Undergraduate study

Undergraduate

Chemical Engineering

Chemical Engineering

Award Course length Course code Typical offer Start date End date
MEng (Hons) DIS/DIntS 5 years full-time sandwich H802 A*AA 1 October 2018 21 June 2023
MEng (Hons) 4 years full-time H803 A*AA 1 October 2018 22 June 2022
BEng (Hons) DIS/DIntS 4 years full-time sandwich H806 AAB 1 October 2018 22 June 2022
BEng (Hons) 3 years full-time H805 AAB 1 October 2018 16 June 2021

8th

for Chemical Engineering in the UK

The Guardian University Guide 2018

£27,000

average starting salary

DLHE, 2016 graduates

91%

of employed graduates in professional or managerial roles

2nd

in the UK for Overall Satisfaction in Chemical, Process and Energy Engineering

National Student Survey, 2017

Chemical Engineering course overview

Chemical Engineering is concerned with the processing of raw materials into products on a commercial scale. It can also be described as process engineering.

The products from Chemical Engineering operations are seen all around us including, for example, petrol, pharmaceuticals, food, drinking water, paints, cosmetics and clothing.

The principles underpinning the manufacture of these products include mass and energy balances, thermodynamics, fluid flow and heat transfer, chemical reactor theory, mixing and separation processes, process control, plant safety and process economics.

The main supporting subjects are mathematics and the physical sciences, backed up by computing, together with some chemistry.

Principles and theories are essential for understanding real processes but students also need to develop professional competence. We develop our students’ capabilities from the outset through experimental work, design and research projects as well as computer simulations. Engineers working in industry participate in some of our design exercises and help keep them realistic. Oral and written presentations given by students help develop their confidence in communicating ideas.

Teaching facilities
Our world class laboratories allow you the opportunity to gain practical hands on experience with industry scale equipment, offering students an enhanced learning experience.

We have invested £4 million into the facilities in our S-Building, home to our Chemical Engineering Department. This means new laboratory space and equipment has been installed since 2016 including:

State of the art teaching laboratories which are extremely well equipped with over 50 pilot-plant and bench scale laboratory experiments for practical work and projects.

A new 87 seater IT Laboratory – for taught sessions, but also available for project work and private study.

A new Interactive Learning Facility – the “Igloo” that uses state-of-the-art software to create simulations of real-life engineering scenarios, e.g. working in hazardous areas of industrial plants. Thiswill allow small groups of students to engage with realistic situations in a safe and accessible environment.

 

Brand new STEMLab

Take a virtual tour of STEMLab, our brand new state-of-the-art laboratory facility. It forms part of a wider £25M investment in the West Park of our campus, the home of our Engineering Schools.

Modules


Year 1 MEng and BEng modules

Year 1 MEng and BEng modules
The modules in Year 1 bridge from entry levels of science and maths, and introduce the basic concepts of Chemical Engineering such as mass and energy balances, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, process design, and process economics.

This is supported by laboratories running through the year.

French, German or Spanish may be taken as an option.

The descriptions below are designed to give a taste of what each module involves and are not formal module descriptions or specifications.

Fluid Mechanics I - concerns the flow of liquids and gases, and introduces concepts such as viscosity, laminar and turbulent flow. The course enables students to design pumps/piping systems and understand the principles of flow measurement.

Stagewise Processes - Many chemical processes such as liquid-liquid extractors and plate columns can be regarded as a sequence of stages. This module shows show such systems can be analysed.

Chemical and Biochemical Processes - includes industrial chemistry (revising some A level chemistry), biochemistry (proteins, polysaccharides, lipids, nucleic acids, enzymes) and microbiology (microorganisms and viruses).

Heat Transfer - Almost all processes require heating and/or cooling. This module introduces concepts of conduction, convection and radiation to enable students to design heat transfer equipment and calculate heat leakage to and from plant items and pipes. The module also teaches AUTOCAD – an engineering drawing software package.

Thermodynamics I - introduces the laws of thermodynamics which has practical value in calculating the power outputs or requirements of pumps and compressors, and also of refrigerators and heat pumps.

Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering - revises/introduces the maths required in our Chemical Engineering programmes, with plenty of Chemical Engineering examples to illustrate relevance.

Process Balances - introduces the concepts of mass and energy balances, which are often simple (sometimes complex) but nevertheless essential tools in the analysis of almost all process plant. The module also introduces process economics - to answer the question: “will my plant make any money?”

Laboratory - This is a practical module whereby students spend an afternoon every week performing either experiments in pairs or other activities alternating between the following:

• experiments in our chemical engineering laboratory (mainly in heat transfer and fluid mechanics) to reinforce and support material covered in other first year modules,
• experiments in STEMLAB (chemistry and biochemistry related e.g. solvent extraction and enzyme kinetics),
• in our “igloo” virtual reality dome interacting with a simulation of a chemical plant,
• in semester 1 you take computer labs where you learn how to prepare professional quality reports and presentations using Microsoft Word, Excel and PowerPoint,
• in semester 2 a design project brings together year 1 material.

Chemical Engineering and Society - looks at the impact of chemical processes on wider society, including life cycle analysis, business ethics, regulatory assessments and intellectual property.

Language - French, German or Spanish at either beginner, intermediate or advanced level.

Year 2 MEng and BEng

Year 2

Modules in this part of the course aim to develop core Chemical Engineering subjects such as separation processes, mass transfer operations, safety and loss prevention, and control.

Options include Food Engineering, French, German or Spanish.

We place particular emphasis on the development of communication skills through project and design work, and briefings on industrial practice, all of which is particularly useful for those about to embark on a professional development (sandwich) year.

The descriptions below are designed to give a taste of what each module involves and are not formal module descriptions or specifications.

Thermodynamics II - extends the concepts of thermodynamics to enable the calculation of equilibrium constants for use in chemical reactors and also vapour liquid separation devices (such as distillation columns and flash tanks).

Instrumentation and Control - All modern process plants are run using automatic control systems. This module shows what equipment is needed and how the majority of plants are controlled.

Process Design and Safety - introduces students to the stages involved in progressing a process design from early inception to a detailed plant design with particular emphasis on inherent safety principles. Design is very different type of activity from answering examination questions but most closely resembles what actual chemical engineers do in their jobs. Students benefit from exposure to this type of activity in both year 1 and year 2 before meeting their final year design.

Reaction Engineering I - extends A level Physical Chemistry to look at continuous as well as batch reactors.

Plant Engineering - deals with the structural aspects of plant design, including the design of pressure vessels, storage tanks and structural supports.

Particle Technology - Most products of the chemical industry are solid based. This module introduces the physics of solid particles in fluids and relevant processes such as sedimentation, centrifugation and filtration.

Process Systems Engineering - looks at a typical software design package used in industry to simulate whole process plants. This includes hands-on computer labs along with supporting lectures to understand what calculations the software performs.

Fluid Mechanics II - Looks at advanced flow topics including compressible and open channel flow, and using computational fluid dynamics software to simulate flows in equipment and pipework of more complex geometries.

Mass Transfer and Separations - deals with the analysis of distillation columns and gas absorbers using both packed columns and plate columns.

Food Engineering – Chemical engineers are widely employed in the food industry. This module covers aspects of microbiology relevant to food safety, explores the more difficult flow behaviour of food materials (such as tomato ketchup), and shows how chemical engineering concepts can be readily applied to food processes such as canning, drying, freezing and frying.

Language - French, German or Spanish at either beginner, intermediate or advanced level. 

Diploma in Industrial Studies (DIS)

Following the preparation and placement process in Year 2, those students on sandwich (DIS) courses will now enter their year in industry.

Close links are maintained with industrial tutors at the University through reports and visits to students.

MEng students can elect to undertake their year in industry either at the end of the second or the third year.

Year 3 BEng (year 4 for BEng DIS)

Year 3 BEng

This part of the course blends core and optional subjects such as reaction engineering, transfer processes, process control, biochemical engineering, and pollution control. Students also undertake a research project.

Much of the final semester is taken up with a major design project for which students make use of the knowledge and skills they have gained at University and in industry to design a chemical process plant.

Options include Biochemical Engineering, Process Economics and Design Optimisation, and Research Methods.

The descriptions below are designed to give a taste of what each module involves and are not formal module descriptions or specifications.

Transfer Processes - is an advanced course in heat and mass transfer including diffusion, surface tension, turbulence, transient heat and mass transfer, drying and crystallisation processes.

Reaction Engineering II - extends the material of part B to cover catalysis (using catalyst pellets), reactor optimisation and stability, and different types of reactor.

Chemical Process Control - extends the material of part B and examines the mathematical methods underpinning the design of control systems to optimise stability and response.

Process Economics and Design Optimisation - shows how process plants should be viewed as a business investment to be compared with any other. As well as quantifying the economic return of a plant, it also shows how process plant variables can be optimised to maximise return on investment subject to legal, environmental and safety constraints.

Research Methods - prepares students with generic research and presentation skills for use in the forthcoming Professional Development Project.

Literature Review - is an original literature survey of 5000 words written by the student on a current Chemical Engineering topic.

Pollution Control - surveys the legal requirements and processing options and for reducing environmental pollution including filtration, sedimentation, electrostatic precipitation, gas scrubbers and the use of microbes.

Biochemical Engineering - studies fermentation processes involving micro-organisms or enzymes, including the practicalities of bioreactor design and operation.

Research Project - is a half semester long project whereby students (in pairs) perform original research under the supervision of an academic member of staff. The results are written up as a research paper.

Process Design Project - is the grand finale of the BEng degree where students can display their Chemical Engineering knowledge and creativity in designing a process. The half semester long project involves both group work in formulating a flowsheet as part of a team of 4 or 5 people, and individual work in designing the separate unit operations that make up the process.

Year 3 and 4 MEng

Year 3 MEng
This year comprises a blend of core subjects as for BEng, but with broadening modules and those that provide greater depth in chemical engineering subjects such as Process Dynamics, and students also take two management options.

Year 3 includes a one semester Professional Development Project which may be undertaken either in industry, abroad on a University exchange or at Loughborough.

The descriptions below are designed to give a taste of what each module involves and are not formal module descriptions or specifications.

Transfer Processes - is an advanced course in heat and mass transfer including diffusion, surface tension, turbulence, transient heat and mass transfer, drying and crystallisation processes.

Reaction Engineering II - extends the material of part B to cover catalysis (using catalyst pellets), reactor optimisation and stability, and different types of reactor.

Chemical Process Control - extends the material of part B and examines the mathematical methods underpinning the design of control systems to optimise stability and response.

Process Economics and Design Optimisation - shows how process plants should be viewed as a business investment to be compared with any other. As well as quantifying the economic return of a plant, it also shows how process plant variables can be optimised to maximise return on investment subject to legal, environmental and safety constraints.

Research Methods - prepares students with generic research and presentation skills for use in the forthcoming Professional Development Project.

Operations Management - is concerned with the management and logistical issues required to deliver products or services of the desired quality on time, on cost and at the right location

Business Systems - This module shows how systems (mainly involving IT) can be used to support planning, decision making and control in a business environment.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation - is concerned with the generation of ideas and how to commercialise them, particularly via the creation of small businesses.

Professional Development Project (PDP) - is a semester long individual project that can either be spent in industry, at an overseas partner university or in the Department of Chemical

Engineering at Loughborough - A PDP spent in industry differs from the sandwich year in that the focus is on a single project (rather than multiple projects) and a report is submitted to and assessed by the Department of Chemical Engineering at Loughborough as part of the degree. PDPs based at Loughborough and overseas universities are usually research projects under the supervision of an academic member of staff at the university concerned and written up as a research paper.

Literature Review - is an original literature survey of 5000 words written by the student on a topic related to their PDP.


Year 4 MEng
The descriptions below are designed to give a taste of what each module involves and are not formal module descriptions or specifications.

Chemical Product Design - Modern Chemical Engineering is not only concerned with designing and running processes, but also how the resultant products serve a particular function. This module explores the drivers and methods needed to bring a successful product to market from the initial identification of customer needs.

Advanced Biochemical Engineering - explores the opportunities provided by viruses, bacteria, yeast, insect cells, animal cells, human cells for creating products of value to mankind. The module covers the different types of bioreactors currently available and the scale up and scale down of processes.

Downstream Processing - looks in detail at a variety of purification methods including liquid-liquid extraction, crystallisation, spray drying, gas phase absorption, ion exchange, chromatography methods, electrophoresis, ultrafiltration and microfiltration.

Filtration - This module provides detailed information on all aspects of filtration including filter types, equipment selection, operating methods and filtration calculations.

Interfacial Science and Engineering - is concerned with understanding and using particles/droplets/bubbles/molecules on a very small length scale (between 1 nanometer and 100 micrometers) where chemical and electrostatic surface forces dominate behaviour.

Mixing of Fluids and Particles - is a common headache across many industries. This module provides the essential theory of mixing and how it can affect final product properties.

Clean Chemical Energy and Sustainability - looks at the science and engineering principles of clean chemical energy conversions - primarily fuel cell technology and bio-energy utilisation.

Advanced Process Systems Engineering - helps prepare students for their Final Year Design Project. The module provides training in mathematical modelling, numerical tools and environmental aspects of plant design.

Process Design Project - is the grand finale of the MEng degree where students can display their Chemical Engineering knowledge and creativity in designing a process. The semester long project involves both group work in formulating a flowsheet as part of a team of 4 or 5 people, and individual work in designing the separate unit operations that make up the process. The process is usually one that involves a novel product or application and so students have no standard design that they feel compelled to replicate. The design often involves experimental work to provide data that cannot be found from literature sources.

Please note: optional modules are subject to availability and timetable permitting.

For indicative information on modular weight, content and assessment type please see module specifications.

For an indicative overview of the aims, learning outcomes and structure of this course please see the programme specification for BEng and MEng variants.


The information above reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. Updates may be made on an annual basis and revised details will be published through Programme Specifications ahead of each academic year. Please see Terms and Conditions of Study for more information

H802 Chemical Engineering - MEng (Hons) DIS/DIntS

A-Level
A*AA including Mathematics and at least one from Chemistry or Physics
IB
38 (7,6,6 HL) including Mathematics and at least one of Chemistry or Physics at HL
BTEC
BTEC Level 3 National Diploma: D*D plus A Level Mathematics at grade A
Relevant subjects include Applied Science, Engineering

H803 Chemical Engineering - MEng (Hons)

A-Level
A*AA including Mathematics and at least one from Chemistry or Physics
IB
38 (7,6,6 HL) including Mathematics and at least one of Chemistry or Physics at HL
BTEC
BTEC Level 3 National Diploma: D*D plus A Level Mathematics at grade A
Relevant subjects include Applied Science, Engineering

H806 Chemical Engineering - BEng (Hons) DIS/DIntS

A-Level
AAB including Mathematics and at least one from Chemistry or Physics
IB
35 (6,6,5 HL) including Mathematics and at least one of Chemistry or Physics at HL
BTEC
BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in a relevant subject: DD plus A Level Mathematics at grade B
Relevant subjects include Applied Science, Engineering

H805 Chemical Engineering - BEng (Hons)

A-Level
AAB including Mathematics and at least one from Chemistry or Physics
IB
35 (6,6,5 HL) including Mathematics and at least one of Chemistry or Physics at HL
BTEC
BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in a relevant subject: DD plus A Level Mathematics at grade B
Relevant subjects include Applied Science, Engineering

Selection

Applicants are selected on the basis of their UCAS application. In some cases we may invite applicants for interviews in order to assess academic potential beyond that provided as part of the application. We hope that all applicants would take the opportunity to visit the department, meet staff and students, see facilities and get an insight into what it is like to be a student at Loughborough.

Preferred subjects

The most appropriate entry subjects we look for include Mathematics and two other sciences (such as Physics, Chemistry or Biology). Other subject combinations are also acceptable, but Mathematics and at least one of Chemistry or Physics is a minimum requirement as stated in our typical offers.

Practical Science

Practical Science is required.

Graduate destinations

Most of our graduates are employed by process companies in the oil, gas, water, food and drink, pharmaceutical, plastics and general chemical industries. Many of these companies favour Loughborough as a source of chemical engineers.

In recent years about 70% of those in permanent employment were using their chemical engineering directly and the majority of the rest were employed in financial work.

Companies with whom our students have found employment include:

  • 3M
  • AstraZeneca
  • BP
  • Croda
  • Exxon Mobil
  • Foster Wheeler
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Johnson Matthey
  • Huntsman
  • INEOS
  • Invista
  • Mars
  • Merck
  • Nestlé
  • Pepsico
  • Pfizer
  • Procter and Gamble
  • Schlumberger
  • Shell
  • Tate and Lyle
  • Total
  • United Biscuits

Industrial placements

We send 30% more students on year-long engineering placements than any other UK university (HESA UG Student Record, 2015/16: Engineering & Technology).

This course includes the option of a paid year working in industry. Our close links with industrial partners means we are able to provide our students with considerable help in sourcing and securing their placement.

The year in industry is optional but it is strongly encouraged because of the many benefits it can provide. Placement students earn a salary, typically over £16,500 per annum, (highest year out salary is £28,000) and many are offered a permanent job with their host company when they graduate.

Recent companies who have employed our placement students include:

  • Cadbury
  • EDF Energy
  • E.On
  • Esso Petroleum
  • ExxonMobil
  • GE Water
  • GSK
  • Heinz
  • Jacobs Douwe Egberts
  • PepsiCo
  • Pfizer
  • Procter and Gamble
  • Total
  • Unilever

Ajay: My Placement at Total UK

Loughborough University undergraduate Ajay Parmar talks about his placement opportunity with Paul Mannion of Total UK's Lindsey Oil Refinery.

Study abroad

You can participate in overseas placements such as the Erasmus Scheme and other study exchanges to destinations such as Australia, USA and Europe.

Our students

Ajay

Course

Chemical Engineering with Management

Department

Chemical Engineering

Qualifications

MEng (Hons)

Year of Study

Final

Elizabeth

Course

Chemical Engineering

Department

Chemical Engineering

Qualifications

MEng (Hons)

Year of Study

Final

Emma

Course

Chemical Engineering with DIS

Department

Chemical Engineering

Qualifications

MEng (Hons)

Year of Study

2nd

Natalia

Course

Chemical Engineering

Department

Chemical Engineering

Qualifications

BEng

Year of Study

2nd

Seyitan

Course

Chemical Engineering

Department

Chemical Engineering

Qualifications

BEng (Hons)

Year of Study

Final

Department / School Key Information Sets

MEng (Hons) DIS/DIntS 5 years full-time sandwich

UCAS code: H802

MEng (Hons) 4 years full-time

UCAS code: H803

BEng (Hons) DIS/DIntS 4 years full-time sandwich

UCAS code: H806

BEng (Hons) 3 years full-time

UCAS code: H805