Social Media and Political Communication MA

Entry requirements
2:1 +
Full-time
1 year
Part-time
2 years
Start date
September 2019
UK / EU fee
£8,950
International fee
£18,250
Location
Loughborough

Overview

New for October 2019. On this exciting and unique master’s programme you will gain advanced knowledge of how social media shape how political power is exercised in today’s turbulent world. The curriculum blends world-leading scholarly research with case study analyses of how political communication works in the real world.

The digital age has produced some of the most remarkable developments in modern history. The Arab Spring, Occupy, Brexit, the #MeToo movement, the election of Donald Trump as President of the United States, the growth of online misinformation and automated propaganda, fierce debates over online "filter bubbles" and fake news, the resurgence of the populist right and a new populist left, the growth of online hate speech, mass microtargeting of political messages via email and social media, and concerns about the growing power of social media platforms, algorithms and big data over the lives of citizens. These developments have sent shockwaves around the world.

Amid the chaos there is now an urgent debate about whether the mass use of social media is leading to new types of politics. Do social media help concentrate power in the hands of a small elite? Or do they help decentralise power and engage ordinary citizens in democratic citizenship? Do social media enable individuals and organisations to express themselves, exchange opinions and coordinate with others? Do they encourage the diffusion of propaganda, false information, incivility and hatred? How do social media shape how political beliefs are formed among mass publics?

On this innovative MA programme you will conduct advanced, in-depth analysis of the complex relationships between social media, political influence and power. You will weigh up the consequences for democracy by critically examining how social media shape citizens’ knowledge, participation and empowerment.

Taught by pioneering scholars who are genuine world leaders in the field, the MA Social Media and Political Communication is ideal if you want to build a career in advocacy, campaign management, digital engagement, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, digital advertising, marketing and public relations, or political research, to name but a few.

Alongside the Loughborough Doctoral College training programme, the modules on the MA Social Media and Political Communication also form the perfect foundation for research training during the first year of a PhD in this field funded either by Loughborough’s Online Civic Culture Centre (O3C) (led by Professor Andrew Chadwick), a School of Social Sciences Doctoral Studentship or an ESRC +3 Studentship.

What makes this programme distinctive?

  • The programme focuses on social media and political communication
  • Taught by pioneering, world-leading scholars in political communication

Who should study this programme?

Alongside the Loughborough Doctoral College’s training programme, the modules on the MA Social Media and Political Communication also form the perfect foundation for research training during the first year of a PhD in this field funded by Loughborough’s Online Civic Culture Centre (O3C) (led by Professor Andrew Chadwick), a School of Social Sciences Doctoral Studentship, or an ESRC +3 Studentship. (Note: if you are awarded an ESRC 1+3 Studentship your first year will be spent studying on the MSc Social Science Research: Communication and Media Studies).

Why you should choose us

What you'll study

Social Media and Political Communication

This core module examines the impact of the internet and social media on political life. You will gain an advanced foundational understanding of cutting-edge scholarly research and debates about social media and political power. The module focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new communication technologies on the values, processes, and outcomes of: democratic and authoritarian regimes; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and election campaigns; pressure groups and social movements. You will also examine persistent and controversial problems generated by social media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, the rise of online misinformation, and the balance of power between older and newer media in social and political life. You will have the opportunity to create digital content relevant to the module’s topics.

Data, Power, and Democracy

This module addresses the ways in which social media platforms such as Google, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat are changing the ways in which political actors, citizens and journalists interact with each other, advance their goals and exercise power. It will engage with contemporary arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media by drawing on state-of-the-art theory and research, as well as case studies of relevant contemporary events and controversies. The module will enable students to understand how social media data are used by citizens, political actors, journalists, and platforms themselves to access, distribute and coproduce content that is relevant to public affairs and opportunities for political learning, persuasion, mobilization and engagement. It will use both theory and empirical research to shed light on how social media data are enhancing and hindering citizenship and democratic politics. Students will have the opportunity to design a simulated social media campaign.

Marketing Politics

The aim of this module is to put the social media revolution in context by introducing you to the marketing of politics from a contemporary as well as an historical perspective. A major focus is on understanding the increasingly important role of advertising, public relations and market research techniques, approaches and personnel in attempts to win and maintain voter support for candidates vying for public office. This will be achieved through close analysis of developments in countries with some of the most high-profile elections, notably the United States and United Kingdom. Particular consideration will be devoted to the ethical and democratic consequences of the growing use of “packaged politics”.

Key Debates in Social Media and Political Communication

This module introduces students to key debates and issues relating to the relationships between social media and political communication. Using current real-world examples drawn from a range of national contexts, and current regulations, reports and guidelines relating to current events, the module will allow students to explore the challenges and problems faced by citizens, political actors and communications professionals in these contexts. The course will be organised around guided student presentations.

Researching Communication: Media Users and Cultural Institutions

The aim of this module is to develop knowledge and understanding of a range of methodologies for the analysis of media users and institutions. The module focuses on how qualitative, quantitative and mixed methodologies are applied, identifying their strengths and shortcomings. An indicative list of topics covered in lectures includes: approaches to social research on media users and cultural institutions; interviews; focus groups; ethnographies; surveys and sampling; questionnaire design; social networks analysis; approaches to mixed methods; analysis of data using Nvivo and SPSS.

Researching Communication: Texts and Digital Platforms

The module is designed to introduce students to state-of-the-art research methods that are applied for the analysis of media and communication content and output, both on traditional as well as on new, digital platforms. Apart from providing the students with a critical overview and discussion of strengths and weaknesses of these methods, both quantitative and qualitative, the module enables them to explore their practical application in adjacent workshops. The module will cover some of the most commonly used methods and techniques for researching communication, including content analysis, thematic analysis, critical discourse analysis, conversation analysis, sentiment analysis, and social media data analysis.

Dissertation in Social Media and Political Communication

This module develops your employability and research skills relevant to conducting an individual research project. With mentoring and individual supervision by an academic, you will undertake a piece of research on a social media and political communication topic of your choice, and pursue this research rigorously and in depth.

Political Psychology

This module introduces students to key issues and debates in the interdisciplinary field of political psychology. Political psychology explains how psychological processes shape political behaviour and how political events shape our beliefs. You will study the nature and origins of public opinion formation and the cognitive underpinnings of persuasion, prejudice and political engagement in both its positive and negative senses. The module includes topics such as the study of political behaviour; public opinion; collective memory; national identity; the political psychology of extremism, destructive obedience and genocide; social representations of history and politics; and political rhetoric.

Digital Futures: Explorations in New Media

The aim of this module is to consider contemporary approaches to the economic, social and cultural impact of digital technologies. On completion of the module, you should be able to identify and deploy the major theories and frameworks of inquiry relevant to digital technology; evaluate critically the conceptual and methodological strengths and weaknesses of contending positions; and understand and apply the research methods relevant to the module topics.

Digital Economies

The internet is playing an increasing role in the lives of people around the globe and in the process is transforming many aspects of the ways in which we interact; yet this is a landscape that is contoured by the structure of the global economic system. This module will examine the variety of roles that are implicated in the creation, delivery, and consumption of cultural/media products over the internet and the symbolic struggles that have occurred over legitimacy in digital culture. For example, we can trace a continuing tension between the growth of the digital market economy and advocacy of the internet as a de-commercialised space. While the primary focus will be on contemporary cases, the module will also seek to relate these back to classic issues in economic sociology.

Global Communication

The aim of the module is for the student to become familiar with the different theoretical perspectives underpinning the study of the media in the international environment. You will identify the structures and processes involved in global communication environment and describe contemporary media developments in this context. You will also be able to discuss and critically evaluate a range of theories and concepts such as cultural imperialism and hybridity, and identify their strengths and shortcomings.

Media and Cultural Industries: Political Economy and Public Policy

The aim of the module is to outline the major conceptual and empirical questions raised by work on the political economy of the cultural and media industries and on the sociology and anthropology of cultural and media production. Students will examine the changes that have taken place in the cultural and media industries under the impact of technological change and marketisation since the 1970s and explore the questions these changes raise for public policy.

Digital Cultures

This module fosters students' ability to critically analyse current research and advanced scholarship about digital cultures. It familiarises students with major debates, theories and latest studies on issues such as young people and digital media, social networking, identities, communities and relationships and online consumption. An indicative list of topics covered in lectures includes the internet and identity, online communities, mobile media, social networking, digital media and romantic/sexual relations, digital media and consumption.

The Politics of Representation

This module develops critical understanding of current debates and advanced research about the politics of representation and develops skills relevant to the analysis of the involvement of media and cultural forms in social inclusion and exclusion. An indicative list of topics covered on the module includes discourse, power, knowledge; stereotyping and the other; spaces of identity and belonging; nationalism, racism and imperialism; orientalism; migration and the media.

Media and Cultural Work

This module covers the major conceptual and empirical questions raised by research on media and cultural work. It analyses the changes that have taken place in media and media cultural work under the impact of technological change, marketisation and internationalisation since the 1970s, as well as the extent and nature of inequalities and discrimination in media and cultural work. An indicative list of topics covered in lectures includes the growth in employment in media and cultural industries; the changing character of that employment; the internationalisation of media and cultural labour; the extent and nature of inequalities and discrimination in media and cultural work, for example, on the grounds of gender and ethnicity.

How you'll be assessed

You will be assessed by a variety of coursework plus a dissertation of 10,000 words on an agreed topic.

How you'll study

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Independent study
  • Group work
  • Supervision
  • Workshops
  • Practical sessions

Where you'll study

Your personal and professional development

Loughborough University prides itself on the high calibre of its graduates and provides great opportunities for students to develop the skills and attributes they need to progress successfully in their chosen careers.

Future career prospects

The MA Social Media and Political Communication is ideal if you want to build a career in advocacy, campaign management, digital engagement, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, digital advertising, marketing and public relations, or political research, to name but a few. It is also the perfect foundation for further study toward a PhD in political communication.

Employability is an important part of the curriculum across all of our MA programmes. All students (apart from those taking modules as part of their PhD) will take taught employability sessions which cover finding employment in the communication industries, finding placements, writing CVs and preparing covering letters.

In the second term students take a Media Landscapes class as part of the dissertation module. In this class visiting speakers working in the media and communication sector give guest lectures to students, providing insights into the sector and the roles in which they work. This is also an excellent networking opportunity for keen students.

You will have the opportunity to get involved in LSU Media, the Loughborough Students’ Union media centre, which creates a diverse range of original web, video and radio content. The centre is run by students for students and gives those wishing to augment their academic degree the opportunity to develop their vocational skills.

In collaboration with the Academic Language Support Service we have designed a bespoke package of study skills support, which is run through the dissertation module in the first term. It will support you in using and interpreting academic literature, referencing, critical thinking and developing your own writing style.

On successful completion of the programme, you will possess a wide range of knowledge and skills. For the programme learning outcomes in detail see here.

Entry requirements

Our entry requirements are listed using standard UK undergraduate degree classifications i.e. first-class honours, upper second-class honours and lower second-class honours. To learn the equivalent for your country, please choose it from the dropdown below.

Entry requirements for United Kingdom

An honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent overseas qualification in the social sciences or humanities. Applicants with appropriate professional expertise will also be considered.

All applicants for admission to Loughborough University must have a qualification in English language before they can be admitted to any course or programme, whether their first language is English or not.

IELTS: 6.5 with a minimum score of 6.5 in all elements.

Algeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Algeria - 15/20 12.5/20

Argentina

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Argentina 8.5 7.5 6.0

Australia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Australia First class Upper second Lower second

Azerbaijan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Azerbaijan 4.5 4.0 3.5

Bahrain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bahrain GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Bangladesh

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bangladesh – BUET 1st (60%) 2nd (52%) 2nd (50%)
Other universities 1st (70%) 1st (60%) 2nd (53%)

Belarus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Belarus 9 8 6.5

Belgium

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Belgium 80% (Magna Cum Laude) 70% (Laude) 60%

Brazil

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brazil 8.5 7.5 6.0

Brunei

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Brunei First Upper second Lower second

Bulgaria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Bulgaria 6 5 4

Cameroon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Cameroon - 14/20 or Bien (GPA 3.4) 12.5/20 or Assez Bien (GPA 3.1)

Canada

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Canada GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Chile

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Chile 6.0 5.0 4.5

China

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Shanghai Rank Top 250 85% 80% 77%
Shanghai Rank Top 251 - 500 89% 83% 80%
Shanghai Rank 500+ 92% 86% 82%

Further information

Colombia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Colombia 4.5 3.5 3.0

Croatia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Croatia 4.5 3.8 3.0

Cuba

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Cuba 5 4 3

Cyprus

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Cyprus 8.5 7.0 6.5

Czech Republic

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Czech Republic 1.2 2.2 2.7

Denmark

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Denmark 12/12 10/10 7/4

Ecuador

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Ecuador 8.5 (85%) 7.5 (75%) 6 (60%)

Egypt

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Egypt 3.7 3.2 2.7

Finland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Finland 3 (out of 3) or 3.3 (out of 5) 2 (out of 3) or 2.5 (out of 5) 1 (out of 3) or 1.3 (out of 5)

France

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
France 14 12 11

Germany

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Germany 1.5 2.5 3.0

Ghana

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Ghana First Upper second Lower second

Greece

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Greece 8.5 7.0 6.5

Hong Kong

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Hong Kong GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

India

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Institutions listed on the Indian Ranking of Higher Educational Institutions Framework 65% (First) 60% (First) 55% (Upper second)
All other Indian institutions 70% (First with distinction) 65% (First) 60% (First)

Indonesia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Indonesia - 3.3 (3.7) 3 (3.3)

Iran

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iran 18 16 14

Iraq

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Iraq 85% 80% 75%

Ireland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Republic of Ireland First Upper second Lower second

Israel

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Israel 95% 80% 75%

Italy

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Italy 109/110 104/110 100/110

Japan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Japan 85% 80% 70%

Jordan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Jordan GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Kazakhstan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kazakhstan 4.5 4.0 3.5

Kenya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kenya First / 70% / A Upper second / 65% / B Lower second / 55% / B-C

Kosovo

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kosovo 10 9 8

Kuwait

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Kuwait GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Lebanon

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lebanon American 90% 80% 70%
Lebanon French 18 15 12

Libya

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
BSc Engineering, Architecture, Medicine 85 80 75
Other Bachelor degree from a University - 85% 80%

Lithuania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Lithuania 9 8 7

Macau

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macau - 2:1 / B / 3.0 2:2 / C / 2.5

Macedonia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Macedonia 7.5 6.7 6

Malawi

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
MSc Degree 75% 70% 65%
BSc Degree - 80% 80%

Malaysia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Malaysia GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Mexico

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Mexico 9 8 7

Morocco

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Morocco - 15 13

Namibia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Namibia 80% 70% 60%

Netherlands

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Netherlands 8 7 6

New Zealand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
New Zealand First (A/A+) Upper second (B+/A-) Lower second (B-/B)

Nigeria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Nigeria 7 point Scale 6 5 4
Nigeria 5 point scale 4.5 3.8 3.5
Nigeria 4 point scale 3.5 3 2.5

Norway

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Norway A (1.5) B (2.5) C (3.2)

Oman

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Oman GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Pakistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Pakistan Public Universities (Tech or Eng) 4 Year degree only First with distinction (75%) / 4.0 First (65%) / 3.2 Second (59%) / 2.6
Pakistan Private Universities (Tech or Eng) 4 Year degree only First with Distinction (85%) First (75%) First (65%)
Pakistan Masters (2 or 3 year Bachelor plus Masters) First Second (55%) Second

Palestine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Palestine - B+ / 85% / 3.3 B / 80% / 3.0

Peru

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Peru 16 14 12

Philippines

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Philippines Summa Cum Laude 4.0 / 96% Magna cum Laude 3.5 / 92% Cum Laude 3.0 / 87%

Poland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Poland 5 (Very good) 4 (Good) 3.5

Portugal

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Portugal 18 16 14

Qatar

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Qatar GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Romania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Romania 8.5 7.5 6.5

Russia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Russia 4.5 4.0 3.5

Rwanda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Rwanda - 2:1, 16/20, 70% 2:2, 14/20, 60%

Saudi Arabia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Saudi Arabia GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Singapore

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Singapore First Upper second Lower second

Slovenia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Slovenia 9.5 8.5 7

South Africa

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
South Africa 1st / 75% - 100% 2.1 / 70% - 74% 2.2 / 60% - 69%

South Korea

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
South Korea 4.0 / A 3.0 / B 2.5 / C+

Spain

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Spain 9.0 7.5 6.5

Sri Lanka

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sri Lanka 70% 60% 55%

Sudan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Sudan (North and South) 70% 66% 60%

Switzerland

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Switzerland 6 5 4

Syria

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Syria 85% 75% 65%

Taiwan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Taiwan Prestigious National Universities 80% 75% 73%
Taiwan Excellent Universities 83% 78% 75%
Taiwan Good Universities 88% 83% 80%

Tanzania

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tanzania 1st 2:1 2:2

Thailand

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Thailand GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

Tunisia

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Tunisia 15 13 11

Turkey

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Turkey 3.5 2.8 2.2

Turkmenistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Turkmenistan - 4.5 4

Uganda

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Uganda First Upper second Lower second

Ukraine

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Ukraine 5 4.5 4

United Arab Emirates

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
United Arab Emirates GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.0 2.8

United States of America

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
United States of America GPA 4.0 scale 3.5 3.2 2.8

Uzbekistan

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Uzbekistan 90% / 85% 80% / 75% 75% / 65%

Venezuela

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Venezuela - 16/20 or 7.0/9 14/20 or 6.5/9

Vietnam

First-class honours (70%) Upper second-class honours (60%) Lower second-class honours (50%)
Vietnam 8.0 7.0 6.0

English language requirements

Applicants must meet the minimum English Language requirements. Further details are available on the International website.

Fees and funding

UK / EU fee

Full-time degree per annum
£8,950

International fee

Full-time degree per annum
£18,250

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. University fees and charges can be paid in advance and there are several methods of payment, including online payments and payment by instalment. Special arrangements are made for payments by part-time students.

Student loans Scholarships Career Development Loans External charities and loans Alumni bursary