School of Business and Economics

Events

28 November 2022

Psychological Factors Explaining Ukrainian Refugee Entrepreneurs’ Venture Idea Novelty

Presented By IBSI in conjunction with the Global Refugee Entrepreneurship Network
  • 3.00pm UK time
  • MS Teams
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About this event

Psychological Factors Explaining Ukrainian Refugee Entrepreneurs’ Venture Idea Novelty

Kim Klyver, Paul Steffens & Benson Honig

Professor Kim Klyver, University of Southern Denmark, will talk about findings from a recent collaboration with Google called We Start, which aimed to support Ukrainian refugees recently facing displacement. A key finding of the project is that the “crisis domain” of self-efficacy is more important than the “entrepreneurship domain” for our sample of refugee entrepreneurs. That is, it is more important that these refugee entrepreneurs believe they are able to cope with their crisis situation rather than perform various entrepreneurial tasks. Kim will talk about the project's findings in more detail and discuss the relevance to practice and theory.

See an abstract of the study and read an open access copy below:

Abstract:

In this study we investigate the (relative) importance of four psychological factors previously identify as important for entrepreneurship in adversity. Specifically, we investigate the importance of personal initiative, individual resilience, entrepreneurial self-efficacy and crisis self-efficacy for new venture novelty among Ukrainian refugee entrepreneurs arriving in Denmark in 2022 early after the Russian invasion. We identify and surveyed a sample of Ukrainian refugee entrepreneurs through Google’s training program labelled ‘WeStart for Ukrainians’. We found that crisis self-efficacy seems to be the most important psychological factor explaining new venture novelty among refugee entrepreneurs.

Keywords: Crisis Response; Refugees; Venture Idea Novelty; Personal Initiative; Resilience; Entrepreneurial Self-efficacy; Crisis Self-efficacy.

Link to Open Access paper: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2352673422000464

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