Centre for Research in Communication and Culture

Events

CRCC Reading Group

The CRCC reading group runs in partnership with the University of Michigan, it provides the opportunity for researchers in the social sciences to discuss readings chosen between the two universities.

The readings are oriented to Global Media and Communication research.

The reading group is held every month Thursday at 1pm in Brockington U1.22. The series is jointly organised by:

  • Nathan Ritchie, Julia Giese and Manuel Torres-Sahli at Loughborough University

Contact us at: n.ritchie@lboro.ac.uk

Programme

This semester we will be taking readings from Christian Fuchs book 'The Critical Theory of Communication: New Readings of Lukacs, Adorno, Marcuse, Honneth and Habermas in the age of the internet'

Date

Reading

21/02/2019


CHAPTER 2 Georg Lukács as a Communications Scholar: Cultural and Digital Labour in the Context of Lukács’ Ontology of Social Being

 

(pp. 47-74)

The task of this chapter is to apply thoughts from Georg Lukács’ final book, theOntology of Social Being,for the analysis of cultural and digital labour. Section 2 discusses Lukács’ concept of work and communication and relates them to the analysis of cultural and digital work. Section 3 focuses on his analysis of labour and ideology and points out how we can make use of it for the critical understanding of social media ideologies. Section 4 draws some conclusions. This chapter also introduces theOntology’s main ideas on work and culture, which is important because large parts of the..

21/03/2019

CHAPTER 4 Herbert Marcuse and Social Media

 (pp. 111-152)

Douglas Kellner and Clayton Pierce (2014, 1) argue that ‘Herbert Marcuse synthesized Hegelian, Marxian and other currents of modern philosophy and modern philosophy in an attempt to reconstruct the Marxian theory in accordance with changes in the trajectory of modern culture, politics, and society’. Peter Marcuse (2014, 433) writes that his father’s achievement was that he analysed ‘political conflicts, economic conflicts, and cultural conflicts – and, quite centrally and profoundly, how these conflicts relate to each other’. Given the breadth and depth of Marcuse’s Marxist theory of society, it is rewarding to ask how it can help us to understand aspects...

25/04/2019

CHAPTER 6 Beyond Habermas: Rethinking Critical Theories of Communication

 (pp. 177-206)

One can often hear that we live in an information or knowledge society. These claims are overstated and often driven by businesses expectations that digital media is an investment area that can help achieving large profits. In 2014, 13.1 per cent of the 2,000 largest transnational corporations’ revenues and 17.3 per cent of their profits were located in the information sector.¹

The FIRE (finance, insurance, real estate) sector held 19.8% of the revenues, 24.0 per cent were held by the mobilities industry,² and 21.7 per cent by the classical manufacturing sector. These sectors’ shares of the 2,000 largest TNCs combined...

23/05/2019

CHAPTER 7 Conclusion

 (pp. 207-220)

The task of this book is to present readings on specific works of selected Frankfurt School thinkers and to thereby open up the discussion on cultural Marxism to new frontiers. These openings are the opening of Marxism to culture and communication, the opening of the way we read cultural Marxism from single, dominant texts towards alternative, less well-known works, and the opening of discourse in cultural Marxism from the focus on single thinkers towards a plural dialogue and unity in diversity. The chapters in this book can be read independently, but are also connected to each other. The conclusion aims...

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