques to support design activity

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1 -   design appropriate evaluations, process quantitative and qualitative data and apply findings in an iterative design process

P2 -   present quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design

P3 -   measure human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology

P4 -   apply ergonomics to real world design situations

P5 -   apply a broad range of 2d and 3d modelling and presentation techniques in both analogue and digital forms to support design activity

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to …

G1 - use creativity and innovation in problem solving

G2 - work within contexts of ambiguity, uncertainty, and unfamiliarity

G3 - reflect upon and present ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms

G4 - interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team

G5 - manage self learning including efficient time management and the ability to meet deadlines

G6 -  identify, retrieve and analyse information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue

G7 -demonstrate competence with information technology, using a range of different software tools

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

 

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Contexts

10

1

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping for Design

20

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design

10

1+2

c

DSA104

Introduction to Environmental Ergonomics

10

2

c

DSA105

Introduction to Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSA112

Anatomy

10

1

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 50)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 40)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

 

 DSB010

Universal Design

 20

 1+2

 c

 DSB013

 Sustainable Design

 20

 1+2

 o

 DSB018

 Year 2 Design Ergonomics Practice

 30

 1+2

 c

 DSB102

 Ergonomics in the Design of Multi-

 user Systems

 10

 2

 c

 DSB103

 Vision

 10

 1

 o

 DSB105

 Human Response to Noise &  

 Vibration

 10

 1

 o

 DSB106

 Qualitative Methods

 10

 2

c

 DSB108

 Cognitive Ergonomics

 10

 1

 c

 DSB118

 Human Computer Interaction

 10

 1

 c

 DSB113

Study Design  & Data Analysis

 10

 1

 c

 DSA103

 The Body At Work

 10

 2

 o

 DSB104

 Thermal Environment

 10

2

 o

DSB120

Legal Framework to the Design of Products and Workplaces

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 50)

4.2.1 Permissible Option combinations

                       

Semester 1

Semester 2

20 Weight Module

OR

10 Weight Module

10 Weight module

 OR

                                                                     2X10 Weight modules in Sem 2

 

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Design Ergonomics with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Design Ergonomics with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

 

 DSC017

 Computer-aided Ergonomics

 10

 1

 c

 DSC005

 Live Projects

 10

 1+2

 o

 DSC021

 Design Research

 20

 1+2

 o

 DSC022

User Experience Design

 10

 1

 c

 DSC028

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice:  Product Development

 25

 1

 c

 DSC101

 Systems Ergonomics

 20

 1

o

DSC112

 Designing Products for People

 20

 2

 o

 DSC031

 The Global Studio

 10

 1

 o

 BSC522

 Entrepreneurship & Innovation

 10

 1

 o

 DSC114

 Inclusive Design, Ageing, Disability and Vulnerability

 10

 1

 o

 DSC117

 Driving and Vehicle Ergonomics

10

 1

 o

 DSC029*

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice:  Prototyping and Evaluation

 35

 2

 c

 DSC030*

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice: Research and Evaluation

 35

 2

 c

 *Students must select from either DSC029 or DSC030 depending upon the nature of their DSC028 Final Year Design Ergonomics Practice: Product Development module

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 45)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 35)

4.4.1 Permissible Option combinations

Any combination of modules to a total of 40 credits, with no more than 25 credits in Semester 1.           

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) [2014 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/ DIntS
Programme title Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)
Programme code DSUB07
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code J920, J921
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/ergonomicshumanfactorsdesign/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide a high quality honours programme which maximises students’ opportunities to graduate with a good degree and enhance their employability.
  • to equip students with the skills and knowledge which would enable them to work as professional ergonomists within industry and carry out research within academia and other research environments;
  • to enable students to acquire a range of quantitative and qualitative research skills and methods for investigating human safety, health, comfort and performance;

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Quality Assurance Agency’s framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (August, 2008);
  • requirements of the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors which undertakes annual monitoring, and performs a full review once every five years;
  • requirements of the International Ergonomics Association;

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed:

K1 - A systematic understanding of key aspects of ergonomics, broadly covering anatomical, physiological and psychological aspects of the design of work environments including their comfort, efficiency, productivity and safety;

K2- An ability to deploy accurately established methods and techniques of analysis and enquiry within ergonomics;

K3 - The ability to devise and solve problems using ideas and techniques from ergonomics, some of which are at the forefront of developments within the discipline;

K4 - The ability to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research, or equivalent advanced scholarship, in the discipline.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1 - demonstrate evidence-based reasoning and make critical judgements about ergonomic issues;

C2 - demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge gained in one area to a cognate problem in another area;

C3 - detect meaningful patterns in biological and psychological data, and evaluate their significance;

C4 - analyse and present the outcomes of investigations within ergonomics with confidence, based on sound quantitative and qualitative evidence;

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1 - Analyse and critically evaluate information obtained from studies within ergonomics, including published research or reports;

P2 - observe, record accurately and give an objective account of human work-related activity in both laboratory and real-world settings;

P3 - collect and organise quantitative data for statistical analysis, and abstract relevant information from this analysis;

P4 - collect and interpret qualitative data rigorously, and abstract relevant information;

P5 - initiate, design, conduct and report an empirically-based project under appropriate supervision, recognising its theoretical, practical and methodological implications and limitations;

P6 - understand the ethical context of Ergonomics as a discipline and demonstrate this in relation to their own empirical work.

P7 - recognise and apply subject-specific theories, frameworks, concepts or principles;

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1 - use instructional material (eg, experimental demonstrations) and research tools (e.g,. computer-based statistical packages), and conduct literature searches using databases and other resources on the internet;

T2 - collect data in numerical form, present it in tables and graphs, and analyse it with a range of statistical tools;

T3 - clarify questions, consider alternative solutions and evaluate outcomes;

T4 - manage a project; control meetings, write reports, demonstrate key skills, understand training and skills issues;

T5- share responsibility for a task with others; agree common goals and methods to achieve them; co-ordinate the use of common resources;

T6 - write or speak clearly to topic; to draft, edit and polish presentations; to contribute actively to group discussion; communicate to both peers and teachers; in writing and orally;

T7 - Seek out sources of information, plan time to make the best use of resources and review priorities in the light of deadlines.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design

10

1+2

c

DSA102

Ergonomics in Design of Everyday Artefacts

10

2

c

DSA103

The Body At Work

10

2

c

DSA104

Introduction to Environmental Ergonomics

10

2

c

DSA105

Introduction to Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSA111

Study Skills

10

1

c

DSA112

Anatomy

10

1

c

DSA113

Physiology

10

2

c

DSA114

The Mind At Work

20

1

c

PSA310

Basic Environmental Psychology

20

2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 50)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 60)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB102

Ergonomics in Design of Multi-User Systems

10

2

c

DSB103

Vision

10

1

c

DSB104

Thermal Environment

10

2

c

DSB119

User Experience Design (Ergonomics)

10

2

c

DSB105

Human Response to Noise & Vibration

10

1

c

DSB106

Qualtitative Methods

10

2

c

DSB108

Cognitive Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSB111

Ergonomics & Development of Complex Systems/Services

10

2

c

DSB118

Ergonomics of HCI

10

1

c

DSB120

Legal Framework to the Design of Products and Workplaces

10

1

c

DSB113

Study Design & Data Analysis

10

1

c

DSB112

Ergonomics Experimental Analysis

10

2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 60)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 60)

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC100

Project

40

1+2

c

DSC101

Systems Ergonomics

20

1

c

DSC112

Designing Products for People

20

2

o

DSC114

Inclusive Design, Ageing, Disability and Vulnerability

10

1

o

DSC117

Driver & Vehicle Ergonomics

10

1

o

PSC219

Human Performance at Environmental Extremes

20

1

o

PSC315

Psychology & Health

20

2

o

PSC316

Applied Psychology and Human Resources Management

20

2

o

 

One Part C module from the University undergraduate catalogue, subject to the approval of the Programme Director

 

 

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 40) – the project module has permitted weight distribution of 10:30 or 20:20.

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)

Optional modules in Semester 1 must bring the total modular weight to 50, 60 or 70.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Product Design and Technology [2014 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Institution of Engineering Designers (IED) with registration of IEng with the UK Engineering Council

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Product Design and Technology
Programme code DSUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code HJ7X, HJ79
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/productdesignandtechnology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing, with particular attention to the practitioners, the principles and practice of product design and their technological bases;

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to the needs of product design and technology;

To develop and foster imaginative and creative abilities, both individually and in teams;

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate modelling methods to design development, and to design and predict the performance of electronic and mechanical systems relevant to industrial design products;

For students to be better able to recognise, contextualise and discuss the significance and implications of design activity and its outcomes;

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;

To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Art and Design, and Engineering.

 The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate:  

K1 - Knowledge and understanding of design methodology and the context of design activity.      

K2 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues concerned with industrial design requirements, including technical and functional issues, product semantics, aesthetic and styling issues, emotional dimensions, sustainable development and ecodesign strategies, ergonomics and user interaction.           

K3 - Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of planning extended enquiries, user evaluations and technical evaluations.          

K4 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of prototyping and commercial manufacturing processes, and how to estimate product costs.          

K5 - Knowledge and understanding of technical requirements concerned with the functional elements of a product’s design, including a basic understanding of electronic and mechanical systems, and materials. 

K6 - Knowledge and understanding of how computer-based tools may be used to enhance and support design activities, particularly how 3D CAD modelling and computer based manufacturing/prototyping can be used as a foundation for downstream activities.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

C1 - Analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy.

C2 - Develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group.

C3 - Identify and use appropriate resources to support designing, including electronic, mechanical and computer-based systems.

C4 - Apply suitable numerical methods to solve basic engineering/technological problems and use scientific principles in the modelling and analysis of electronic and mechanical systems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

P1 - Apply appropriate media and modelling techniques at various phases of a design process.

P2 - Produce sketch, CAD, rendered, detailed part and General Assembly (GA) drawings of design proposals.

P3 - Make prototype models suitable for evaluation by users, and make jigs and tools to support both prototype and commercial manufacture.

P4 - Plan and execute the evaluation of proposed design products, analysing the outcome and proposing suitable modifications.

P5 - Use mathematics, electronic simulation tools and graphical methods to simulate and design electronic and mechanical systems.

P6 - Relate and incorporate the technical design requirements to those of a complete product.

P7 - Use 3D CAD modelling systems, and other specialised software applications, to visualise, develop and analyse the design of a product.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

T1 - Articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms.

T2 - Interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team.

T3 - Identify and retrieve information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue.

T4 - Demonstrate competence with information technology (IT), using a range of different software tools.

T5 - Manage their own time relative to a required task and associated deadline.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Context

10

1

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping of Design

20

1+2

c

DSA007

Electronics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA008

Mechanics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design 1

10

1+2

c

MPA100

Materials and Processes for Designers

10

1+2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 70)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB001

Year 2 Design Practice

25

1+2

c

DSB007

Further Electronics for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB008

Further Mechanics for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB014

Design Communication

15

1+2

c

DSB016

BSc Design & Manufacturing Technologies

30

1+2

c

DSB010

Universal Design

20

1+2

o

DSB013

Sustainable Design

20

1+2

o

DSB017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

20

1+2

o

DSB022

user Experience Design

20

1+2

o

MPB202

Polymer Processing & Applications

20

1+2

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC006

Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design

20

1

c

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

c

DSC026

Final Year Design Practice

60

1+2

c

DSC005

Live Projects

10 

1+2 

c

DSC010

Universal Design

10

1

o

DSC017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

10

1

o

DSC022

User Experience Design

10

1

o

DSC025

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (CAMM)

10

1

o

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

o

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

o

MPC101

Recycling & Environmental Issues

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 90)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

5.1          In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits including Electronics for Design (DSA007) and Mechanics for Design (DSA008);

5.2          In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated at least 200 credits, of which 100 shall be from Part B,  including Further Electronics for Design (DSB007) and Further Mechanics for Design (DSB008);

5.3          In order to qualify for the award of an Honours Degree, candidates must have accumulated 300 credits, of which 100 shall be from degree level modules taken in Part C including Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design (DSC006);

5.4          In addition, a minimum of 30% is required in all modules, in all parts of the programme.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Design Ergonomics [2015 and 2016 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Chartered Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Design Ergonomics
Programme code DSUB10
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code J923, J922
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/designergonomics/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing with particular attention to human factors

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to user centred product development

To enable students to develop a range of conceptual, practical and professional skills that reflect a synthesis of product design and ergonomics

To develop and foster imaginative, creative and scientific abilities, both individually and in teams

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate methods to identify user needs and abilities and critically evaluate products that require human interaction

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation

To promote an understanding of, and examine the opportunities for, professional practice

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

QAA Benchmark Statements for Art and Design

The Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors - Accreditation

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of …

K1 -   design methodology, the context of design activity, and the role of the designer within professional practice

K2 -   the role of ergonomics and human factors within design practice

K3 -   a user centred approach to design

K4 -   human needs, variability, capability and limitations

K5 -   the role of product form and the semantic impression generated

K6 -   the principles and practice of extended enquiries and user evaluations

K7 -   2d and 3d modelling in both analogue and digital media and their role within product development

K8 -   experimental design, data processing and presentation

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1 - analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy

C2 - demonstrate evidence based reasoning and make critical judgements about arguments in ergonomics and design

C3 - develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group

C4 - identify suitable ergonomics techniques and the appropriate stages where they may be used to support the design process

C5 - demonstrate substantial competence in research skills through practical activities

C6 - analyse quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design

C7 - analyse human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology

C8 - understand the ethical context of psychology and ergonomics as a discipline and demonstrate this in relation to their own empirical work

C9 - identify appropriate 2d and 3d prototyping techniques to support design activity

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1 -   design appropriate evaluations, process quantitative and qualitative data and apply findings in an iterative design process

P2 -   present quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design

P3 -   measure human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology

P4 -   apply ergonomics to real world design situations

P5 -   apply a broad range of 2d and 3d modelling and presentation techniques in both analogue and digital forms to support design activity

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to …

G1 - use creativity and innovation in problem solving

G2 - work within contexts of ambiguity, uncertainty, and unfamiliarity

G3 - reflect upon and present ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms

G4 - interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team

G5 - manage self learning including efficient time management and the ability to meet deadlines

G6 -  identify, retrieve and analyse information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue

G7 -demonstrate competence with information technology, using a range of different software tools

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

 

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Contexts

10

1

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping for Design

20

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design

10

1+2

c

DSA104

Introduction to Environmental Ergonomics

10

2

c

DSA105

Introduction to Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSA112

Anatomy

10

1

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 50)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 40)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

 

 DSB010

Universal Design

 20

 1+2

 c

 DSB013

 Sustainable Design

 20

 1+2

 o

 DSB018

 Year 2 Design Ergonomics Practice

 30

 1+2

 c

 DSB102

 Ergonomics in the Design of Multi-

 user Systems

 10

 2

 c

 DSB106

 Qualitative Methods

 10

 2

c

 DSB108

 Cognitive Ergonomics

 10

 1

 c

 DSB118

 Human Computer Interaction

 10

 1

 c

 DSB113

Study Design  & Data Analysis

 10

 1

 c

 DSA103

 The Body At Work

 10

 2

 o

 DSB121

Environmental Ergonomics and Design

20

1+2

 o

DSB120

Legal Framework to the Design of Products and Workplaces

10

1

o

DSB122

Product Design & Failure

10

2

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 50)

4.2.1 Permissible Option combinations

                       

Semester 1

Semester 2

20 Weight Module

OR

10 Weight Module

10 Weight module

 OR

                                                                     2X10 Weight modules in Sem 2

 

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Design Ergonomics with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Design Ergonomics with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

 

 DSC017

 Computer-aided Ergonomics

 10

 1

 c

 DSC005

 Live Projects

 10

 1+2

 o

 DSC021

 Design Research

 20

 1+2

 o

 DSC022

User Experience Design

 10

 1

 c

 DSC028

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice:  Product Development

 25

 1

 c

 DSC101

 Systems Ergonomics

 20

 1

o

DSC112

 Designing Products for People

 20

 2

 o

 DSC031

 The Global Studio

 10

 1

 o

 BSC522

 Entrepreneurship & Innovation

 10

 1

 o

 DSC114

 Inclusive Design, Ageing, Disability and Vulnerability

 10

 1

 o

 DSC117

 Driving and Vehicle Ergonomics

10

 1

 o

 DSC029*

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice:  Prototyping and Evaluation

 35

 2

 c

 DSC030*

 Final Year Design Ergonomics

Practice: Research and Evaluation

 35

 2

 c

 *Students must select from either DSC029 or DSC030 depending upon the nature of their DSC028 Final Year Design Ergonomics Practice: Product Development module

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 45)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 35)

4.4.1 Permissible Option combinations

Any combination of modules to a total of 40 credits, with no more than 25 credits in Semester 1.           

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) [2015 and 2016 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/ DIntS
Programme title Ergonomics (Human Factors Design)
Programme code DSUB07
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code J920, J921
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/ergonomicshumanfactorsdesign/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • to provide a high quality honours programme which maximises students’ opportunities to graduate with a good degree and enhance their employability.
  • to equip students with the skills and knowledge which would enable them to work as professional ergonomists within industry and carry out research within academia and other research environments;
  • to enable students to acquire a range of quantitative and qualitative research skills and methods for investigating human safety, health, comfort and performance;

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Quality Assurance Agency’s framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (August, 2008);
  • requirements of the Institute of Ergonomics and Human Factors which undertakes annual monitoring, and performs a full review once every five years;
  • requirements of the International Ergonomics Association;

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should have developed:

K1 - A systematic understanding of key aspects of ergonomics, broadly covering anatomical, physiological and psychological aspects of the design of work environments including their comfort, efficiency, productivity and safety;

K2- An ability to deploy accurately established methods and techniques of analysis and enquiry within ergonomics;

K3 - The ability to devise and solve problems using ideas and techniques from ergonomics, some of which are at the forefront of developments within the discipline;

K4 - The ability to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research, or equivalent advanced scholarship, in the discipline.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

C1 - demonstrate evidence-based reasoning and make critical judgements about ergonomic issues;

C2 - demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge gained in one area to a cognate problem in another area;

C3 - detect meaningful patterns in biological and psychological data, and evaluate their significance;

C4 - analyse and present the outcomes of investigations within ergonomics with confidence, based on sound quantitative and qualitative evidence;

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

P1 - Analyse and critically evaluate information obtained from studies within ergonomics, including published research or reports;

P2 - observe, record accurately and give an objective account of human work-related activity in both laboratory and real-world settings;

P3 - collect and organise quantitative data for statistical analysis, and abstract relevant information from this analysis;

P4 - collect and interpret qualitative data rigorously, and abstract relevant information;

P5 - initiate, design, conduct and report an empirically-based project under appropriate supervision, recognising its theoretical, practical and methodological implications and limitations;

P6 - understand the ethical context of Ergonomics as a discipline and demonstrate this in relation to their own empirical work.

P7 - recognise and apply subject-specific theories, frameworks, concepts or principles;

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1 - use instructional material (eg, experimental demonstrations) and research tools (e.g,. computer-based statistical packages), and conduct literature searches using databases and other resources on the internet;

T2 - collect data in numerical form, present it in tables and graphs, and analyse it with a range of statistical tools;

T3 - clarify questions, consider alternative solutions and evaluate outcomes;

T4 - manage a project; control meetings, write reports, demonstrate key skills, understand training and skills issues;

T5- share responsibility for a task with others; agree common goals and methods to achieve them; co-ordinate the use of common resources;

T6 - write or speak clearly to topic; to draft, edit and polish presentations; to contribute actively to group discussion; communicate to both peers and teachers; in writing and orally;

T7 - Seek out sources of information, plan time to make the best use of resources and review priorities in the light of deadlines.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design

10

1+2

c

DSA102

Ergonomics in Design of Everyday Artefacts

10

2

c

DSA103

The Body At Work

10

2

c

DSA104

Introduction to Environmental Ergonomics

10

2

c

DSA105

Introduction to Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSA111

Study Skills

10

1

c

DSA112

Anatomy

10

1

c

DSA113

Physiology

10

2

c

DSA114

The Mind At Work

20

1

c

PSA310

Basic Environmental Psychology

20

2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 50)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 60)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB102

Ergonomics in Design of Multi-User Systems

10

2

c

DSB121

Environmental Ergonomics and Design

20

1+2

c

DSB119

User Experience Design (Ergonomics)

10

2

c

DSB122

Product Design & Failure

10

2

c

DSB106

Qualtitative Methods

10

2

c

DSB108

Cognitive Ergonomics

10

1

c

DSB111

Ergonomics & Development of Complex Systems/Services

10

2

c

DSB118

Ergonomics of HCI

10

1

c

DSB120

Legal Framework to the Design of Products and Workplaces

10

1

c

DSB113

Study Design & Data Analysis

10

1

c

DSB112

Ergonomics Experimental Analysis

10

2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 40)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 60)

Compulsory modules in Semester 1+2 (total modular weight 20)

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Ergonomics (Human Factors Design) with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC100

Project

40

1+2

c

DSC101

Systems Ergonomics

20

1

c

DSC112

Designing Products for People

20

2

o

DSC114

Inclusive Design, Ageing, Disability and Vulnerability

10

1

o

DSC117

Driver & Vehicle Ergonomics

10

1

o

PSC219

Human Performance at Environmental Extremes

20

1

o

PSC315

Psychology & Health

20

2

o

 

One Part C module from the University undergraduate catalogue, subject to the approval of the Programme Director

 

 

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 40) – the project module has permitted weight distribution of 10:30 or 20:20.

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)

Optional modules in Semester 1 must bring the total modular weight to 50, 60 or 70.

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Product Design and Technology [2015 and 2016 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Institution of Engineering Designers (IED)

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Product Design and Technology
Programme code DSUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code HJ7X, HJ79
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/productdesignandtechnology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing, with particular attention to the practitioners, the principles and practice of product design and their technological bases;

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to the needs of product design and technology;

To develop and foster imaginative and creative abilities, both individually and in teams;

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate modelling methods to design development, and to design and predict the performance of electronic and mechanical systems relevant to industrial design products;

For students to be better able to recognise, contextualise and discuss the significance and implications of design activity and its outcomes;

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;

To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Art and Design, and Engineering.

 The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate:  

K1 - Knowledge and understanding of design methodology and the context of design activity.      

K2 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues concerned with industrial design requirements, including technical and functional issues, product semantics, aesthetic and styling issues, emotional dimensions, sustainable development and ecodesign strategies, ergonomics and user interaction.           

K3 - Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of planning extended enquiries, user evaluations and technical evaluations.          

K4 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of prototyping and commercial manufacturing processes, and how to estimate product costs.          

K5 - Knowledge and understanding of technical requirements concerned with the functional elements of a product’s design, including a basic understanding of electronic and mechanical systems, and materials. 

K6 - Knowledge and understanding of how computer-based tools may be used to enhance and support design activities, particularly how 3D CAD modelling and computer based manufacturing/prototyping can be used as a foundation for downstream activities.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

C1 - Analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy.

C2 - Develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group.

C3 - Identify and use appropriate resources to support designing, including electronic, mechanical and computer-based systems.

C4 - Apply suitable numerical methods to solve basic engineering/technological problems and use scientific principles in the modelling and analysis of electronic and mechanical systems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

P1 - Apply appropriate media and modelling techniques at various phases of a design process.

P2 - Produce sketch, CAD, rendered, detailed part and General Assembly (GA) drawings of design proposals.

P3 - Make prototype models suitable for evaluation by users, and make jigs and tools to support both prototype and commercial manufacture.

P4 - Plan and execute the evaluation of proposed design products, analysing the outcome and proposing suitable modifications.

P5 - Use mathematics, electronic simulation tools and graphical methods to simulate and design electronic and mechanical systems.

P6 - Relate and incorporate the technical design requirements to those of a complete product.

P7 - Use 3D CAD modelling systems, and other specialised software applications, to visualise, develop and analyse the design of a product.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

T1 - Articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms.

T2 - Interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team.

T3 - Identify and retrieve information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue.

T4 - Demonstrate competence with information technology (IT), using a range of different software tools.

T5 - Manage their own time relative to a required task and associated deadline.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA001

Design Practice 1

20

1

c

DSA002

Design Practice 2

20

2

c

DSA003

Design Context

10

1

c

DSA005

Computing for Designers 1

10

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping of Design

20

1+2

c

DSA007

Electronics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA008

Mechanics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA101

Ergonomics and Design 1

10

1+2

c

MPA100

Materials and Processes for Designers

10

1+2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 30)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 70)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB001

Year 2 Design Practice

25

1+2

c

DSB007

Electronics, Programming & Interfacing for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB008

Further Mechanics for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB014

Design Communication

15

1+2

c

DSB016

BSc Design & Manufacturing Technologies

30

1+2

c

DSB010

Universal Design

20

1+2

o

DSB013

Sustainable Design

20

1+2

o

DSB017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

20

1+2

o

DSB022

user Experience Design

20

1+2

o

MPB202

Polymer Processing & Applications

20

1+2

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC006

Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design

20

1

c

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

c

DSC026

Final Year Design Practice

60

1+2

c

DSC005

Live Projects

10 

1+2 

c

DSC010

Universal Design

10

1

o

DSC017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

10

1

o

DSC022

User Experience Design

10

1

o

DSC025

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (CAMM)

10

1

o

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

o

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

o

MPC101

Recycling & Environmental Issues

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 90)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

5.1          In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits including Electronics for Design (DSA007) and Mechanics for Design (DSA008);

5.2          In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated at least 200 credits, of which 100 shall be from Part B,  including Further Electronics for Design (DSB007) and Further Mechanics for Design (DSB008);

5.3          In order to qualify for the award of an Honours Degree, candidates must have accumulated 300 credits, of which 100 shall be from degree level modules taken in Part C including Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design (DSC006);

5.4          In addition, a minimum of 30% is required in all modules, in all parts of the programme.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) User Centred Design (2017 Entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title User Centred Design
Programme code DSUB11
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code W200, W201
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/design/user-centred-design/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

This programme specialises in understanding and accommodating the motivations, desires and capabilities of users, in all their forms, in the development of innovative products, services and systems. The emphasis of the programme targets design research evidenced based reasoning, and a range of human-centred methods to inform the design process. Students on this course will develop appropriate prototypes specifically designed to test and understand human performance and to inform the design of systems, services and interactive products.

In particular the curriculum aims to;

  • Advance the understanding of designing with particular attention to human factors;
  • Provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to user centred product development;
  • Develop a range of conceptual, practical and professional skills that reflects a synthesis of product design and ergonomics;
  • Develop and foster imaginative, creative and scientific abilities, both individually and in teams;
  • Provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate methods to identify user needs, motivations and abilities and critically evaluate products that require human interaction;
  • Develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;
  • Promote an understanding of, and examine the opportunities for, professional practice.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

 The Quality Assurance Agency’s framework for higher education qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (August, 2008);

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to understand: 

K1 - design methodology, the context of design activity, and the role of the designer within professional practice 

K2 - the synergy of design and people 

K3 - a user centred approach to design 

K4 - human needs, variability, capability and limitations 

K5 - anatomical, physiological and psychological aspects of humans to inform design practice 

K6 - the principles and practice of user research and its current limits 

K7 - 2d and 3d modelling and communication in both analogue and digital media and their role within design 

K8 - experimental design, data processing and presentation

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

C1 - demonstrate evidence based reasoning and make critical judgements about arguments in ergonomics and design 

C2 - develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group 

C3 - identify suitable user centred techniques and the appropriate stages where they may be used to support the design process 

C4 – evaluate and interpret quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design 

C5 - analyse human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology 

C6 - understand the ethical, cultural and legal contexts of working with and for people 

C7 - understand the selection and application of appropriate visualisation and communication techniques to support design activity

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

P1 - design appropriate evaluations, process quantitative and qualitative data and apply findings in an iterative design process 

P2 - employ user research techniques to support design activity; 

P3 - communicate quantitative and qualitative data relating to the user and / or design 

P4 – apply a user centred design process in response to a brief, to produce appropriate design solutions 

P5 - measure human variability and capability in terms of cognition and physiology 

P6 - apply a range of 2d and 3d modelling and presentation techniques in both analogue and digital forms to support design activity

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

G1 - use creativity and innovation in problem solving 

G2 - apply their skills and understanding in professional practice 

G3 – evaluate and reflect upon and present ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms 

G4 - interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team 

G5 – responsibly manage self-learning including efficient time management and the ability to meet deadlines 

G6 - identify, retrieve and analyse information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue 

G7 - demonstrate competence with information technology, using a range of different software tools 

G8 - demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge gained in one area to a cognate problem in another area

4. Programme structure

4. Programme structure 

4.1          Part A - Introductory Modules 

In the following tables, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

Compulsory or Optional

DSA200

Year 1 Design Practice

40

1+2

C

DSA201

Design Research & Professional Practice 1

20

1+2

C

DSA202

Prototyping for Evaluation

20

1+2

C

DSA203

User Centred Design

10

1+2

C

DSA204

Understanding Users - Physical

10

1

C

DSA205

Understanding Users - Cognitive

10

2

C

DSA206

The Environment of Use

10

1+2

C

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 10)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

  

4.2          Part B - Degree Modules 

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

Compulsory or Optional

DSB200

User Centred Design Practice 2

30

1+2

C

DSB201

Design Research & Professional Practice 2

20

1+2

C

DSB202

Design and Data Visualisation

20

1+2

C

DSB022

User Experience Design

20

1+2

C

DSB203

Virtual Product Evaluation

10

1+2

C

DSB204

Designing for Emotion

10

1

C

DSB205

Systems & Service Design

10

2

C

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 10)

Compulsory modules in Semester 2 (total modular weight 10)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100) 

 

4.3          Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only) 

Candidates on degree programme User Centred Design with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

 

Part I – Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only) 

Candidates on degree programme User Centred Design with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year. 

 

4.4          Part C - Degree Modules 

 

Code

 

Module title

 

Modular weight

 

Semester

 

Compulsory or Optional

DSC200

User Centred Design Practice 3

60

1+2

C

DSC201

Inclusive Design

20

1+2

C

DSC005

Live Projects

10

1+2

C

DSC202

Legal Aspects of Design

10

1+2

C

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

O

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

O

DSC117

Driver & Vehicle Ergonomics

10

1

O

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

O

DSC203

Advanced Environmental Interaction

10

2

O

DSC204

Human Factors in Intelligent Systems

10

2

O

 

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

 

4.4.1 Permissible Option combinations

 

Semester 1

 

Semester 2

 20 Weight Module (DSC021)

OR

 10 Weight Module

10 Weight Module

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

 

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits including Prototyping for Evaluation (DSA202).

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark

Programme Specification

DS BSc (Hons) Product Design and Technology [2017 Entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

Institution of Engineering Designers (IED)

Final award BSc (Hons)/ BSc (Hons) + DPS/DIntS
Programme title Product Design and Technology
Programme code DSUB01
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code HJ7X, HJ79
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/productdesignandtechnology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing, with particular attention to the practitioners, the principles and practice of product design and their technological bases;

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to the needs of product design and technology;

To develop and foster imaginative and creative abilities, both individually and in teams;

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate modelling methods to design development, and to design and predict the performance of electronic and mechanical systems relevant to industrial design products;

For students to be better able to recognise, contextualise and discuss the significance and implications of design activity and its outcomes;

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;

To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Art and Design, and Engineering.

 The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate:  

K1 - Knowledge and understanding of design methodology and the context of design activity.      

K2 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues concerned with industrial design requirements, including technical and functional issues, product semantics, aesthetic and styling issues, emotional dimensions, sustainable development and ecodesign strategies, ergonomics and user interaction.           

K3 - Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of planning extended enquiries, user evaluations and technical evaluations.          

K4 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of prototyping and commercial manufacturing processes, and how to estimate product costs.          

K5 - Knowledge and understanding of technical requirements concerned with the functional elements of a product’s design, including a basic understanding of electronic and mechanical systems, and materials. 

K6 - Knowledge and understanding of how computer-based tools may be used to enhance and support design activities, particularly how 3D CAD modelling and computer based manufacturing/prototyping can be used as a foundation for downstream activities.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

C1 - Analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy.

C2 - Develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group.

C3 - Identify and use appropriate resources to support designing, including electronic, mechanical and computer-based systems.

C4 - Apply suitable numerical methods to solve basic engineering/technological problems and use scientific principles in the modelling and analysis of electronic and mechanical systems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

P1 - Apply appropriate media and modelling techniques at various phases of a design process.

P2 - Produce sketch, CAD, rendered, detailed part and General Assembly (GA) drawings of design proposals.

P3 - Make prototype models suitable for evaluation by users, and make jigs and tools to support both prototype and commercial manufacture.

P4 - Plan and execute the evaluation of proposed design products, analysing the outcome and proposing suitable modifications.

P5 - Use mathematics, electronic simulation tools and graphical methods to simulate and design electronic and mechanical systems.

P6 - Relate and incorporate the technical design requirements to those of a complete product.

P7 - Use 3D CAD modelling systems, and other specialised software applications, to visualise, develop and analyse the design of a product.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

T1 - Articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms.

T2 - Interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team.

T3 - Identify and retrieve information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue.

T4 - Demonstrate competence with information technology (IT), using a range of different software tools.

T5 - Manage their own time relative to a required task and associated deadline.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules           

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA200

Year 1 Design Practice

40

1+2

c

DSA003

Design Context

10

1

c

DSA006

Prototyping of Design

20

1+2

c

DSA007

Electronics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA008

Mechanics for Design

10

1+2

c

DSA010

Design Research Methods 1

10

1+2

c

DSA203

User Centred Design

10

1+2

c

MPA100

Materials and Processes for Designers

10

1+2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 10)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 110)

4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB001

Year 2 Design Practice

25

1+2

c

DSB007

Electronics, Programming & Interfacing for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB008

Further Mechanics for Design

15

1+2

c

DSB014

Design Communication

15

1+2

c

DSB016

BSc Design & Manufacturing Technologies

30

1+2

c

DSB010

Universal Design

20

1+2

o

DSB013

Sustainable Design

20

1+2

o

DSB017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

20

1+2

o

DSB022

user Experience Design

20

1+2

o

MPB202

Polymer Processing & Applications

20

1+2

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Product Design & Technology with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC006

Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design

20

1

c

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

c

DSC026

Final Year Design Practice

60

1+2

c

DSC005

Live Projects

10 

1+2 

c

DSC010

Universal Design

10

1

o

DSC017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

10

1

o

DSC022

User Experience Design

10

1

o

DSC025

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (CAMM)

10

1

o

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

o

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

o

MPC101

Sustainability, Recycling & Environmental Issues

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 90)

Optional modules across Semester 1 (total modular weight 10)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the Programme Director.

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, from C to D (if applicable) and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also:

5.1          In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits including Prototyping for Design (DSA006), Electronics for Design (DSA007) and Mechanics for Design (DSA008);

5.2          In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated at least 200 credits, of which 100 shall be from Part B, including Further Electronics for Design (DSB007) and Further Mechanics for Design (DSB008);

5.3          In order to qualify for the award of an Honours Degree, candidates must have accumulated 300 credits, of which 100 shall be from degree level modules taken in Part C including Applications of Mechanics and Electronics for Design (DSC006);

5.4          In addition, a minimum of 30% is required in all modules, in all parts of the programme.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

Programme Specification

DS BA (Hons) Industrial Design & Technology [2017 entry]

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Loughborough Design School
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

The Institute of Engineering Designers (IED)

Final award BA (Hons)/ BA (Hons) + DIntS/ DPS
Programme title Industrial Design & Technology
Programme code DSUB03
Length of programme The duration of the programme is either six semesters, or eight semesters if students pursue a year’s exchange and/or placement in industry between Parts B and C with the objective of achieving a Diploma in Professional Studies (DPS) or Diploma in International Studies (DIntS).
UCAS code H775, H776
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/designschool/industrialdesignandtechnology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

To advance the understanding of designing, with particular attention to the practitioners, the principles and practice of industrial design and their technological bases;

To provide opportunities for students to develop skills, values and attributes, and to acquire knowledge and understanding, relevant to the needs of industrial design and technology;

To develop and foster imaginative and creative abilities, both individually and in teams;

To provide opportunities for students to develop and apply appropriate modelling methods to design development, and to design and predict the performance of electronic and mechanical systems relevant to industrial design products;

For students to be better able to recognise, contextualise and discuss the significance and implications of design activity and its outcomes;

To enable students to develop effective communication skills, including those required for verbal, visual and technical presentation;

To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

The Benchmark Statements for Art and Design, and Engineering.

The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate: 

K1 - Knowledge and understanding of design methodology and the context of design activity.      

K2 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of issues concerned with industrial design requirements, including technical and functional issues, product semantics, aesthetic and styling issues, emotional dimensions, sustainable development and ecodesign strategies, ergonomics and user interaction.           

K3 - Knowledge and understanding of the principles and practice of planning extended enquiries, user evaluations and technical evaluations.          

K4 - Knowledge and understanding of a range of prototyping and commercial manufacturing processes, and how to estimate product costs.          

K5 - Knowledge and understanding of technical requirements concerned with the functional elements of a product’s design, including a basic understanding of electronic and mechanical systems, and materials.  

K6 - Knowledge and understanding of how computer-based tools may be used to enhance and support design activities, particularly how 3D CAD modelling and computer based manufacturing/prototyping can be used as a foundation for downstream activities.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:  

C1 - Analyse design contexts and develop a design strategy.

C2 - Develop design ideas, as an individual and also as part of a group.

C3 - Identify and use appropriate resources to support designing, including basic electronic, mechanical and computer-based systems.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:  

P1 - Apply appropriate media and modelling techniques at various phases of a design process.

P2 - Produce sketch, CAD, rendered, detailed part and General Assembly (GA) drawings of design proposals.

P3 - Make prototype models suitable for evaluation by users, and make jigs and tools to support both prototype and commercial manufacture.

P4 - Plan and execute the evaluation of proposed design products, analysing the outcome and proposing suitable modifications.

P5 - Use basic mathematics, electronic simulation tools and graphical methods to simulate and design electronic and mechanical systems.

P6 - Relate and incorporate the technical design requirements to those of a complete product.

P7 - Use 3D CAD modelling systems, and other specialised software applications, to visualise, develop and analyse the design of a product.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

T1 - Articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms.

T2 - Interact effectively with others, working as a member of a small group or team.

T3 - Identify and retrieve information relevant to a proposition, discussion or issue.

T4 - Demonstrate competence with information technology (IT), using a range of different software tools.

T5 - Manage their own time relative to a required task and associated deadline.

4. Programme structure

4.1       Part A  - Introductory Modules

In the following table, ‘c’ indicates a compulsory module and ‘o’ indicates an optional module 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSA200

Year 1 Design Practice

40

1

c

DSA003

Design Context

10

1

c

DSA004

Technology in Industrial Design

20

1+2

c

DSA006

Prototyping of Design

20

1+2

c

DSA009

Industrial Design Studies 1

10

1+2

c

DSA010

Design Research Methods 1

10

1+2

c

DSA203

User Centred Design

10

1+2

c

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 10)

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 110)

 4.2       Part B  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSB001

Year 2 Design Practice

25

1+2

c

DSB009

Industrial Design Studies 2

30

1+2

c

DSB014

Design Communication

15

1+2

c

DSB015

BA Design & Manufacturing Technologies

30

1+2

c

DSB010

Universal Design

20

1+2

o

DSB011

Physical & Virtual Prototyping in Design

20

1+2

o

DSB013

Sustainable Design

20

1+2

o

DSB017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

20

1+2

o

DSB022

User Experience Design

20

1+2

o

Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 100)

Optional modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 20)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the
Programme Director.

4.3       Part I – Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Industrial Design & Technology with the Diploma in Professional Studies will undertake industrial/professional training.

Part I –  Overseas Study / Placement (8 semester programme only)

Candidates on degree programme Industrial Design & Technology with the Diploma in International Studies will undertake industrial/professional training for half the year and will study at one of the Design School’s approved academic institutions for the other half of the academic year.

4.4       Part C  - Degree Modules 

Code

Module title

Modular weight

Semester

Compulsory or Optional

DSC009

Industrial Design Studies 3

20

1

c

DSC021

Design Research

20

1+2

c

DSC026

Final Year Design Practice

60

1+2

c

DSC005

Live Projects

10 

1+2 

c

DSC010

Universal Design

10

1

o

DSC017

Computer-aided Ergonomics

10

1

o

DSC022

User Experience Design

10

1

o

DSC025

Computer Aided Modelling and Manufacture (CAMM)

10

1

o

DSC031

The Global Studio

10

1

o

BSC522

Entrepreneurship & Innovation

10

1

o

Compulsory modules in Semester 1 (total modular weight 20)
Compulsory modules across Semester 1 and Semester 2 (total modular weight 90)
Optional modules across Semester 1 (total modular weight 10)

Beyond these published provisions, any other proposed combination of modules must be approved by the
Programme Director.

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also: 

5.1 In order to progress from Part A to Part B, candidates must accumulate at least 100 credits including Technology in Industrial Design (DSA004), Prototyping of Design (DSA006) and Industrial Design Studies 1 (DSA009);

5.2 In order to progress from Part B to Part C, candidates must have accumulated at least 200 credits, of which 100 shall be from Part B, including Industrial Design Studies 2 (DSB009);

5.3  In order to qualify for the award of an Honours Degree, candidates must have accumulated 300 credits, of which 100 shall be from degree level modules taken in Part C including Industrial Design Studies 3 (DSC009);

 

5.4  In addition, a minimum of 30% is required in all modules, in all parts of the programme.

 

 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final percentage mark.

 

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