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Loughborough University

Politics, History & International Relations

Academics

Max Edling
Lecturer in Modern History

Email: M.M.Edling@lboro.ac.uk
Tel. Secretary: +44 (0)1509 222991
Fax: +44 (0)1509 223917
Department of Politics, History and International Relations
Loughborough University
Loughborough
Leics.
LE11 3TU
UK

 

Biography

A native of Sweden I did my undergraduate training at the University of Lund. I then moved on to Trinity College, Dublin, where I earned an MPhil in Peace and Conflict Studies and then to the University of Cambridge where I did my PhD in History. I also have a PhD in Political Science from Stockholm University. My field of research is United States history, particularly the founding and the early federal government. I have published extensively on the U.S. Constitution, taxation and public finance, and state formation. Currently I am finishing a book on the financing of U.S. wars and territorial expansion from the adoption of the Constitution to the Civil War. Before joining Loughborough University I taught in the History Department at Uppsala University in Sweden. I have held visiting appointments at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Cornell University and Stanford Humanities Center and I serve on the editorial board of The Journal of Early American History and American Political Thought: A Journal of Ideas and Institutions

Publications

Books

A Revolution in Favor of Government: Origins of the U.S. Constitution and the Making of the American State (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003 [pbk 2008]).

Co-edited with Patrik Winton, A Necessary Evil: The Public Debt in Sweden and the United States, 1776-1865 (Opuscula Historica Upsaliensia 38, 2009) (in Swedish).

Articles and book chapters

“A More Perfect Union: The Framing of the Constitution,” in Edward Grey and Jane Kamensky, eds., Oxford History Handbooks: The American Revolution (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2012).

“A Mongrel Kind of Government:” The U.S. Constitution, the Federal Union, and the Origins of the American State in Peter Onuf and Peter Thompson, eds., State and Citizen in British America and the Early United States, 1763-1865 (University of Virginia Press, forthcoming 2012).

“Jeffersonian Political Economy,” in Frank Cogliano, ed., The Blackwell Companion to Thomas Jefferson (Blackwell, 2011).
 
“The Strange Hybrid of the Early American State,” in Hans Joas and Barbro Klein, eds., The Benefit of Broad Horizons: Intellectual and Institutional Preconditions for a Global Social Science. Festschrift for Björn Wittrock on the Occasion of his 65th Birthday (Brill Academic Publishers, 2010), 15-32.

“A Tale of Two Republics: Financing the Mexican War,” in Max M. Edling and Patrik Winton, eds., A Necessary Evil: The Public Debt in Sweden and the United States, 1776-1865 (Opuscula Historica Upsaliensia 38, 2009) (in Swedish).

(with Patrik Winton), “A Necessary Evil: Public Debts in History,” in Max M. Edling and Patrik Winton, eds., A Necessary Evil: The Public Debt in Sweden and the United States, 1776-1865 (Opuscula Historica Upsaliensia 38, 2009) (in Swedish).

“Constitution, Federal” Princeton Encyclopedia of United States Political History, ed. Michael Kazin (Princeton University Press, 2009), 198-206. Reprinted in The Concise Princeton Encyclopedia of United States Political History (2011).

“The Starting Point of the Constitutional Revolution: American Constitutional Development from the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution,” in Margareta Brundin and Magnus Isberg, eds., Balance of Power and Limited Government: The Events, Ideas, and Constitutional Reforms of 1809 from the Perspective of Two Centuries (Sveriges Riksdag, 2009), 77-112 (in Swedish).

“The Origin, Structure and Development of the American Fiscal Regime, 1789-1837,” in Alexander Neutzenadel and Christoph Strupp, eds., Taxation, State and Civil Society in Germany and the United States, 1750-1950 (Nomos Publishers, 2007), 25-49.

“’So Immense a Power in the Affairs of War’: Alexander Hamilton and the Restoration of Public Credit,” William and Mary Quarterly, vol. 64: 2 (April, 2007), 287-326.

(with Mark D. Kaplanoff), “Alexander Hamilton’s Fiscal Reform: Transforming the Structure of Taxation in the Early Republic,” William and Mary Quarterly vol. 61: 4 (Oct. 2004), 714-37.