School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

Events

6 October 2021

Stress, sitting time and physical activity caloric equivalents

Presented By NCSEM
  • Wednesday 6 October 2021, 17:30 - 19:15
  • Online
  • Visit event website
  • Ticket Information

    Wednesday 6 October 2021, 17:30-19:15

    This event will take place online. It is free of charge and aimed at healthcare professionals, and is also open to anyone with an interest in the topic.

    To book your place please click here and complete the booking form. You will be emailed details of how to access the online talk the day before the event.

    If you have any questions about this event please email Alison Stanley at NCSEM-Education@lboro.ac.uk.

     

About this event

Professor Amanda Daley: How many minutes of walking does it take to burn off the calories in a pizza?

PACE food labelling seeks to provide calorie information with an interpretation of what the calorie content of the food/drink item or meal means for energy expenditure. For example, ‘the kilocalories in this pizza require 120 minutes of walking to expend’. Displaying calorie content in an easily understandable format is important given evidence indicating that the public consistently underestimate the energy content of food when labelling is not provided. Evidence from systematic reviews and trials testing the effects of PACE labelling point to the benefits of inclusion on food/drinks labels and menus. However, several criticisms of this labelling system have been raised. This presentation will explore the issues and opportunities related to using PACE food labelling.

Dr Nicola Paine: Should I be stressed about my health? The link between psychological stress and physical health

Episodes of acute psychological stress are a risk factor for cardiovascular disease development and have also been reported as a trigger for acute cardiovascular events. The magnitude of the cardiovascular responses to acute psychological stress can be predictive of the risk of future cardiovascular disease development and outcomes. This talk will consist of a brief overview of research relating to this, including mechanisms that might underpin this.

Dr Stacy Clemes: Sedentary behaviour and cardiometabolic health: an update from the most recent evidence

This talk will give an introduction to sedentary behaviour including how sedentary behaviour is defined, what is its prevalence and why we should be concerned. It will examine the associations between sedentary behaviour and cardiometabolic health and review the most recent evidence. The talk will also consider how much sitting is too much and if we accumulate our sitting matters.