Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Social Psychology with Criminology (pre-2016 entry)

Academic Year: 2016/17

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Summary
  • Aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Structure
  • Progression & weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different) N/A
Owning school/department Department of Social Sciences
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body

N/A

Final award BSc/ BSc + DPS/ BSc + DIntS/ BSc + DIS
Programme title Social Psychology with Criminology
Programme code SSUB06
Length of programme BSc (Hons): 3 years full-time BSc (Hons) DPS/DIntS/DIS: 4 years full-time (including 1 one-year placement)
UCAS code C8M9,C8M0
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/
departments/socialsciences/socialpsychologywithcriminology/

Date at which the programme specification was published Thu, 21 Apr 2016 16:37:57 BST

1. Programme Aims

  • To foster critical evaluation of both criminological and psychological theory and research, in scholarly and real-life applications.
  • To develop systematic and scientific understandings of key and cutting-edge social psychological aspects of mind, behaviour, and experience, as well as criminal justice, policing and control.
  • To develop skills of problem-solving through a conceptual and empirically grounded understanding of core criminology and social psychology topics.
  • To explain the role of empirical evidence in the creation and testing of theory.
  • To use techniques of quantitative and qualitative research and methods for investigating experience and behaviour.
  • To support the acquisition of critical thinking and transferable skills through independent research, in pursuit of further training and enhanced employability.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Psychology
  • The Benchmark Statement for Criminology
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications (2008)
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy
  • External Examiners’ Reports for BSc Social Psychology and BSc Criminology and Social Policy  

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of

K1. Core topics, theories and debates that offer the ground for conceptualizing the close relationship between  social psychology and criminology and social policy.

K2. Contemporary and historic debates related to the role of biological and social/contextual bases of behaviour in social psychological and criminological theory.

K3. Core issues and controversies related to the role of cognitive and individual differences perspectives in the explanation of social behaviour.

K4. Social, cognitive and linguistic developmental dimensions that influence the behaviour of individuals in a variety of social and policy contexts.

K5. Conceptual and historical issues that underpin the active relationship between social psychological theory and social policy problems.

K6. Key dimensions of designing and conducting empirical projects that demonstrate the relationship between social psychology and criminological theory and data.

K7. The advantages and disadvantages of qualitative and quantitative methods, research design, statistical techniques, and uses of information technology with relevance to both disciplines.

K8. Novel epistemological and theoretical insights through engaging in practical action and independent research.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

C1. Critically appraise social psychological and  criminological and social policy questions in the context of primary and secondary data provided by research studies and government agencies.

C2. Analyse the complexity and merits of competing theories and explanations pertaining to the inter-relation between criminological and social psychological problems.

C3. Apply theory and research methods derived from social psychology and criminology to problems and behaviour in the daily world and institutions.

C4. Formulate critical accounts of human experience from a variety of social sources, and establish pertinent connections between them.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

P1. Observe, record accurately and formulate a systematic account of the variability and variety of human behaviour in natural and institutional settings.

P2. Use appropriate analytical methods and research tools in relation to social psychological and criminological research topics ; including quantitative, qualitative and evaluative techniques.

P3. Interpret qualitative and quantitative data rigorously in the context of clearly defined research hypotheses derived from, and relevant to, social and policy issues and problems.

P4. Communicate ideas in different genres and for different audiences, in writing and orally, through producing presentations, long and short essays, practical reports and a major dissertation.

P5. Act professionally and in accordance with ethical propriety.

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to

T1. Gather, organise and deploy evidence in support of persuasive arguments and analysis.

T2. Produce reasoned and structured arguments orally and in writing for appropriate audiences.

T3. Use information technology appropriately including sourcing data, data analysis and data visualisation packages.

T4. Share responsibility for a task with others; work productively in a group or team, displaying at different times abilities to listen, facilitate, contribute and lead effectively.

T5. Write and speak clearly to topic; to draft and edit presentations and contribute actively to group discussion.

T6. Manage self-learning and evaluate own work in a reflective manner, identifying key strengths and weaknesses and developing strategies for self-improvement.

4. Programme structure

Programme Code SSUB06

The programme lasts three years full-time. Students who opt to take a placement year between the second and final years complete a 4 year programme. Students take modules amounting to 120 credits each year. The degree is a combined honours programme, majoring in Social Psychology with a minor in Criminology. Students take a minimum of 60 credits worth of Social Psychology modules and 40 credits worth of Criminology modules each year.

In Year 1 (Part A) students take 60 credits of compulsory core modules in Social Psychology and may choose 20 credits of options from Sociology or Communication and Media Studies. In addition students take 40 credits of compulsory, core modules in Criminology.

In Year 2 (Part B) students take 80 credits of compulsory, core modules in Social Psychology and 40 credits of compulsory, core modules in Criminology. In the final year (Part C) students take 60 credits of compulsory core modules in Social Psychology, which includes a dissertation; one 20 credit Social Psychology optional module; plus 20 credits of compulsory core modules in Criminology and one 20 credit Criminology optional module.

Important Note: No module may be taken and passed more than once. Optional module availability is subject to timetabling constraints and optional modules may be subject to change.

  

ONLY APPLICABLE TO STUDENTS ENTERING PRIOR TO 2016

 

Part A

COMPULSORY MODULES (100 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSA101

Introduction to Social Psychology: Cognition and Social Influence

10

SSA105

Psychological Statistics 1A

10

SSA107

Practical Social Psychology 1A

10

SSA201

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy  A

10

Semester 2

SSA102

Introduction to Social Psychology: Self in social context

10

SSA106

Psychological Statistics 1B

10

SSA108

Practical Social Psychology 1B

10

SSA202

Introduction to Criminology and Social Policy  B

10

SSA206

Crime and Social Welfare

10

Semester 1 and 2

SSA305

Foundations of Social Science

10

OPTIONAL MODULES (20 credits)

Students take two 10 credit options from the following:

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA607

Introduction to Democratic Government

10

SSA001

Introduction to Sociology: Identities and Inequalities

10

SSA301

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

10

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

EUA614

Political Ideologies

10

SSA002

Introduction to Sociology: Global, Social and Cultural Change

10

SSA302

Introduction to Communication and Media Studies

10

Semester 1 and 2

                         

Language option: Students who wish to take a language are required to do both Semester 1 and Semester 2 modules

20               

Part B

COMPULSORY MODULES (120 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Credit

PSB319

Individual Differences and Personality

10

SSB105

Historical and Conceptual Issues in Psychology

10

SSB132

Developmental Psychology

20

SSB201

Criminological Theory

20

Semester 2

Code

Module Title

Credit

SSB103

Researching Social Life

20

SSB104

Understanding Human Interaction

10

SSB106

Quantitative Research Methods

10

SSB203

Operational Policing Issues

20

NO OPTIONAL MODULES

Part I

Placement Year: Students have the opportunity to take a placement year (Part I) after successful completion of Part B. Three placement routes are available:

  • Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies (DPS) in the UK or abroad in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.
  • Diploma in International Studies (DIntS) Route: Students taking this route undertake a British Council approved Teaching Assistantship either at a school or other approved placement in a French, German or Spanish speaking country in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Successful completion of this route leads to the award of the Diploma in International Studies (DIntS). It should be noted that students undertaking a Teaching Assistantship should have a minimum of AS level in the appropriate language, or its equivalent. The equivalent level in the University Wide Language Programme is level 4. Note that students taking this Teaching Assistantship scheme through the Department of Politics, History and International Relations will be registered on module EUI002.  Students taking other work abroad placement opportunities will be registered on SSI002.
  • Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS) Route:  Students taking this route undertake a programme of industrial training to the award of the Diploma of Industrial Studies (DIS) in the UK or abroad in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Registration on the DIntS, DIS and DPS routes is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory performance during Parts A and B.

Depending on the Placement type, students are enrolled on one of the following modules:

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Weight

SSI001

Diploma in Professional Studies Placement (DPS)

120

SSI002

 

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for work placements abroad

120

SSI003

Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS)

120

EUI002

Diploma in International Studies Placement (DIntS) - for the Teaching Assistantship Scheme

120

Part C

COMPULSORY MODULES (80 credits)

Semester 1

Code

Module Title

Weight

SSC136

Social Psychology and Social Problems

10

SSC220

Crime Prevention

10

Semester 2

SSC137

Psychology in Practice

10

SSC211

The Criminal Justice System in England and Wales

10

Semesters 1 and 2

Code

Module Title

Weight

SSC199 

Social Psychology Project Dissertation

 

40

OPTIONAL MODULES

Students must also choose ONE 20 credit criminology module from the selection below:

Semester 1

SSC238

Youth Justice

20

 Semester 2

SSC233

Crime and Deviance in Sport

20

SSC237

Sex Work and Sex Industries

20

In addition, students must also choose ONE 20 credit modules from the options list below:

Semester 1

SSC024

Gender, Sex and Society

20

SSC030

Debating Society

20

SSC128

Political Psychology

20

SSC138

Forensic Psychology

20

SSC316

Media, Memory and History

20

Semester 2

SSC022

Body, Health and the Digital

20

SSC357

Producing the News

20

PSC315

Psychology and Health (capped at 20 students)

20

PSC311

Clinical Psychology (capped at 20 students)

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the Purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40% : Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Prospective students

Information on studying at Loughborough University, including course information, facilities, and student experience.

Find out more »