Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
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Loughborough University

Programme Specifications

Programme Specification

BSc (Hons) Chemistry and Sports Science

Academic Year: 2013/14

This specification provides a concise summary of the main features of the programme and the learning outcomes that a typical student might reasonably be expected to achieve and demonstrate if full advantage is taken of the learning opportunities that are provided.

This specification applies to delivery of the programme in the Academic Year indicated above. Prospective students reviewing this information for a later year of study should be aware that these details are subject to change as outlined in our Terms and Conditions of Study.

This specification should be read in conjunction with:

  • Summary
  • Aims
  • Learning outcomes
  • Structure
  • Progression & weighting

Programme summary

Awarding body/institution Loughborough University
Teaching institution (if different)
Owning school/department Department of Chemistry
Details of accreditation by a professional/statutory body
Final award See Programme Structure
Programme title Chemistry and Sports Science (CSS)
Programme code CMUB14 Chemistry and Sports Science (CSS) BSc
Length of programme
UCAS code BSc: FC16
BSc with DPS/DIntS/DIS: FCC6
Admissions criteria

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/departments/chemistry/undergraduate/courses/

Date at which the programme specification was published Wed, 04 Dec 2013 09:22:04 GMT

1. Programme Aims

Aims

CSS

To inspire students to have interest and enthusiasm for chemistry, an appreciation of its application in different contexts and to involve them in an intellectually stimulating and satisfying experience of learning and studying.

X

To provide students with a balanced foundation of chemical knowledge and practical skills through study of modules identified as core chemistry.

X

To develop the ability of students to apply their chemical knowledge and skills to the solution of theoretical and practical chemical problems.

X

To develop knowledge, understanding and skills in core sport sciences.

X

To provide students with selected specialised areas of study so that they can experience the frontiers of research in sports science.

X

To provide students with a knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to further studies in specialised areas of chemistry or multi-disciplinary areas involving chemistry.

X

To provide training, through a range of educational activities, to develop a range of transferable skills applicable to employment.

X

2. Relevant subject benchmark statements and other external and internal reference points used to inform programme outcomes:

  • The Benchmark Statement for Chemistry.
  • The Framework for Higher Education Qualifications.
  • University Learning and Teaching Strategy.
  • Teaching and learning policies of the Department of Chemistry and the School of Sport Exercise Sciences.
  • The research interests and specialisms of the teaching staff and their professional involvement in their disciplines.

3. Programme Learning Outcomes

3.1 Knowledge and Understanding

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:

CSS

K1

The major aspects of chemical terminology, nomenclature, conventions and units.

X

K2

The major types of chemical reaction and the main characteristics associated with them.

X

K3

The principles and procedures used in chemical analysis and the characterisation of chemical compounds.

X

K4

The characteristics of the different states of matter and the theories used to describe them.

X

K5

The principles of quantum mechanics and aspects of theoretical chemistry and their application to the description of the structure and properties of atoms and molecules.

X

K6

The principles of thermodynamics and their application to chemistry.

X

K7

The principles of chemical reaction kinetics, including catalysis and the mechanistic interpretation of organic and inorganic chemical reactions.

X

K8

The systemic chemistry of the elements and their compounds, including group relationships and trends within the Periodic Table.

X

K9

The properties of aliphatic, aromatic, heterocyclic and organometallic compounds.

X

K10

The nature, nomenclature and behaviour of functional groups in organic molecules.

X

K11

Major synthetic pathways in organic chemistry.

X

K12

The properties, nature, behaviour and handling of radioactive compounds and their handling.

X

K13

Core sports science from both a theoretical and practical perspective.

X

K14

Tactical/strategical factors involved in sport.

X

K15

Techniques required for a range of sports.

X

K16

Specialist areas in sports science chosen from a wide range of optional modules in, for example, biomechanics, physiology and psychology.

X

3.2 Skills and other attributes

a. Subject-specific cognitive skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

CSS

C1

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of essential facts, concepts, principles and theories relating to the subject areas listed in 3.

X

C2

Apply such knowledge and understanding to the solution of qualitative and quantitative problems of a familiar and unfamiliar nature.

X

C3

Recognise and analyse novel problems and plan strategies for their solution.

X

C4

Evaluate, interpret and collate chemical information and data.

X

C5

Recognise and implement good measurement science and practice.

X

C6

Present scientific material and arguments orally and writing, clearly and correctly, to a range of audiences.

X

C7

Use information technology, computational and data processing skills for the analysis and presentation of chemical information and data.

X

b. Subject-specific practical skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

CSS

P1

Handle chemical materials safely by taking into account their physical and chemical properties, including any specific hazards associated with their use.

X

P2

Conduct standard laboratory procedures for the synthesis and analysis of organic and inorganic systems.

X

P3

Monitor record and document in a reliable manner, chemical properties, events and changes by observation and measurement.

X

P5

Operate standard chemical instrumentation for separation and spectroscopic structural investigation and interpret spectral and analytical results from a wider range of techniques.

X

P6

Interpret data from laboratory investigations (observation, measurement) in terms of their significance and underlying theory.

X

P7

Analyse skills and techniques in sport.

X

P8

Demonstrate practical skills relevant to a range of core sports.

X

c. Key transferable skills:

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

CSS

T1

Communicate effectively orally and in writing.

X

T2

Demonstrate problem-solving skills relating to qualitative and quantitative information, extending to situations where evaluations have been made on the basis of limited information.

X

T3

Demonstrate numeracy and computational skills including error analysis, order of magnitude estimations, correct use of units and modes of data presentation.

X

T4

Demonstrate retrieval skills for directly taught and independently acquired information, and for primary as well as secondary information sources.

X

T5

Use information and technology skills such as use of spreadsheets and word-processors, presentation packages and internet use.

X

T6

Show interpersonal skills associated to interaction with others one-to-one as well as team-working in small and large groups.

X

T7

Demonstrate time management and organisational skills to plan and implement efficient and effective modes of working.

X

T8

Demonstrate study skills for continuing professional development.

X

4. Programme structure

Final Award:

BSc (Honours). 

DPS (Diploma in Professional Studies) – additional award available on all programmes if a professional training in industry year is taken. 

DIntS (Diploma in International Studies) – additional award available on all programmes if a study abroad year with a partner University is taken. 

DIS – (Diploma in Industrial Studies) - additional award available on all programmes if a placement year is taken.

 

Programme Structure:

4.1 Part A

In this table X indicates a compulsory module and o indicates an optional module

Code

Title

Weight

Semester

CSS

CMA002

Structure and Reactivity in Inorganic Chemistry

20

1&2

X

PSA001

Teaching and Coaching 1

20

1&2

X

CMA008

Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics

20

1&2

X

MAA109

Mathematics for Chemistry

10

1

X

PSA020

Exercise Physiology

10

1

X

PSA028

Biomechanics of Sport

10

1

X

PSA002

Fitness and Training

10

2

X

PSA026

Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology

10

2

X

CMA007

Concepts in Main Group Chemistry

10

2

X

4.2 Part B

In this table X indicates a compulsory module and o indicates an optional module

Code

Title

Weight

Semester

CSS

CMA006

Structure and Reactivity in Organic Chemistry

20

1&2

X

PSB211

Exercise Physiology 2

20

1&2

o

CMA003

Spectroscopy and the Structure of the Universe

10

1

X

CMB007

Advanced Kinetics and Quantum Mechanics

10

1

X

PSB027

Acquiring Movement Skills

10

1

o

PSB029

Biomechanics of Sports Movements

10

1

o

PSB031

Psychological Issues and Strategies in Sport

10

1

o

CMA009

Molecular Basis of Life

10

2

X

CMA011

Introduction to Analytical Chemistry

10

2

X

PSB002

Structural Kinesiology

10

2

o

PSB026

Psycho-Social Factors in Competitive Sport

20

2

o

PSB028

Methods of Analysis in Sports Biomechanics

10

2

o


Provided compulsory modules are studied, candidates may opt to take 20, 30 or 40 credits of Sports Science modules in any one semester. The total modular weight for Sports Science modules must be 60 credits for semesters one and two combined.

It is recommended that you select  at least one module from each of these three core areas:

Biomechanics

Physiology

Psychology

Biomechanics of sports movements

Exercise physiology 2

Psycho-Social factors in competitive sport

Methods of analysis in sports biomechanics

 

 

Psychological issues and strategies in sport

The remaining modules listed above are still optional, but should be considered once a selection from each of the three core areas has been made.

4.3 Part I

Candidates may undertake a programme of industrial training leading to the award of the Diploma in Industrial Studies, a programme of professional training leading to the Diploma of Professional Studies, or an approved period of study abroad leading to a Diploma in International Studies, which normally occurs between Part B and Part C. 

4.4 Part C

In the tables below X indicates a compulsory module and o indicates an optional module

Code

Title

Credit Weight

Semester

CSS

CMB001

Synthesis of Organic Molecules

20

1&2

X

CMB004

d-Block Chemistry

10

1

X

CMB015

Analytical Separation Methods

10

1

X

PSC021

Physiology of Exercise and Health

20

1

o

PSC022

Sport and Exercise Medicine

10

1

o

PSC031

Applied Sport and Performance Psychology

20

1

o

CMB006

p-Block Ligands, Cages and Clusters

10

2

X

CMB010

Atomic Spectrometric Analysis

10

2

X

PSC019

Applied Physiology of Sports Performance

10

2

o

PSC020

Sport Nutrition

10

2

o

PSC026

Exercise Psychology

20

2

o

PSC027

Motor Control of Sports Movement

10

2

o

PSC028

Advanced Methods of Analysis in Sports Biomechanics

10

1

o

PSC029

Mechanics of Sports Techniques

10

2

o

Provided compulsory modules are studied, candidates may opt to take 20, 30 or 40 credits of Sports Science modules in any one semester. The total modular weight for Sports Science modules must be 60 credits for semesters one and two combined.

It is recommended that you select at least one module from each of these three core areas:Provided compulsory modules are studied, candidates may opt to take 20, 30 or 40 credits of Sports Science modules in any one semester. The total modular weight for Sports Science modules must be 60 credits for semesters one and two combined.

Biomechanics

Physiology

Psychology

Mechanics of sports techniques

Physiology of exercise & health

Exercise psychology

Advanced methods of analysis

Sport & Exercise Medicine

Psychology of sporting excellence

 

Sport Nutrition

 

 

Applied physiology of sport performance

 

The remaining modules are still optional, but should be considered once a selection from each of the three core areas has been made.

5. Criteria for Progression and Degree Award

Candidates must achieve the minimum credit requirements set out in Regulation XX in order to progress through the programme and qualify for the award of the degree.

In addition, in order to gain credit for a Chemistry module which contains a coursework/laboratory component, candidates must obtain at least 40% in the coursework/laboratory component of that module.

6. Relative Weighting of Parts of the Programme for the Purposes of Final Degree Classification

Candidates' final degree classification will be determined on the basis of their performance in degree level Module Assessments in Parts B and C in accordance with the scheme set out in Regulation XX. The scores for each Part will be combined in the ratio Part B 40: Part C 60 to determine the final score.

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