Security, Peace-building and Diplomacy MSc

Entry requirements:
2:2 +
Full-time:
1 year
Part-time:
up to 4 years
Start date:
October 2018
UK/EU fees:
£10,250
International fees:
£19,500
Location:
London

Achievements

36

years of innovation and leadership in diplomatic teaching.

Hosts

Of the 19th and 20th International Symposium

in the Series of Diplomacy in the 21st Century

Overview

Our MSc in Security, Peace-building and Diplomacy explores the link between national and global security and the role of peace-building in developing multi-layered communities and nations.

In our Security, Peace-building and Diplomacy MSc programme you will benefit from specialised, systematic and in-depth study focused on the relationship between diplomacy and international security and peace-building. You will utilise appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with this area, while exploring the relationships between development and peace-building, civil-military relations, cyber security, as well as the wider global security context in which politics, trade and conflict occur.

Security, Peace-building and Diplomacy MSc will provide specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge of the study of and the relationship between diplomacy and international security and peace-building deploying appropriate theories, concepts and methods associated with the specific subject area.

The Academy of Diplomacy and International Governance distinguishes itself as a leader in Diplomatic teaching and research, by responding to the needs of governments, organisations and multi-national corporations. The Academy is renowned for developing graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills required to address complex issues involving modern diplomacy, international security, international business and trade, global communication and information management.

What makes this programme different?

  • Provide specialised, systematic and in-depth knowledge.
  • Study relationship between diplomacy and international security.
  • Study in London

Who should study this programme?

You will want to develop their skills to pursue careers as a trained specialist in diplomacy with particular reference to international security and peace-building.

An honours degree (2:2 or above) or equivalent overseas qualification in a social sciences, humanities or associated subject.

The standard University IELTS English language requirement is 6.5 overall with 6.0 in each individual element (reading, writing, listening and speaking).

What you'll study

You will learn from the most influential thought leaders, pioneering researchers and creative innovators, exposing you to the latest theories and developments from across your discipline.

Modules

You will learn from the most influential thought leaders, pioneering researchers and creative innovators, exposing you to the latest theories and developments from across your discipline.

Compulsory modules

This module will give you an introduction into the Evolution of the international system, Diplomacy and International Relations; The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations; Defining and Implementing Foreign Policy, Diplomatic negotiation and international bargaining; International Diplomacy in the 21st Century.

The aim of this module to introduce you to the concepts and theories underpinning the study of international diplomacy, with particular reference to the dynamics of diplomacy.

Learning Outcomes

  • Critically evaluate the concepts and theories of diplomacy as the exercise of political influence that includes strategies, tactics and techniques
  • Analyse the processes of diplomatic policy-making including alternative models of how policy evolves     
  • Critically evaluate the importance of assessment, advocacy, bargaining and persuasion as dynamic features of the study of diplomacy
  • Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving methods
  • Critically assess concepts and ethics of diplomacy in a professional environment
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomacy
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills
  • Communication and ICT skills
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomacy

Assessment

  • 30% Presentation
  • 70% Critical Report

The aim of this module to introduce you to the context, challenges and skills of diplomatic practice in a rapidly changing international environment.

Learning Outcomes

  • Critically evaluate the context of international political, cultural and economic relations within which diplomacy takes place
  • Analyse the processes of negotiation within international diplomacy
  • Critically evaluate the important of key international events on the practice of diplomacy today
  • Evaluate the appropriateness of differing problem-solving approaches to diplomatic practice
  • Critically assess the impact of ethnic and regional conflicts on the conduct of diplomats
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of diplomacy, including assessments of diplomatic situations
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for informing diplomatic practice
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills
  • Communication and ICT Skills
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to diplomatic practice

Assessment

  • 30% Case study
  • 70% Exam

Frameworks of contemporary peace-building; key approaches and critiques; case studies; The Nature of Peace-building in a Liberal World, what role for diplomacy in peace-building; diplomatic strategies, outcomes and failures.

The module aims to introduce, discuss and contrast orthodox and emancipatory approaches to the building of peace after war, via empirical case studies as a means of testing competing theories that explain the intervention, success and failure of contemporary (post-Cold War) peacebuilding.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Explain the rise of Liberal peacebuilding;
  • Discuss key forces, processes and institutions involved international peacebuilding;
  • Apply systemic theories of intervention in the post-Cold War Era to contemporary phenomena of international peacebuilding;
  • Discern between orthodox and emancipatory peacebuilding;
  • Discuss literature and sources that critically examine the rise and praxis of Liberal peacebuilding; - apply contemporary case studies to a range of theories of peace and conflict studies;
  • Take responsibility for planning and executing tasks within a specific timescale and framework;
  • Show evidence of independent, critical thinking in problem solving and analysis;
  • Engage in debate and present complex ideas and sustained arguments, in a clear and fluent form; - work in an independent and self-reliant manner;
  • Deploy a range of IT skills common in the workplace.

Assessment

  • 100% Coursework

Critical evaluation of the changing landscape of international security; theories and approaches to the study of international security; emerging trends in contemporary issues and practices; examination and assessment of past and evolving cases of inter-state as well as intra-state security issues.

The aim of this module is to examine international security through a variety of traditional and non-traditional frames of reference. The overarching aim of the module is to provide students with a wider understanding of the security context in which politics, trade and conflict occur.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Evaluate various approaches to the study of international security;
  • Evaluate the causes of international insecurity;
  • Assess the utility of 'securitizing' policy issues, and the impact of securitization on public policy responses; - Evaluate the role and behaviours of international organisations and states in the international system;
  • Construct reasoned argument that synthesizes and analyses the merits of competing disciplinary, conceptual and theoretical perspectives outlined in the course of the module;
  • Recognise established and emergent phenomena in international security and in crises that impact on the international system;
  • Critically debate established and emergent security phenomena and crises;
  • Apply - in a written submission - a strong understanding of key security concepts, and theories which contribute to the analysis of crises;
  • Present critiques of empirically grounded case study materials;
  • Reflect on their own learning and make use of constructive feedback;
  • Gather and organise evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and primary sources;
  • Work in small groups;
  • Translate scholarship into practice.

Assessment

  • 40% Policy Brief
  • 60% Coursework

With a multi-talented group of students you will work on a brief from a real company looking to solve a real social or business problem.

Together with your student team, you will research and build solutions to a business problem, supported by our project tutors, clients and staff. Previous clients include Foster + Partners, Speedo, The London Legacy Development Corporation as well as many other companies, start-ups and charities.

The Collaborative Project provides a means for you to engage in critical enquiry and to be exposed to project-based teamwork in multicultural and interdisciplinary settings. By undertaking this module, you will strengthen your cooperative and collaborative working skills and competencies, whilst raising your awareness and appreciation of cultural and disciplinary diversity and differences.

The Collaborative Project aims to provide you with a hands-on experience of identifying, framing and resolving practice-oriented and real-world based challenges and problems, using creativity and appropriate tools to achieve valuable and relevant solutions. Alongside the collaborative elements of the module, you will be provided with opportunities to network with stakeholders, organisations and corporations, which will give you the experience and skills needed to connect to relevant parties and potentially develop future employment opportunities.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module, you will be able to:

  • Work effectively in diverse and interdisciplinary teams;
  • Undertake and contribute towards a project-based development process;
  • Apply critical enquiry, reflection, and creative methods to identify, frame, and resolve issues and problems at hand;
  • Identify user and stakeholder needs and value creation opportunities, whilst collecting and applying evidence-based information and knowledge to develop appropriate insights, practices and solutions;
  • Identify, structure, reflect on key issues and propose solutions to problems in creative ways;
  • Enhance your appreciation for diversity and divergent individual and disciplinary perspectives;
  • Be able to provide structured, reflective and critical feedback to peers and other stakeholders;
  • Plan and execute a project plan including scope, resources and timing;
  • Effectively communicate ideas, methods and results to a diverse range of stakeholders;
  • Use multiple, state-of-the-art date media and technologies to communicate with collaborators;
  • Make informed, critical and reflective decisions in time-limited situations.

Assessment

100% Coursework consisting of:

  • 20% Group project proposal
  • 20% Individual reflection
  • 30% Final Project Report
  • 30% Project deliverables to the client

The Dissertation module will equip you with the relevant skills, knowledge and understanding to embark on your own research project. You will have the choice of three dissertation pathways:

  • A desk based research project that could be set by an organisation or could be a subject of the your choice
  • A project that involves collection of primary data from within an organisation or based on lab and/or field experiments
  • An Internship within an organisation during which time you will complete a project as part of their role in agreement with the organisation (subject to a suitable placement position being obtained)

By undertaking a dissertation at master's level, you will achieve a high level of understanding in your chosen subject area and will produce a written thesis or project report which will discuss your research in more detail.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this module, you should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

  • The importance of project planning;
  • The importance of a clear hypothesis or research question;
  • The ethical implications of research;
  • The relevant empirical data and methodologies for data collection or knowledge assimilation for the subject area;
  • Methods of data analysis and their suitability for the intended data;
  • The areas of expertise or publications of the major individuals or organisations in the subject or business area;
  • The previous research or current knowledge in the specific subject or business area;
  • Theoretical perspectives relevant to your chosen topic;
  • The most effective methods of presentation for data or knowledge;
  • Developing a clear, coherent and original research question, hypothesis or business problem in a suitable subject area;
  • Synthesising relevant sources (e.g. research literature, primary data) to construct a coherent argument in response to your research question, hypothesis or business problem;
  • Analysing primary or secondary data collected by an appropriate method;
  • Critically evaluating data collected in context with previously published knowledge or information;
  • Engaging in critical debate and argumentation in written work;
  • Applying principles of good scholarly practice to your written work;
  • Performing appropriate literature searching/business information searching using library databases or other reputable sources;
  • Planning a research project and producing a realistic gantt chart demonstrating your intended timelines;
  • Synthesising information from appropriate sources;
  • Demonstrating rational use of research method tools;
  • Selecting and using appropriate investigative and research skills;
  • Demonstrating effective project planning skills;
  • Finding and evaluating scholarly sources;
  • Engaging in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Demonstrating effective report writing skills;
  • Recognising and using resources effectively;
  • Successfully managing a project from idea to completion;
  • Demonstrating commercial awareness or the impact of knowledge transfer in a business or research environment.

Assessment

100% Coursework consisting of:

  • 20% Literature review
  • 20% Research proposal
  • 60% Dissertation report/essay

Optional modules

The aim of this module is for students to understand the institutions and decision-making procedures of the European Union (EU) as well as key policy domains that are of particular interest to diplomacy and diplomatic perspectives.

Learning outcomes

On completion of this module, you should be able to:

  • Situate the analysis of European Integration and the European Union (EU);
  • Identify and deploy the key concepts, theories and terminology of European Integration;
  • Identify and evaluate key institutions and decision-making procedures of the European Union (EU);
  • Apply this knowledge to selected policy fields.
  • Locate studies of European Integration and the European Union (EU) from primary and secondary
  • sources;
  • Identify the main approaches to the study of European Integration and the European Union (EU);
  • Critically assess the practical workings of the European Union (EU);
  • Employ critical judgement in relation to case studies of selected EU policy areas;
  • Locate and appropriate evidence base in a critical report.
  • Reflect on their own learning and use constructive feedback from the module tutor, and peers.

Assessment

  • 100% coursework

The aim of this module to assess the validity of economic factors in international affairs and to understand the development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the role of economic factors in international affairs;
  • Analyse the development and dynamics of the global economy and global governance;
  • Critically demonstrate awareness of the workings of global governance today;
  • Critically assess concepts and practice of global governance ;
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the study of the global economy and global governance; - formulate research questions and research strategies for studying global governance;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT Skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of global economic governance.

Assessment

  • 40% Critical Report
  • 60% Presentation

Definitions of Economic Diplomacy, approaches to free trade and international trade, investment climates and the role of attracting foreign direct investments (FDI), Governmental economic policy instruments, soft and civilian power, the role of sanctions, the emergence of international economic institutions, the role of multinational corporations, Economic diplomacy of governments and governing diplomacy with multinational corporations and international institutions.

The aim of this module is to introduce you to key concepts and the practice of Economic Diplomacy.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the main theoretical and analytical perspectives of Economic Diplomacy with the field of international relations;
  • Analyse the linkages between theoretical perspectives and their application to practical case studies of: Economic Diplomacy; - critically evaluate the contemporary challenges of Economic Diplomacy - critically evaluate theories and conceptual approaches appropriate to the study of Economic Diplomacy;
  • critically apply theories and concepts to case studies of Economic Diplomacy;
  • Identify case studies of Economic Diplomacy;
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying Economic Diplomacy;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT Skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of Economic Diplomacy.

Assessment

  • 30% Presentation
  • 70% Critical Report

The modules includes: speech art theory; critical discourse analysis; diplomatic drafting framing/reframing; handling/withholding information; explicit/implicit language, genres and registers, creative ambiguity and speech writing/analysis.

The aim of this module to introduce you to the theoretical approaches to the study of language and to develop competence in effective diplomatic discourse and communication.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate verbal and written diplomatic texts, norms and conventions;
  • Analyse diplomatic discourses and diplomatic speech/speech-writing;
  • Critically demonstrate awareness of language choices in diplomatic exchanges and dialogue;
  • Critically assess diplomatic texts, argumentation and persuasion;
  • Identify appropriate sources of diplomatic language, speech and speech-writing and information handling; - formulate research questions and research strategies for studying diplomatic discourse;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT Skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of diplomatic discourse and communication.

Assessment

  • 100% Coursework consisting of;
  • 40% Critical Report
  • 60% Presentation

Culture as identity and communication in a globalised and globalising world;, Verbal and non-verbal factors in cultural projection and perception; The Relevance of cultural and intercultural awareness to negotiation and conflict resolution; The cultural environment of global business; Encoding and decoding messages in multicultural negotiations and work teams; Overcoming phobias, barriers and culture shock; Dialogue, mutual respect and benefits.

The aim of this module is to provide a thorough understanding of the concepts and importance of intercultural communication, cultural diplomacy, reputation management, image and cultural projection and perception, especially in relation to diplomatic activity.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the main concepts of intercultural communication;
  • Analyse the existing and potential utility of intercultural communication in appropriate situations in diverse and multicultural settings;
  • Critically evaluate intercultural communication strategies and outcomes;
  • Critically apply conceptual knowledge to actual situations that require accurate assessment of intercultural interchanges;
  • Identify appropriate sources pertaining to the development of concepts and theories of intercultural communication;
  • Formulate research questions and research strategies for studying intercultural communication;
  • Demonstrate excellent oral communication skills;
  • Apply scholarship to communicate research findings to practitioner audience;
  • Demonstrate research management and self-learning skills;
  • Communication and ICT skills;
  • Manage research, resource materials, data and referencing, and research findings relating to the study of intercultural communication.

Assessment

  • 40% Critical Report
  • 60% Presentation

Second subject modules

The module will include: visualization, using imagery to envision possible future conditions; journey mapping, assessing the existing experience through the customer's eyes, using customer oriented data collection techniques; value chain analysis, assessing the current value chain that supports the customer's journey; mind mapping, generating insights from exploration activities and using those to create; design criteria; brainstorming, generating ideas; rapid concept development, assembling innovative elements into a coherent proposition that can be explored and evaluated; rapid ‘prototyping', expressing a new concept in a tangible form for exploration, consumer testing, and refinement; consumer testing; and storytelling.

The aim of this module is to enhance student's ability to use design approaches and tools for identifying and implementing human centred innovation opportunities. You are expected to deploy knowledge learned in this module into parallel running Collaborative Project module.

Learning Outcomes

The module will introduce students to a systematic design-based approach aimed at identifying and implementing user centered innovation opportunities.

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Identify when and how to use range of Design Thinking tools;
  • Select appropriate tools to inform project development;
  • Appropriate use of the Design Thinking tools in a parallel module;
  • Develop communication skills in diverse teams;
  • Developed a systematic approach to tackle complex projects;
  • Apply tools in a project context;
  • Work with variety of stakeholders;
  • Understand how to tackle `wicked' problems;
  • Be able to deliver a succinct presentation to communicate key facts.

Assessment

  • 10% Presentation
  • 20% Peer Feedback
  • 70% Report

The theory of entrepreneurship and the importance of entrepreneurial action to the innovation process; the contemporary business environment; micro and macro environments; intellectual property; funding & finance; project management; corporate responsibility & sustainability; governance; ethics; business planning; strategy; risk analysis and failure.

The aim of this module is to equip you with an in depth knowledge of the innovation process, its importance to the economy and an understanding of all of the various factors affecting its success including intellectual property, funding and strategy. We will introduce the academic theories of entrepreneurship and analyse the personality traits and behaviours associated with entrepreneurs.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Innovation as a process;
  • Identify the academic theories of entrepreneurship;
  • Identify the factors influencing the success of organisations;
  • Relate innovation theory to the performance of organisations;
  • Use investigative and research skills;
  • Demonstrate effective report writing skills.
  • Demonstrate commercial awareness.

Assessment

  • 100% Coursework consisting of:
  • 50% Report 1
  • 50% Report 2

This module will include: the main themes that underpin media and marketing, the evolution of media and marketing in a sport context, the practices and techniques for effective sport media and marketing, the types of media and marketing, and consumer and fan engagement.

The aims of this module are to be introduced to key concepts in sport media and marketing and to develop understanding of the nature of sport media and marketing.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Assess the major theories, principles, and concepts surrounding sport media and marketing;
  • Apply techniques and practices involved in conceptualising and developing a marketing plan;
  • Gather, analyse, and present sport media and marketing ideas and concepts;
  • Apply sport media and marketing principles that can be utilised in different sport environments;
  • Demonstrate initiative and personal responsibility;
  • Continue to learn independently and to develop professionally.

Assessment

  • 40% Sponsorship Pitch
  • 60% Marketing Plan

The module content will include: defining media and creative industries; ownership, concentration and control in media and creative industries; innovation and technological change; media and creative markets; business models in media and creative industries; copyright; global media cities; clustering of media and creative industries; media and cultural policy.

The aim of this module is to introduce students to key critical debates relating to the economics of media and creative industries and their social, cultural and political implications.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this module you should be able to:

  • Understand how and why the media and creative industries have been defined;
  • Understand the importance of industrial structure in media and creative industries;
  • Understand the implications of innovation and technological change for media and creative industries;
  • Understand changing business models in media and creative industries;
  • Understand the importance of copyright and how this is affected by technological change;
  • Understand why media and creative industries cluster in particular spaces and cities;
  • Understand the globalisation of media and creative industries;
  • Understand media and cultural policy.
  • Identify, debate and evaluate relevant critical perspectives on media and creative industries;
  • Systematically assess the implicit theoretical assumptions of contrasting perspectives;
  • Use critical perspectives to analyse emerging trends in media and creative industries;
  • Communicate effectively in speech and writing, with academic and non-academic audiences;
  • Engage in critical reasoning, debate and argumentation;
  • Assess the empirical validity of competing perspectives;
  • Manage time and resources effectively;
  • Synthesise different sources of data and identify key arguments and issues at stake in particular fields of practice;
  • Understand the behaviour of firms in media and creative industries;
  • Understand emerging trends in media and creative industries;
  • Apply skills in written and verbal communication that are relevant to this field;
  • Be able to plan, organise and manage coursework assignments, demonstrating independence, initiative and originality.

Assessment

  • 100% Coursework

You will receive a thorough introduction to the latest mobile Internet and communication technologies, including their network architectures and radio interface protocols covering 3GPP LTE mobile broadband radio access, network architecture, radio interface architecture, scheduling algorithms for multimedia delivery, other wireless communications technologies (such as WLANs), and an brief overview of the future 5G mobile communications.

The module also includes a brief overview of cloud technology and covers media cloud applications and challenges, such as energy efficiency in cloud systems, mobile cloud computing and cloud multimedia delivery technologies. Privacy and security issues in mobile media cloud services are also covered.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the module, you should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of mobile internet and cloud technologies with specific knowledge of media cloud applications on mobile devices, systems and Internet in general, and the challenges that are associated with making such applications available to the end-users via the mobile Internet and cloud technology
  • Review mobile Internet technology, media cloud applications, and the strengths and associated challenges by utilising mobile cloud technology and applications
  • Describe privacy and security issues in mobile cloud services
  • Interpret and utilise mobile Internet and cloud business models
  • Demonstrate an understanding of mobile Internet architecture and access techniques, system performance and limitation
  • Apply specific skills in media cloud applications
  • Show an understanding of how the combination of mobile Internet with cloud computing technology is impacting on the future of media applications
  • Apply knowledge of mobile Internet and media cloud technology to media service delivery and the communication industry
  • Able to tackle media cloud application and mobile communication networks related problems and deal with their possible solutions
  • Equip themselves with the necessary understanding and essential knowledge that are required for service provider jobs in the cloud computing, applications, and mobile services provision domains

Assessment

  • 30% report
  • 70% exam

How you'll study

Seminars
Lectures
Tutorials
Independent study
Group work

Your personal and professional development

Loughborough University London prides itself on the high calibre of graduates it produces, and provides great opportunities for you to develop the skills and attributes you need to progress successfully in your chosen career.

Future career prospects

Our Security, Peace- Building and Diplomacy programme will equip you with the skills to pursue a career as a trained specialist in diplomacy, with particular reference to international security and peace-building.

You will also have the opportunity to enhance your knowledge and career prospects further by undertaking an MPhil or PhD programme.

Your personal development

The Academy offers high-quality masters programmes taught by outstanding teaching staff and professionals that are well connected within their field. You will benefit from the guidance and tuition of an academic team with an unrivalled track record in the teaching of Diplomacy and other related disciplines. You will receive training and support to develop a professional diplomatic career, or enter a regional, international and multinational organisation or governing body.

Fees and funding

UK/EU:
£10,250
International:
£19,500

Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, IT equipment and other support services. University fees and charges can be paid in advance and there are several methods of payment, including online payments and payment by instalment. Special arrangements are made for payments by part-time students.

Our academics

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