Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

BA(Hons) History

Academic Year: 2014/15

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Summary
  • Aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Structure
  • Progression & weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Politics, History and International Relations
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award BA(Hons)/BA(Hons)+ DPS/DIntS
Programme title History
Programme code EUUB09
Length of programme The duration of the Programme is 6 Semesters (three-year Programme) or 6 Semesters plus one academic year (four-year thick sandwich Programme). The three-year Programme allows, at Part B (Semester Two) for a course of study to be taught in English at a foreign University
UCAS code
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/courses/departments/phir/history/

 

Date at which the programme specification was published Tue, 09 Sep 2014 09:43:31 BST

1. Programme Aims

      

·         To equip students with knowledge, understanding and skills in Modern History.

·         To develop an understanding of the value of history both as an area of study and a tool for analysing the contemporary world by fostering critical, creative and independent thinking and a sensitive and disciplined approach to the subject

·         To stimulate students' enthusiasm for history through the deployment of cutting-edge teaching technologies and pedagogies designed to encourage student engagement.

·         To foster, enhance and advance students' personal development through a range of individual and team based learning activities.

·         To develop competence and practical skills which are transferable to a wide range of professions and careers as well as life experiences.

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • QAA Subject Benchmarking Statement – History   
  • Framework for Higher Education Qualifications  
  • Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services, Careers Education Benchmark Statement
  •  University Learning and Teaching Strategy

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

1.    the idea of academic disciplines as dynamic, plural and contested; developed within the broader framework of the social sciences and humanities;

2.    the potential applications of concepts within a broader critical framework;

3.    the main methodologies used in the analysis and interpretation of texts, other sources and data;

4.    past societies and historical processes over a chronological and geographical range, encompassing the modern history of Britain, Europe, and the World;

5.    the use of primary evidence in historical argument;

6.    History as an academic discipline, its schools of interpretations, and the variety of methodological approaches and theoretical foundations.

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

 

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

1.    demonstrate knowledge of cultural, political and social difference, through the analysis of the past;

2.    abstract and synthesise information in order to discuss changes in ways of thinking, cultural practices and behaviours over time;

3.    assess the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and arguments;

4.    critically evaluate and interpret a range of evidence, including texts, oral histories, visual materials other virtual sources and data;

5.    critically assess the construction of history as a political, cultural and social practice;

6.    appreciate the complexities and diversity of past events and mentalities;

7.    show a critical awareness of the problems inherent in historical sources and in interpreting the past.

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

 

1.    locate and retrieve information using a variety of research methods;

2.    select, combine, and interpret different types of source material;

3.    recognise and critically debate moral and ethical issues underpinning particular debates or enquiries;

4.    deploy bibliographic skills, including accuracy in the citation of sources and the use of proper conventions in the presentation of scholarly work

5.    present cogent and persuasive arguments in oral, written and practical form;

6.    undertake independent learning and research.

c. Key transferable skills:

1. undertake problem-solving and decision-making;

2. develop a reasoned argument;

3. solve problems with imagination and creativity;

4. communicate effectively in speech and writing;

5. work individually and in collaboration with others, demonstrating initiative and self-management;

6. use information and communication technologies for the retrieval and presentation of information.

 

4. Programme structure

Candidates following the four-year programme are required to undertake an academic year abroad (Part I) which occurs between Part B and Part C at  a French-, German- or Spanish-speaking university, following an approved course of study leading to the Diploma in International Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Candidates may also follow an approved course of study at a foreign university where teaching is in English leading to the Diploma in International Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI.

Candidates following the four-year thick sandwich programme are required to spend the third academic year (Part I) EITHER undertaking an approved Assistantship at a school or other approved placement in a French-, German- or Spanish-speaking country, leading to the Diploma in International Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI, OR undertaking an approved placement in the UK or abroad leading to the Diploma in Professional Studies in accordance with Senate Regulation XI. Participation in study abroad or a placement is subject to Departmental approval and satisfactory academic performance during Parts A and B. 

 

4.1       Content

Part A – Introductory Modules

Semester 1

(i) COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 50)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

EUA001

Introduction to Academic Studies

10

EUA701

Modern Europe: From the Enlightenment to the Present

20

EUA705

The Atlantic World: The Americas, Europe, and Africa since the 15th century

20

 

 

(ii) ELECTIVE MODULES (total modular weight 10)

 

Candidates choose one elective subject group, which must be followed throughout Part A from:

Communications and Media Studies: SSA301

Criminology and Social Policy: SSA201

Economics: ECA001

English: EAA101

French: 10 credit module from a list produced by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, depending on candidates’ previous qualifications

German: 10 credit module from a list produced by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, depending on candidates’ previous qualifications

Geography: GYA004

International Relations: EUA620

Business: BSA505

Mandarin Chinese: EUL401

Politics: EUA620

Social Psychology: SSA102

Sociology: SSA001

Spanish: 10 credit module from a list produced by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, depending on candidates’ previous qualifications

 

 Semester 2

 

 (i) COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 50)

 

Code

Title

Modular Weight

EUA703

Modern World History: New Perspectives

20

EUA704

What is History?

10

EUA706

History Fieldtrip

20

 

(ii) ELECTIVE MODULES (total modular weight 10)

Communication and Media Studies: SSA302

Criminology and Social Policy: SSA202

Economics: ECA001

English: EAA201

French: 10 credit module from a list produced by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, depending on candidates’ previous qualifications

Geography: GYA104

German: 10 credit module from a list produced by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, depending on candidates’ previous qualifications

International Relations: EUA617

Business: BSA506

Mandarin Chinese: EUL422

Politics: EUA607

Social Psychology: SSA101

Sociology: SSA002

Spanish: 10 credit module from a list produced by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations, depending on students’ previous qualifications and experience.

 

Part B – Degree Modules

EITHER – STANDARD ROUTE

Semester 1

 

(i) COMPULSORY MODULES

 None

 

(ii) OPTIONAL MODULES (total modular weight 50)

 

 

Module Code

Module Title

Module Weight

EUB702

Cold War Europe (20 credit)

 

20

EUB703

Cold War Europe (10 credit)

 

10

EUB704

Modern South Asia: Politics, Society & Culture (20 credit)

20

EUB705

Modern South Asia: Politics, Society & Culture (10 credit)

10

EUB706

Twentieth-Century Britain (20 credit)

 

20

EUB707

Twentieth-Century Britain (10 credit)

 

10

EUB722

Modern France: A History of Conflict? (20 credit)

20

EUB723

Modern France: A History of Conflict? (10 credit)

10

EUB724

Slavery In Global History (20 credit)

 

20

EUB725

Slavery in Global History (10 credit)

 

10

 

(iii) ELECTIVE MODULES (total modular weight 10)

Candidates must choose 10 credits from one of the subject groups listed in section 4.1, Part A, Semester 1 (ii) of these Programme specifications. Lists of available modules will be published each year by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations. Choices of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications. As a result of options choices, students may not be registered for more than 70 credits or fewer than 50 credits in any one Semester.

 

Semester 2

 

(i) COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 10)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

EUB708

Crafting a Dissertation

10

 

(ii) OPTIONAL MODULES (total modular weight 40)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

EUB712

Modern Germany: From Racial Dictatorship to Recivilization (20 credits)

20

EUB713

Modern Germany: From Racial Dictatorship to Recivilization (10 credits)

10

EUB714

Modern China in a Global Perspective (20 credits)

20

EUB715

Modern China in a Global Perspective (10 credits)

10

EUB720

The Soviet Union in World Politics (20 credits)

20

EUB721

The Soviet Union in World Politics (10 credits)

10

EUB726

British  Social History, 1918-1979: Other Worlds of Labour (20 credits)

20

EUB727

British Social History, 1918-1979: Other Worlds of Labour (10 credits)

10

EUB633

Enterprise, Employability and Personal Development

10

 

 

(iii) ELECTIVE MODULES (total modular weight 10)

Candidates must choose 10 credits from one of the subject groups listed in section 4.1, Part A, Semester 1 (ii) of these Programme specifications. Lists of available modules will be published each year by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations. Choices of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications. As a result of options choices, students may not be registered for more than 70 credits or fewer than 50 credits in any one Semester.

 

OR – INTERNATIONAL SEMESTER ROUTE

Candidates may replace the modules required for Part B Semester Two with an approved course of study taught in English at a foreign University.  In Semester Two, candidates will undertake assessed work equivalent to 60 credits as follows:

(i) COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 10)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

EUB001

International Semester

50

EUB709

Crafting a Dissertation (Distance Learning)

10

 

Part C – Degree Modules

 

Semesters 1 and 2

In choosing optional and elective subjects, candidates must ensure that they study a minimum of 50 credits in each Semester, including the Dissertation in History which runs across the year and constitutes 20 credits per semester.

 

(i) COMPULSORY MODULES (total modular weight 40)

Code

Title

Modular Weight

EUC701

Dissertation in History

40

 

(ii)        OPTIONAL MODULES (total modular weight 60)

Candidates choose a modular weight of 60 over Semesters 1 and 2.

Module Code

 

Module Title

Module Weight

Semester

EUC702

Muslim Lives: Autobiography, History and Identity

20

1

EUC703

The Beatles and the 1960

 

20

1

EUC711

The Boxer War in China, 1898-1900: A Clash of Civilizations?

20

1

EUC705

The Rise of the Nazis

20

 

2

EUC713

 

From Prohibition to the ‘Swinging Sixties’: The United States 1918-1969

20

2

EUC714

 

The Soviet Security State

20

2

 

(iii) ELECTIVE MODULES (total modular weight 20)

 Semesters 1 and 2

Candidates must choose 20 credits from one of the subject groups listed in section 4.1, Part A, Semester 1 (ii) of these Programme specifications. Lists of available modules will be published each year by the Department of Politics, History and International Relations. Choices of elective subject modules will be subject to satisfying any prerequisites set out in individual module specifications. 

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

In order to progress from Part A to Part B, from Part B to C, and to be eligible for the award of an Honours degree, candidates must not only satisfy the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX but also achieve a module mark of at least 30% in all modules in each Part.

Provision will be made in accordance with Regulation XX for candidates who have the right of reassessment in any Part of the programme to undergo re-assessment in the University’s special assessment period.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the Purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C. The percentage mark for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40%, Part C 60% to determine the final programme percentage mark.

Prospective students

Information on studying at Loughborough University, including course information, facilities, and student experience.

Find out more »