Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

SS BSc (Hons) Communications and Media Studies

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

N/A

Final award BSc/ BSc+DIntS / BSc+DPS
Programme title Communications and Media Studies
Programme code SSUB04
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time, BSc (Hons) DPS/DInts: 4 years full-time (including a 1 year placement)
UCAS code P910, P90A
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/socialsciences/communicationandmediastudies/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of the communication and media analyst.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to study communication and media in a multidisciplinary context where the value of interdisciplinary analysis is explored.
  • To enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of communication and media.
  • To enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in communication and media through specialist study and research.
  • To enable students to learn about the key concepts, theories and methods of communication and media.
  • To enable students to interpret and analyse communication/media processes and structures.
  • To enable students to compare different communication and media arrangements.
  • To enable students to address key issues in communication and media analysis and in society more generally.
  • To enable students to appreciate alternative perspectives in the social sciences.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Communication and Media Studies 

 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  • Knowledge of the major traditions of thought and analysis which have contributed to the study of media and communications. 
  • Knowledge of contemporary debates on appropriate frameworks and theories.
  • Knowledge of the major styles of research and investigation relevant to the study of media and communications, their strengths and weaknesses and epistemological underpinnings.
  • Understanding of the historical development of media and communicative practices and institutions.
  • Understanding of the inter-relations between media and communicative structures and practices and economic and political dynamics.
  • Understanding of how media organisations operate and of the ethical and policy issues posed by their practices. 
  • Understanding of the ways in which media and communicative forms construct the shared meanings that comprise public cultures and subcultures, and of the issues of representation these practices raise.
  • Understanding of the role of media and communications in the organisation of everyday life, social identities and belief systems.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of the programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  • Draw on ideas from a range of domains and disciplines and combine them productively. 
  • Critically appraise prevailing understandings of contemporary developments in media and communications and contribute effectively to the debates surrounding them.
  • Formulate appropriate research questions and employ appropriate methods and resources in addressing them.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Retrieve information from electronic and other sources and evaluate the materials collected critically. 
  • Demonstrate practical competence in using a range of qualitative and quantitative methods of research. 
  • Initiate, develop and realise a substantial self directed project (with appropriate guidance).
  • Participate effectively in group projects.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  • Gather, organise and deploy ideas and information in order to formulate arguments cogently and express them effectively in oral and written forms.
  • Organise and manage self-directed projects (with appropriate guidance).
  • Work individually, flexibly and independently showing self-discipline, self-direction and reflexivity. 
  • Work productively in a group or team, displaying at different times abilities to listen, contribute and lead effectively.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with relevant applications of Information Technology, including data analysis packages, and competence in using them. 
  • Deliver required work to a given length, format, brief and deadline. 
  • Consider and evaluate their own work in a reflexive manner.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code: SSUB04 

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme. In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits. In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B or a Study Abroad scheme at Part B.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A - Introductory Modules 

COMPULSORY MODULES (90 credits) 

Semester 1 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA301

Introduction to Communication & Media Studies

10

SSA307

Constructing Meaning: Texts and Audiences

10

SSA305

Foundation in Social Sciences

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semester 2 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA302

Introduction to Communication & Media Studies

10

SSA306

Media Landscapes

10

SSA308

Introduction to Critical Viewings

10

  

 

 

 

 

 

Semester 1 and 2 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA009

Introduction to Research Methods

30

    

 

 

 

OPTIONAL MODULES 

 

In addition to the above compulsory modules, students MUST choose 30 modular weights-worth of optional modules:

 

Semester 1 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

SSA156

Self and Identity

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology & Social Policy A

10

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semester 2 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

SSA158

Ideas and Controversies in Psychology

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology & Social Policy B

10

EUA614

Political Ideologies

10

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

  

 

 

 

Semesters 1 and 2 

Students can also choose other modules from the University’s Module Catalogue, approved by the Department of Social Sciences for inclusion in the programme, including languages in French, German, Spanish and Mandarin.

 

Part B - Degree Modules 

COMPULSORY MODULES (90 credits)

 Semester 1 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB301

Media Identity and Inequality

20

SSB317

Critical Viewings: Film

10

 Semester 2 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB303

Media and Social Change

20

SSB366

Promotional Culture

10

Semester 1 and 2 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB009

Advanced Research Methods

30

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take 30 credits worth of options across two semesters. A selection will be offered from the following list, plus language modules:

Semester 1

 Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB034

Surveillance Society

10

SSB128

Political Psychology

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

10

EUB630

British Politics

10

 Semester 2

 Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB023

Religion and Society

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

10

SSB239

Drugs: Society, Politics and Policy

10

SSB175

Psychological Disorders in Society

10

EUB604

Comparative European Politics

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part A.

10

Information for students wishing to take a Study Abroad or Placement Year

Study Abroad: Candidates have the opportunity to apply for permission to undertake an approved course of study at either a European university which is a member of the EU approved Erasmus Exchange programmes in the Department of Social Sciences or any other University with which the University has exchange study arrangements. Such a course of study must be undertaken in place of one Semester at Part B.

For students opting to take the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 2

Semester 1 Compulsory Modules total modular weight 50 credits:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB301

Media, Identity and Inequality

20

SSB317

Critical Viewings: Film

10

SSB393

Advanced Research Methods A (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB397

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB398

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB399

Study Abroad Module

70

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part A.

10

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 1.  A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the Part B list provided above.

For students opting to take the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 1

Semester 2 Compulsory modules total modular weight 50 credits:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB303

Media and Social Change

20

SSB366

Promotional Culture

10

SSB394

Advanced Research Methods B (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB397

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB398

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB399

Study Abroad Module

70

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 2. A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the Part B list provided above.

Part I:  Placement Year

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B. Two placement routes are available:

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.
  • Registration on the DIntS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Students opting for the Study Abroad scheme in Part B (4.2.2.) will only be allowed to undertake placement year (DIntS or DPS) in exceptional circumstances, and at the discretion of the Department.

 

Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC317

Critical Viewings: Documentary

10

SSC320

Presenting Media Debates

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC318

Critical Viewings: Television

10

SSC319

Digital Media and Society

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC399

Communication and Media Studies Project Dissertation

40

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take 40 credits worth of options across two semesters. A selection will be offered from the list below, plus language modules:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

SSC031

History of Ideas: Stereotyping the ‘Other’

20

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

SSC357

Producing the News

20

EUC604

State, Violence and Terrorism

20

EUC602

Nationalism: blood, soil and citizens

20

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC022

Body, Health and the Digital

20

SSC239

Green Criminology

20

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

SSC316

Media, Memory and History

20

EUC677

Britain and the EU

20

EUC658

Art, Politics and Society

20

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part B.

10

 

 

 

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

SS BSc (Hons) Criminology and Social Policy

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

N/A

Final award BSc/ BSc+DIntS / BSc+DPS
Programme title Criminology and Social Policy
Programme code SSUB03
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time, BSc (Hons) DPS/DInts: 4 years full-time (including a one-year placement)
UCAS code ML24, LL64
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/socialsciences/criminologyandsocialpolicy/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with an intellectually stimulating environment in which they can develop the necessary critical and practical skills for the analysis of criminology and social policy. 
  • To provide students with the opportunity to study criminology and social policy in a multidisciplinary context where the value of interdisciplinary analysis is explored.
  • To enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of the theoretical and empirical bases of criminology and social policy.
  • To enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of particular aspects of criminology and social policy.
  • To provide students with a knowledge and understanding of the historical origins and development of British social policy and social issues and associated welfare agencies.
  • To provide students with an understanding of how public concerns become issues of social and criminal justice policy and practiceand appear on the social agenda, and how policies are formulated and implemented.
  • To familiarise students with British organisational and institutional arrangements for addressing issues of social and criminal justice policy and practice.
  • To develop students’ ability to theorise about issues in criminology and social policy.
  • To provide students with a knowledge and understanding of contemporary issues relating to criminal justice and agencies of criminal justice in England and Wales.
  • To familiarise students with contemporary issues in policing and crime control.
  • To develop the ability of students to conduct independent enquiry in the fields of criminology and social policy, using appropriate methodologies.
  • To provide a high quality honours programme in criminology and social policy, which enhances students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Social Policy and Administration
  • The Benchmark Statement for Criminology
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Criminology and Social Policy

 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas:

  • A broad overview of contemporary British social policy.
  • A broad overview of contemporary British criminology.
  • A detailed knowledge of a number of key issues in social policy.
  • A detailed knowledge of a number of key issues in criminology.
  • An understanding of the nature of crime and how the relevant agencies and agents respond to it.
  • An understanding of the policy process, and the agencies and agents through which social policies are developed and delivered.
  • An understanding of the main theoretical approaches within criminology and their relevance in any analysis of specific criminological issues.
  • An understanding of the main theoretical approaches and ideologies associated with welfare provision and of their relevance in any analysis of specific areas of social policy or particular social issues.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Understand criminological and social policy questions and investigate them.
  • Have an appreciation of the complexity of criminological and social problems and be able to assess the merits of competing theories and explanations.
  • Interpret the values and practices of agencies that respond to criminological and social policy issues.
  • Apply relevant theory and research methods to problems and questions in criminology and social policy.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Understand the nature of questions in social policy and criminology and investigate them.
  • Use appropriate analytical methods and research tools in relation to criminological and social problems; including quantitative, qualitative and evaluative techniques.
  • Analyse and assess social policy and criminological findings methodologically and communicate information about them.
  • Examine the relevance of social policy and criminological research at a national and international level.
  • Communicate ideas for different audiences orally and to write essays, reports and a major dissertation.
  • Act professionally and in accordance with ethical propriety.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  • Marshal evidence in support of arguments and analysis.
  • Produce reasoned and structured arguments both orally and in writing.
  • Use information technology: use instructional material and research tools on computers, and search for relevant material on the internet.
  • Collect data in numerical form, present it in tables and graphs, and analyse it with a range of statistical tools.
  • Clarify questions, consider alternative solutions and evaluate outcomes.
  • Share responsibility for a task with others; agree common goals and methods to achieve them; co-ordinate the use of common resources.
  • Write and speak clearly to topic; to draft and edit presentations and contribute actively to group discussion.
  • Manage self-learning: seek out sources of information, plan time to make the best use of resources and review priorities in the light of deadlines.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code:  SSUB03

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme. In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits. In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B.

Important note: No modules may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may also be subject to change. 

Part A - Introductory Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (90 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A

10

SSA305

Foundation in Social Sciences

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B

10

SSA206

Crime and Social Welfare: Policy in Practice

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA009

Introduction to Research Methods

30

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take THREE 10 credit options from the following:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

10

SSA156

Self and Identity

10

  

 

 

 

 

 

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA614

Political Ideologies

10

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

10

SSA158

Ideas and Controversies in Psychology

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Semesters 1 and 2

Students can also choose other modules from the University’s Module Catalogue, approved by the Department of Social Sciences for inclusion in the programme, including languages in French, German, Spanish and Mandarin.

Part B - Degree Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (70 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB201

Criminological Theory

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB203

Operational Policing Issues

20

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB009

Advanced Research Methods

30

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take 50 credits worth of options across two semesters. A selection will be offered from the following list, plus language modules:

Semester 1

 Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB034

Surveillance Society

10

SSB128

Political Psychology

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

10

EUB630

British Politics

10

 Semester 2

 Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB023

Religion and Society

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

10

SSB239

Drugs: Society, Politics and Policy

10

SSB175

Psychological Disorders in Society

10

EUB604

Comparative European Politics

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part A.

10

Part I:  Placement Year

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B. Two placement routes are available:

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.
  • Registration on the DIntS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Weight

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Students opting for the Study Abroad scheme in Part B will only be allowed to undertake placement year (DIntS or DPS) in exceptional circumstances, and at the discretion of the Department.

Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC220

Crime Prevention

10

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC211

The Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC299

Criminology and Social Policy Project Dissertation

 40

 

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take 40 credits worth of options across two semesters. A selection will be offered from the list below, plus language modules:

Semester 1

Code

Title

Credit

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

SSC031

History of Ideas: Stereotyping the ‘Other’

20

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

SSC357

Producing the News

20

EUC602

Nationalism: blood, soil and citizens

20

EUC604

State, Violence and Terrorism

20

 Semester 2

Code

Title

Credit

SSC022

Body, Health and the Digital

20

SSC239

Green Criminology

20

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

SSC316

Media, Memory and History

20

EUC677

Britain and the EU

20

EUC658

Art, Politics and Society

20

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part B.

10

 

 

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

SS BSc (Hons) Social Psychology (pre-2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

British Psychological Society, for Graduate Membership of the Society (GM) and Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership as a Chartered Psychologist (GBC)

Final award BSc/ BSc+DIntS/ BSc+DIS/ BSc+DPS
Programme title Social Psychology
Programme code SSUB02
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time, BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS/DIS: 4 years full-time (including a one-year placement)
UCAS code C880
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/socialsciences/socialpsychology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide students with the opportunity to study psychology from a social perspective in the multidisciplinary context of a Social Sciences Department in a way that fosters critical evaluation of psychological theory and research, the relations between psychology and its cognate disciplines, both academically and in its real-life application.
  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students develop systematic and scientific understandings of key and cutting-edge aspects of psychology in a social psychological context, including acquisition of coherent and detailed knowledge of mind, brain, behaviour, and experience, and of the complex interactions between these.
  • To enable students to devise and sustain arguments and solve problems throughout their development of a conceptually and empirically grounded understanding of social psychology and core psychological topics, and be able to communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to different types of audiences.
  • To develop students’ ability to critically evaluate arguments, assumptions and abstract concepts, understand of the role of empirical evidence in the creation and testing of theory and appreciate the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of knowledge.
  • To enable students to deploy accurately established techniques of  quantitative and qualitative research techniques and methods for investigating experience and behaviour culminating in an ability to conduct research independently.
  • To enable students to manage their own learning, exercise initiative and responsibility, use scholarly materials and primary sources, which maximises students’ opportunities to graduate with the abilities needed to undertake further training and enhance their employability.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The QAA Subject Benchmark Statement for Psychology.
  • Requirements of the British Psychological Society which undertakes regular two-yearly ongoing monitoring and a full Review once every five years, including their curriculum.
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Social Psychology 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

The Social Psychology degree teaches the broad range of psychology, but necessarily emphasises the social psychological base of the discipline.  In keeping with the British Psychological Society requirements for accreditation, students develop knowledge and understanding of psychological topics in the areas listed below, assessed separately at Level I or H as defined by the QAA Framework for HE Qualifications. On successful completion of this programme, students will therefore be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  1. Social psychology: e.g., social cognition, attribution, attitudes, group processes and intergroup relations, close relationships and social constructionism.
  2. Cognitive psychology: e.g., perception, learning, memory, thinking, language, consciousness and cognitive neuropsychology.
  3. Individual differences and personality: e.g., abnormal and normal personality, psychological testing, intelligence, cognitive style, emotion, motivation and mood.
  4. Developmental psychology: e.g., childhood, adolescence and life-span development, development of attachment, social relations, cognitive and language development, social and cultural contexts of development.
  5. Biological psychology: e.g., biological bases of behaviour, hormones and behaviour, behavioural genetics, neuropsychology, sociobiology and evolutionary psychology.
  6. Conceptual and historical issues in psychology: e.g., the scientific underpinnings of psychology as a discipline, its historical origins, development and limitations.
  7. Research design, including qualitative and quantitative methods, the nature and appropriate statistical analysis of data, psychometrics and measurement techniques, an empirical project.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students are able to:

  • Apply multiple perspectives to psychological issues, recognising that psychology involves a range of research methods, theories, evidence and applications.
  • Reason scientifically and integrate ideas and findings across psychology and recognise distinctive psychological approaches to relevant issues.
  • Critically analyse methods and theory in psychology and demonstrate the relationship between theory and evidence.
  • Apply psychological theory and research methods of psychology to problems in everyday life and social institutions.
  • Identify and evaluate general patterns in behaviour, psychological functioning and experience.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

  • Generate and explore hypotheses and research questions.
  • Carry out empirical studies involving a variety of methods of data collection, including experiments, observation, psychometric tests, questionnaires, interviews and field studies.
  • Analyse data using both quantitative and qualitative methods.
  • Present and evaluate research findings.
  • Employ evidence-based reasoning and examine practical, theoretical and ethical issues associated with the use of different methodologies, paradigms and methods of analysis in psychology.
  • Use a variety of psychological tools, including specialist software, laboratory equipment and psychometric instruments.
  • Carry out an extensive piece of independent empirical research, including defining a research problem; formulating testable hypotheses/research questions; choosing appropriate methodologies; planning and carrying out a study efficiently; demonstrating awareness of ethical issues and current codes of ethics and conduct; obtaining the appropriate ethical approval for their research; demonstrating ability to reason about the data and present the findings effectively; discussing findings in terms of previous research; evaluating methodologies and analyses employed and implications for ethics; and, where appropriate.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Communicate effectively through written, oral and visual means, and be able to develop a cogent argument supported by relevant evidence, sensitive to the needs and expectations of an audience.
  2. Comprehend and use numerical, statistical and other forms of data effectively.
  3. Be computer literate, retrieve and organise information effectively, and handle primary source material critically.
  4. Problem solve and reason scientifically, identify and pose research questions, to consider alternative approaches to their solutions and to evaluate outcomes.
  5. Make critical judgements and evaluation, be able to take different perspectives on issues and problems, to evaluate them in a critical manner to arrive at supported conclusions.
  6. Be sensitive to contextual and interpersonal factors that shape behaviour and social interaction including understanding interpersonal conflict and the importance of enhancing cooperation to maximise the effectiveness of individual skills as shown in group work and team building.
  7. Be independent and pragmatic as learners, taking responsibility for their own learning and skill development.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code: SSUB02

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits.  In each part, credit splits across the two semesters may be 60:60, 50:70 or 70:50 (depending on the credit weights available).  In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B or a Study Abroad scheme at Part B.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

ONLY APPLICABLE TO STUDENTS ENTERING PRIOR TO 2016

 

Part A - Introductory Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA101

Introduction to Social Psychology - Cognition and Social Influence

10

SSA105

Psychological Statistics 1A

10

SSA107

Practical Social Psychology 1A

10

SSA110

Social Psychology and Relationships

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA102

Introduction to Social Psychology - Self in Social Context

10

SSA106

Psychological Statistics 1B

10

SSA108

Practical Social Psychology 1B

10

SSA109

Controversies in Psychology

10

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take FOUR 10 credit options from the following (students must choose at least one Social Sciences option per Semester):

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA614

Political Ideologies

10

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B

10

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies: Broadcasting

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Students can also choose other modules from the University’s Module Catalogue, approved by the Department of Social Sciences for inclusion in the programme, including languages in French, German, Spanish and Mandarin.

Language Options:  Students who wish to take a language are required to do both Semester 1 and Semester 2 modules

20

Part B - Degree Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (120 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

PSB319

Individual Differences and Personality

10

SSB105

Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology

10

SSB132

Developmental Psychology

20

SSB134

Biological Psychology

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB103

Researching Social Life

20

SSB104

Understanding Human Interaction

10

SSB106

Quantitative Research Methods

10

SSB133

Cognitive Psychology

20

NO OPTIONAL MODULES

Part I

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B. Three placement routes are available:

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in the UK or abroad in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of industrial training leading to the award of the Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS) in the UK or abroad in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.

Registration on the DIntS, DIS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

 

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

SSI003

Diploma in Industrial Studies Placement (DIS)

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (60 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC136

Social Psychology and Social Problems

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC137

Psychology in Practice

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC199 

Social Psychology Project Dissertation

 40

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take THREE 20 credit options from the following: Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

SSC031

History of Ideas: Stereotyping the ‘Other’

20

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

SSC357

Producing the News

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC022

Body, Health and the Digital

20

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

SSC239

Green Criminology

20

SSC316

Media, Memory and History

20

PSC315

Psychology and Health 

20

PSC311

Clinical Psychology 

 20

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options can be taken in either semester (French, Spanish, Mandarin or German)

10

 

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

Subject to the provisions of Regulation XX, candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme may opt to undergo reassessment in the University’s Special Assessment Period, subject to SAP restrictions on SSA107, SSA108, SSB103, SSB104, SSB105 and SSB106.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

SS BSc (Hons) Sociology

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

N/A

Final award BSc / BSc+DIntS / BSc+DPS
Programme title Sociology
Programme code SSUB01
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time, BSc (Hons) DPS/DInts: 4 years full-time (including a one-year placement)
UCAS code L300, L301
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/socialsciences/sociology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To provide an intellectually stimulating environment in which students can develop the critical and practical skills of the sociologist.
  • To provide students with the opportunity to study sociology in a multidisciplinary context where the value of interdisciplinary analysis is explored.
  • To enable students to gain a broad knowledge and understanding of sociology, especially concerning the relations between personal troubles of milieu and public issues of social structure.
  • To enable students to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of issues in sociology through specialist study and research.
  • To enable students to learn about the key concepts, theories and methods of sociology.
  • To enable students to interpret and analyse social processes and structures.
  • To enable students to compare different social arrangements.
  • To enable students to address key issues in sociological analysis and in society, including social inequality and cultural diversity.
  • To enable students to appreciate alternative perspectives in social science.
  • To enable students to appreciate the value of sociological approaches in non-academic contexts.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

 

 

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Sociology
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Sociology

 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the following areas: 

  1. Understand basic sociological concepts, such as identity, inequality, social structure and social change.
  2. Describe and examine classical and contemporary social theories.
  3. Evaluate contemporary social issues from a sociological perspective.
  4. Apply a variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  5. Analyse social diversity and inequality.
  6. Analyse the relationship between individuals, groups and society.
  7. Discuss the role of culture, media and representation in social life.
  8. Explain social change, including from an historical and global perspective.

 

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Assess the merits of varied social theories and explanations.
  2. Formulate sociological research questions and select appropriate research methods to answer them.
  3. Evaluate and interpret research evidence on social life.
  4. Synthesize and critically reflect on sociological theories and empirical studies.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Communicate sociological knowledge in oral presentations.
  2. Communicate sociological knowledge in advanced formats, e.g. posters, video, oral debates.
  3. Interpret and analyse sociologically relevant statistical data.
  4. Design and execute practical sociological research.
  5. Apply ethical principles in sociological research.
  6. Use sociological knowledge to find solutions to public and social policy and private enterprise.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Master basic study skills e.g. referencing, use of databases.
  2. Locate and evaluate sources of information, synthesize information and deploy it in reasoned argument.
  3. Communicate and present information e.g. construct written arguments, contribute to group discussions
  4. Communicate and present information using more advanced formats e.g. prepare posters, write reports, oral presentations using powerpoint, preparation of videos.
  5. Design and execute research projects.
  6. Work in teams.
  7. Use statistical and other quantitative skills, including use of statistical software.
  8. Manage time and work: plan time and resources independently in the light of deadlines.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code: SSUB01

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme.  In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits.   In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B or a Study Abroad scheme at Part B.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

Part A - Introductory Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (70 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

SSA003

Sociological Imagination

10

SSA305

Foundation in Social Sciences

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA009

Introduction to Research Methods

30

OPTIONAL MODULES

Student must choose FIVE 10 credit options from the following:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

GYA004

Geographies of Global Economic Change

10

SSA156

Self and Identity

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies: Contemporary Trends and Issues

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

GYA104

Geographies of Identity

10

EUA614

Political Ideologies

10

SSA158

Ideas and Controversies

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B

10

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies: Historical Themes and Perspectives

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Students can also choose other modules from the University’s Module Catalogue, approved by the Department of Social Sciences for inclusion in the programme, including languages in French, German, Spanish and Mandarin.

Part B - Degree Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB008

Classical Social Theories

10

SSB026

Globalisation and its 'Others'

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB010

Contemporary Social Theories

20

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB009

Advanced Research Methods

30

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take 40 credits worth of options across two semesters. A selection will be offered from the following list, plus language modules:

Semester 1

 Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB034

Surveillance Society

10

SSB128

Political Psychology

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

10

EUB630

British Politics

10

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB023

Religion and Society

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

10

SSB239

Drugs: Society, Politics and Policy

10

SSB175

Psychological Disorders in Society

10

EUB604

Comparative European Politics

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part A.

10

Information for students wishing to take a Study Abroad or Placement Year

Study Abroad: Candidates have the opportunity to apply for permission to undertake an approved course of study at either a European university which is a member of the EU approved Erasmus Exchange programmes in the Department of Social Sciences or any other University with which the University has exchange study arrangements. Such a course of study must be undertaken in place of one Semester at Part B.

For students opting to take the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 2

Semester 1 Compulsory Modules total modular weight 50 credits:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB008

Classical Social Theories

10

SSB026

Globalisation and its ‘Others’

20

SSB393

Advanced Research Methods A (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB097

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB098

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB099

Study Abroad Module

70

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 1.  A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the Part B list provided above.

For students opting to take the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 1

Semester 2 Compulsory modules total modular weight 40 credits:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB010

Contemporary Social Theories

20

SSB394

Advanced Research Methods B (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB097

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB098

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB099

Study Abroad Module

70

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 2. A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the Part B list provided above.

Part I:  Placement Year

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B. Two placement routes are available:

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.
  • Registration on the DIntS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Students opting for the Study Abroad scheme in Part B will only be allowed to undertake placement year (DIntS or DPS) in exceptional circumstances, and at the discretion of the Department.


Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits) 

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC032

The Individual and Society

10

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

Semester 2 

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC033

Communicating Sociology

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Weight

SSC099

Sociology Project Dissertation

 40

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take 40 credits worth of options across two semesters. A selection will be offered from the list below, plus language modules:

 

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

SSC031

History of Ideas: Stereotyping the ‘Other’

20

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

SSC357

Producing the News

20

EUC602

Nationalism: blood, soil and citizens

20

EUC604

State, Violence and Terrorism

20

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC022

Body, Health and the Digital

20

SSC239

Green Criminology

20

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

SSC316

Media, Memory and History

20

EUC677

Britain and the EU

20

EUC658

Art, Politics and Society

20

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part B.

10

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX. 

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

SS BSc (Hons) Media, Culture and Society

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

N/A

Final award BSc/BSc+DPS/BSc+DIntS
Programme title Media, Culture and Society
Programme code SSUB05
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS: 4 years full-time (including a one-year placement)
UCAS code LP33, LP34
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/
departments/socialsciences/mediacultureandsociety/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To develop knowledge and understanding of key issues concerning the media, culture and society through specialist inter-disciplinary study and research.
  • To master key concepts, theories, methods and specialist skills required to interpret and analyse media, cultural and social processes and structures.
  • To address issues of social inequality, cultural diversity and social change and the contribution of the media to both.
  • To engage critically with rival arguments about media, culture and society.
  • To enhance students’ career and employment opportunities on graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Communication, Media, Film and Cultural Studies (2008)
  • The Benchmark Statement for Sociology (2007)
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Sociology and BSc Communication and Media Studies  

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Differentiate between the major traditions of thought and analysis which have contributed to the study of media, culture and society.
  2. Critically appraise contemporary debates on media, culture and society, identifying key arguments and developing their own distinct perspective.
  3. Compare and contrast the major quantitative and qualitative styles of research and investigation relevant to the study of media, culture and society, as well as their strengths and weaknesses.
  4. Identify the main aspects of the historical development of key media and cultural practices and institutions, including the press, broadcasting, advertising and PR and digital media.
  5. Assess the inter-relations between media and cultural structures and practices and their economic and political dynamics at both national and transnational levels.
  6. Discuss the ethical and policy issues posed by the practices of media and cultural institutions, considering relevant forms of regulation, including self-regulation.
  7. Examine the ways in which media and cultural forms construct shared meanings, taking into account the roles of media producers, regulators and owners, media texts and genres, as well as media audiences and users.
  8. Evaluate the role of media and culture in the organisation of everyday life, social identities and belief systems, paying attention to their involvement in establishing forms of inclusion as well as exclusion.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Draw on concepts and theories from  sociology, psychology, communication and media studies and other relevant disciplines and combine them productively to interpret media, culture and society.
  2. Critically appraise contemporary developments in media, culture and society and contribute effectively to the debates surrounding them.
  3. Formulate research questions appropriate to the problem studied and employ appropriate methods and resources in addressing them, providing justification as appropriate.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Use a range of qualitative and quantitative methods of data gathering and data analysis relevant to the study of media, culture and society.
  2. Retrieve information from specialist electronic and other sources relevant to the study of media, culture and society, and evaluate the materials collected critically taking into account the nature of the source.
  3. Explain the relevance of media, cultural and sociological understanding and analysis to public and social policy and private enterprise to specialist and non-specialist audiences.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

  1. Gather, organise and deploy ideas and information in order to formulate arguments cogently and persuasively and express them effectively in oral and/or written forms, including under-pressure, appropriate for the chosen audience;
  2. Organise and manage self-directed projects (with appropriate guidance).
  3. Work individually, flexibly and independently showing self-discipline, self-direction and reflexivity.
  4. Work productively in a group or team, displaying at different times abilities to listen, contribute and lead effectively, and work towards the attainment of a common goal.
  5. Master relevant applications of Information Technology, including data analysis and data visualisation packages.
  6. Follow briefs to deliver work to the required length, format and deadline, utilising appropriate time-management and workload-management skills.
  7. Consider and evaluate their own work in a reflective manner, identifying key strengths and weaknesses and developing strategies for self-improvement.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code SSUB05

This is a three-year long full-time degree programme. In each of the three parts (years) of the degree (A, B and C), students take modules amounting to 120 credits. In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B or a Study Abroad scheme at Part B.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

Part A – Introductory Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (90 credits):

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA003

Sociological Imagination

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies A

10

SSA307

Constructing Meaning: Texts and Audiences

10

SSA305

Foundation in Social Sciences

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies B

10

SSA306

Media Landscapes

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA009

Introduction to Research Methods

30

CORE MODULES

Students MUST choose at least ONE 10 credit module from the selection below:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

OPTIONAL MODULES

In addition, student MAY choose up to TWO 10 credit options across both semesters, from a choice of: 

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

SSA156

Self and Identity

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology & Social Policy A

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA614

Political Ideologies

10

SSA158

Idea and Controversies

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology & Social Policy B

10

SSA308

Introduction to Critical Viewings

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Students can also choose other modules from the University’s Module Catalogue, approved by the Department of Social Sciences for inclusion in the programme, including languages in French, German, Spanish and Mandarin.

Part B – Degree Modules

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB301

Media, Identity and Inequality

20

SSB008

Classical Social Theories

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB303

Media and Social Change

20

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB009

Advanced Research Methods

30

CORE MODULES

Students MUST choose at least ONE 10 credit module from the selection below:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA034

Surveillance Society

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA023

Religion and Society

10

OPTIONAL MODULES

In addition, student MAY choose up to TWO 10 credit options across both semesters, from a choice of: 

Semester 1

 Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB128

Political Psychology

10

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

10

EUB630

British Politics

10

SSB317

Critical Viewings:  Film

10

 Semester 2

 Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

10

SSB239

Drugs: Society, Politics and Policy

10

SSB175

Psychological Disorders in Society

10

EUB604

Comparative European Politics

10

SSB366

Promotional Culture

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part A.

10

Information for students wishing to take a Study Abroad or Placement Year

Study Abroad: Candidates have the opportunity to apply for permission to undertake an approved course of study at either a European university which is a member of the EU approved Erasmus Exchange programmes in the Department of Social Sciences or any other University with which the University has exchange study arrangements. Such a course of study must be undertaken in place of one Semester at Part B.

For students opting to take the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 2

Semester 1 Compulsory Modules total modular weight 50 credits:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB008

Classical Social Theories

10

SSB301

Media, Identity and Inequality

20

SSB393

Advanced Research Methods A (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

SSB397

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB398

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB399

Study Abroad Module

70

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 1.  A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the Part B list provided above.

For students opting to take the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 1

Semester 2 Compulsory modules total modular weight 40 credits:

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB303

Media and Social Change

20

SSB394

Advanced Research Methods B (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

SSB397

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB398

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB399

Study Abroad Module

70

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 2. A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the Part B list provided above.

Part I:  Placement Year

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B.  Two placement routes are available:

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.
  • Registration on the DIntS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Students opting for the Study Abroad scheme in Part B will only be allowed to undertake placement year (DIntS or DPS) in exceptional circumstances, and at the discretion of the Department.

Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits) 

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC032

The Individual and Society

10

SSC320

Presenting Media Debates

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC033

Communicating Sociology

10

SSC319

Digital Media and Society

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC399

Communication and Media Studies Project Dissertation

40

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take 40 credits worth of options across two semesters. A selection will be offered from the list below, plus language modules:

 

Semester 1

Code

Title

Credit

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

SSC031

History of Ideas: Stereotyping the ‘Other’

20

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

SSC317

Critical Viewings: Documentary

10

SSC357

Producing the News

20

EUC602

Nationalism: blood, soil and citizens

20

EUC604

State, Violence and Terrorism

20

 Semester 2

Code

Title

Credit

SSC022

Body, Health and the Digital

20

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

SSC239

Green Criminology

20

SSC316

Media, Memory and History

20

SSC318

Critical Viewings: TV

10

EUC658

Art, Politics and Society

20

EUC677

Britain and the EU

20

Semesters 1 and 2

Language Options:  Students may choose to take a language option in either semester, however this must carry on from a language in Part B.

10

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

SS BSc (Hons) Social Psychology with Criminology (pre-2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

N/A

Final award BSc/ BSc + DPS/ BSc + DIntS/ BSc + DIS
Programme title Social Psychology with Criminology
Programme code SSUB06
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS/DIS: 4 years full-time (including 1 one-year placement)
UCAS code C8M9,C8M0
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/
departments/socialsciences/socialpsychologywithcriminology/

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To foster critical evaluation of both criminological and psychological theory and research, in scholarly and real-life applications.
  • To develop systematic and scientific understandings of key and cutting-edge social psychological aspects of mind, behaviour, and experience, as well as criminal justice, policing and control.
  • To develop skills of problem-solving through a conceptual and empirically grounded understanding of core criminology and social psychology topics.
  • To explain the role of empirical evidence in the creation and testing of theory.
  • To use techniques of quantitative and qualitative research and methods for investigating experience and behaviour.
  • To support the acquisition of critical thinking and transferable skills through independent research, in pursuit of further training and enhanced employability.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Psychology
  • The Benchmark Statement for Criminology
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Social Psychology and BSc Criminology and Social Policy  

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of

K1. Core topics, theories and debates that offer the ground for conceptualizing the close relationship between  social psychology and criminology and social policy.

K2. Contemporary and historic debates related to the role of biological and social/contextual bases of behaviour in social psychological and criminological theory.

K3. Core issues and controversies related to the role of cognitive and individual differences perspectives in the explanation of social behaviour.

K4. Social, cognitive and linguistic developmental dimensions that influence the behaviour of individuals in a variety of social and policy contexts.

K5. Conceptual and historical issues that underpin the active relationship between social psychological theory and social policy problems.

K6. Key dimensions of designing and conducting empirical projects that demonstrate the relationship between social psychology and criminological theory and data.

K7. The advantages and disadvantages of qualitative and quantitative methods, research design, statistical techniques, and uses of information technology with relevance to both disciplines.

K8. Novel epistemological and theoretical insights through engaging in practical action and independent research.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

C1. Critically appraise social psychological and  criminological and social policy questions in the context of primary and secondary data provided by research studies and government agencies.

C2. Analyse the complexity and merits of competing theories and explanations pertaining to the inter-relation between criminological and social psychological problems.

C3. Apply theory and research methods derived from social psychology and criminology to problems and behaviour in the daily world and institutions.

C4. Formulate critical accounts of human experience from a variety of social sources, and establish pertinent connections between them.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

P1. Observe, record accurately and formulate a systematic account of the variability and variety of human behaviour in natural and institutional settings.

P2. Use appropriate analytical methods and research tools in relation to social psychological and criminological research topics ; including quantitative, qualitative and evaluative techniques.

P3. Interpret qualitative and quantitative data rigorously in the context of clearly defined research hypotheses derived from, and relevant to, social and policy issues and problems.

P4. Communicate ideas in different genres and for different audiences, in writing and orally, through producing presentations, long and short essays, practical reports and a major dissertation.

P5. Act professionally and in accordance with ethical propriety.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

T1. Gather, organise and deploy evidence in support of persuasive arguments and analysis.

T2. Produce reasoned and structured arguments orally and in writing for appropriate audiences.

T3. Use information technology appropriately including sourcing data, data analysis and data visualisation packages.

T4. Share responsibility for a task with others; work productively in a group or team, displaying at different times abilities to listen, facilitate, contribute and lead effectively.

T5. Write and speak clearly to topic; to draft and edit presentations and contribute actively to group discussion.

T6. Manage self-learning and evaluate own work in a reflective manner, identifying key strengths and weaknesses and developing strategies for self-improvement.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code SSUB06

The programme lasts three years full-time. Students who opt to take a placement year between the second and final years complete a 4 year programme. Students take modules amounting to 120 credits each year. The degree is a combined honours programme, majoring in Social Psychology with a minor in Criminology. Students take a minimum of 60 credits worth of Social Psychology modules and 40 credits worth of Criminology modules each year.

In Year 1 (Part A) students take 60 credits of compulsory core modules in Social Psychology and may choose 20 credits of options from Sociology or Communication and Media Studies. In addition students take 40 credits of compulsory, core modules in Criminology.

In Year 2 (Part B) students take 80 credits of compulsory, core modules in Social Psychology and 40 credits of compulsory, core modules in Criminology. In the final year (Part C) students take 60 credits of compulsory core modules in Social Psychology, which includes a dissertation; one 20 credit Social Psychology optional module; plus 20 credits of compulsory core modules in Criminology and one 20 credit Criminology optional module.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

  

ONLY APPLICABLE TO STUDENTS ENTERING PRIOR TO 2016

 

Part A

COMPULSORY MODULES (100 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA101

Introduction to Social Psychology: Cognition and Social Influence

10

SSA105

Psychological Statistics 1A

10

SSA107

Practical Social Psychology 1A

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy  A

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA102

Introduction to Social Psychology: Self in social context

10

SSA106

Psychological Statistics 1B

10

SSA108

Practical Social Psychology 1B

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy  B

10

SSA206

Crime and Social Welfare

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA305

Foundations of Social Science

10

OPTIONAL MODULES (20 credits)

Students take two 10 credit options from the following:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA614

Political Ideologies

10

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

10

Semester 1 and 2

                         

Language option: Students who wish to take a language are required to do both Semester 1 and Semester 2 modules

20               

Part B

COMPULSORY MODULES (120 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

PSB319

Individual Differences and Personality

10

SSB105

Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology

10

SSB132

Developmental Psychology

20

SSB201

Criminological Theory

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB103

Researching Social Life

20

SSB104

Understanding Human Interaction

10

SSB106

Quantitative Research Methods

10

SSB203

Operational Policing Issues

20

NO OPTIONAL MODULES

Part I

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B. Three placement routes are available:

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in the UK or abroad in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.
  • Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS) Route:  Students taking this route undertake a programme of industrial training to the award of the Diploma of Industrial Studies (DIS) in the UK or abroad in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Registration on the DIntS, DIS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

 

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

SSI003

Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS)

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC136

Social Psychology and Social Problems

10

SSC220

Crime Prevention

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC137

Psychology in Practice

10

SSC211

The Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC199 

Social Psychology Project Dissertation

 40

CORE MODULES

Students MUST also choose ONE 20 credit criminology module from the selection below:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

SSC239

Green Criminology

20

OPTIONAL MODULES

In addition, students MUST also choose ONE 20 credit modules from the options list below:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

PSC315

Psychology and Health

20

PSC311

Clinical Psychology

20

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Programme Specification

SS BSc (Hons) Sociology with Criminology

Academic Year: 2017/18

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Reg. XX (Undergraduate Awards) (see University Regulations)
  • Module Specifications
  • The teaching, learning and assessment strategies used at Loughborough (available soon)
  • What makes Loughborough University programmes and its graduates distinctive (available soon)
  • Summary
  • Programme aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Programme structure
  • Progression and weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

N/A

Final award BSc (Hons) / BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS *Diploma in Professional Studies/Diploma in International Studies
Programme title Sociology with Criminology
Programme code SSUB07
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS: 4 years full-time (including 1 one-year placement)
UCAS code L3M9, L3M0
Admissions criteria

ABB-BBB

Date at which the programme specification was published

1. Programme Aims

  • To deploy sociological theories, concepts and practices in the focused analysis of  criminology.
  • To develop knowledge and understanding of society as well as crime, specifically the relationship between private trauma and public policy and organisation.
  • To examine key concepts, theories and methods of sociology and criminology.
  • To interpret and analyse contemporary social issues in general, and contemporary issues relating to criminal justice, policing and crime control in particular.
  • To address key issues in sociological analysis and in society, including social inequality and cultural diversity.
  • To examine British organisational and institutional arrangements for addressing issues of criminal justice policy.
  • To hone skills that will enhance career and employment opportunities in varied occupations in the public and private sector upon graduating.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Sociology
  • The Benchmark Statement for Criminology
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Sociology and BSc Criminology and Social Policy 

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

  1. Examine classical and contemporary social and/or criminological theories.
  2. Evaluate contemporary social and political issues and debates using insights from  sociology and/or criminology.
  3. Explain changing social structures and processes, tracing relevant historical and global perspectives.
  4. Apply a variety of classical and innovative qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  5. Explain basic sociological concepts, such as identity, inequality, social structure and social change.
  6. Use sociological and criminological concepts to critically discuss diversity and causes of inequality.
  7. Analyse the relationships between individuals, groups and society.
  8. Discuss the prominent role of culture, (new) media and representation in social life.
  9. Explain the specificity of the discipline of criminology and its interdisciplinary nature.
  10. Describe and analyse policy issues related to crime, crime prevention and social welfare in contemporary Britain.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  1. Assess the merits and shortcomings of complex social theories and explanations of crime.
  2. Formulate clear and penetrating sociological and criminological research questions and select appropriate research methods to address them.
  3. Evaluate and interpret research evidence on social life and/or crime.
  4. Synthesize and critically reflect on the relationship between sociological/criminological theories and empirical studies.
  5. Assess the merits of competing explanations and theories of crime.
  6. Interpret the values and practices of agencies that respond to criminological policy issues.
b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  1. Identify and retrieve sociologically and/or criminologically relevant information from library sources.
  2. Communicate sociological and criminological knowledge in oral presentations.
  3. Communicate sociological and criminological knowledge in advanced formats, e.g. posters, video, oral debates.
  4. Interpret and analyse sociologically and criminologically relevant statistical data.
  5. Design and execute sociological and criminological research.
  6. Apply ethical principles in sociological and/or criminological research.
  7. Use sociological and criminological knowledge to suggest solutions to public and social policy and private enterprise at national and international levels.
c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to: 

  1. Master a range of scholarly skills e.g. referencing, summarising, reporting and use of databases.
  2. Locate and evaluate sources of information, synthesize information and deploy it in reasoned argument.
  3. Communicate and present information in a professional manner e.g. construct written arguments, contribute to group discussions.
  4. Communicate and present information using more advanced formats e.g. prepare posters, write reports, oral presentations using powerpoint, preparation of videos.
  5. Design and execute research projects.
  6. Work in teams.
  7. Use statistical and other quantitative methods, including use of statistical software.
  8. Manage time and work: plan time and resources independently to meet deadlines and work under pressure.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code: SSUB07

The programme lasts three years full-time. Students take modules amounting to 120 credits each year. Since the degree is majoring in Sociology with a minor in Criminology, students are required to take a maximum of 80 credits worth of Sociology modules and 40 credits worth of Criminology modules each year.  In addition, students have the opportunity to undertake a Placement Year (Part I) after Part B or a Study Abroad scheme at Part B.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

 

Part A - Introductory Modules 

COMPULSORY MODULES (100 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

SSA003

Sociological Imagination

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy A

10

SSA305

Foundation in Social Sciences

10

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

 

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy B

10

 

SSA206

Crime and Social Welfare: Policy in Practice

10

 

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA009

Introduction in Research Methods

30

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students take TWO 10 credit options from the following:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA156

Self and Identity

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication & Media Studies

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

 10 

SSA158

Ideas and Controversies

10

 

Part B - Degree Modules 

COMPULSORY MODULES (100 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB008

Classical Social Theories

10

SSB201

Criminological Theory

 20

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB010

Contemporary Social Theories

20

SSB203

Operational Policing Issues

 20 

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB009

Advanced Research Methods

30

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students should choose TWO 10 credit modules from the selection below:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB216

Women and Crime: Victims, Offenders and Survivors

10

SSB360

The Media in Global Context

10

SSB034

Surveillance Society

10

SSB128

Political Psychology

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB023

Religion and Society

10

SSB234

Media, Culture and Crime

10

SSB239

Drugs: Society, Politics and Policy

10

SSB175

Psychological Disorders in Society

10

 

Information for students wishing to take a Study Abroad or Placement Year 

Study Abroad: Candidates have the opportunity to apply for permission to undertake an approved course of study at either a European university which is a member of the EU approved Erasmus Exchange programmes in the Department of Social Sciences or any other University with which the University has exchange study arrangements. Such a course of study must be undertaken in place of one Semester at Part B.

For students opting for the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 2

Compulsory modules:

Semester 1 Compulsory Modules total module weight 50 credits

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB008

Classical Social Theories

10

SSB201

Criminological Theory

 20

SSB393

Advanced Research Methods A (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

SSB097

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB098

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB099

Study Abroad Module

70

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 1. A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the list provided above in Part B.

For students opting for the Study Abroad scheme in Semester 1

Compulsory modules:

Semester 2 Compulsory Modules total module weight 60 credits

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB010

Contemporary Social Theories

20

SSB203

Operational Policing Issues

 20 

SSB394

Advanced Research Methods B (Erasmus)

20

In addition, depending on the credit gained through the Semester Abroad, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

SSB097

Study Abroad Module

50

SSB098

Study Abroad Module

60

SSB099

Study Abroad Module

70

Optional modules: Depending on the credit gained through the Study Abroad semester, students take either 10, 20 or 30 credits worth of options in Semester 2. A selection of optional modules will be offered every year from the list provided above in Part B.

Part I:  Placement Year

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B. Two placement routes are available: 

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in the UK or abroad in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.
  • Registration on the DIntS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Students opting for the Study Abroad scheme in Part B will only be allowed to undertake placement year (DInts or DPS) in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Department.

 

Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC032

The Individual and Society

10

SSC220

Crime Prevention

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC033

Communicating Sociology

10

SSC211

The Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

10

Semester 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC099

Sociology Dissertation

40


CORE MODULES

Students must also choose ONE 20 credit criminology module from the selection below:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

SSC239

Green Criminology

20

In addition, students must also choose ONE 20 credit modules from the options list below:

OPTIONAL MODULES

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

SSC031

History of Ideas: Stereotyping the ‘Other’

20

SSC130

Social Psychology of Everyday Life

20

SSC357

Producing the News

20

 Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSC022

Body, Health and the Digital

20

SSC316

Media, Memory and History

20

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.