Centre for Academic Practice

Technology Enhanced Learning

Tools for Teaching

This Tools for Teaching page holds a list of E-learning tools and systems used here at Loughborough. Associated resources and contact information for each of the tools and systems as well as the pedagogic rationale for their use is also given.  

What's New 2016 / 17

Staff hub on Learn

A new staff hub module has been created in Learn to bring together information on supporting and enhancing learning and teaching practice. It includes information on how to use Learn, assessment and feedback, teaching delivery, curriculum design, supporting students and details of who to contact for further support.

The module can be found here: http://learn.lboro.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=11512 

Turnitin and GradeMark

Turnitin Feedback Studio - Turnitin has released a major product upgrade that will soon be available at Loughborough University. The new version of the service, called Turnitin Feedback Studio, offers all the functionalities of Turnitin, but with a simplified, more intuitive interface. Turnitin Feedback Studio will make it faster and easier than ever to promote academic integrity, provide actionable feedback, and evaluate student learning here at Loughborough. To find out more about the the timescales and potential benefits, see the full announcement at http://learn.lboro.ac.uk/mod/forum/discuss.php?d=127240.

If you have a query regarding Turnitin, you can contact Lee Barnett (TurnItIn administrator) for advice and guidance.

Tools:

ReVIEW Lecture Capture

What is it?

ReVIEW is Loughborough University’s lecture capture system. It allows you to record a teaching session, and make the recording available for students to view online through the LEARN platform.

ReVIEW allows for the simultaneous capture of audio, video and any computer application (including Microsoft PowerPoint) although by default, the recording includes only what is shown on the projector screen, and your voice. During a ReVIEW session, you have the option to pause the recording at any time if content is being explored which is not suitable to be captured. You also have the option to edit the video after the session, before the recording is made available to students.

What are the advantages?

  • It is clear that, across the sector, students are coming to expect lectures to be captured as routine practice, in much the same way that online support for most modules became routine a decade ago. This is likely to be accelerated by rising tuition fees. 
  • There is very positive feedback from students where it has been used, and in particular where it has been used strategically to support programmes rather than just individual modules, such as in History; Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering and Materials
  • There is no evidence of any impact on attendance
  • The learning curve for new users is relatively shallow
  • The process of capturing and publishing can be almost completely automated, with a new plug-in for Learn/Moodle automatically displaying any new captures associated with a specific module
  • All installations support simultaneous capture and live streaming of sessions

What are the challenges?

  • In terms of progressing from sporadic use to a position where lecture capture is the norm or default, a major cultural change will be required

What are the potential uses?

Captured lectures are, or might be, of benefit to:

  • Distance learners
  • Students with additional needs
  • Students whose first language is not English
  • Students who, with increasing tuition fees, are obliged to take on part-time jobs and are unable to attend every lecture in person
  • Postgraduate students already in employment
  • Students on modules that have in the past proven to be particularly challenging
  • All students at revision time
  • Students on modules where the lecturer is a non-native speaker of English
  • Academics wishing to rethink how they use contact time more efficiently and effectively
  • Academics wishing to reuse specific lectures from other another module/programme/School as preparatory/supplementary material
  • Reducing the current massively inefficient duplication of effort in the teaching of research methods
  • Reducing the disruption caused by a pandemic or other event affecting life on campus
  • Facilitating peer observation

Where is it available?

ReVIEW lecture capture is available in all pool space across campus with further installs supported in non-pool space. 

Who can I talk to about this?

All enquiries should be addressed to review@lboro.ac.uk

A lecture capture literature review completed in September 2015 can be found here:  Lecture Capture Literature Review.

Turnitin

What is it?‌

Turnitin is a web-based tool which allows users to check their text against a wide range of web sources.  It does NOT detect plagiarism – it simply matches text, so if it has been correctly cited, matching text is not plagiarised.  Nevertheless it is quick and simple to use and is valuable as a primary filter.

The use of Turnitin has an established deterrent effect, but should be part of an awareness campaign to which all starting students are exposed, so that they adopt acceptable academic practices early on in their career.

What are the advantages?

  • Turnitin is integrated with Learn/Moodle
  • Coursework is checked against a huge database of sources
  • Students submit their coursework directly through Learn to Turnitin (ie without tutor intervention), which enforces deadlines
  • Originality Report lists sources
  • Cases of Academic Misconduct brought to Registry require a Turnitin Originality Report as supporting evidence

What are the challenges?

  • Tutors need to set up the assignment within the module for every year that the module runs
  • Turnitin does not pick up everything that has been copied (but it’s better than Google etc.)
  • When Turnitin finds the first match for a piece of text, it moves through to the next piece of text.  The match may not be the actual source that was copied
  • Checking an essay usually takes 45 minutes or so, but at busy times of year, it can be best to leave it overnight
  • If several students have colluded on an assignment, it may not pick up all of the culprits unless the coursework is re-scanned

See Also:

Read a case study in which Dr Gregory James (SBE) describes how he uses Turnitin formatively.

Who can I talk to about this?

All members of the E-learning Team are conversant with Turnitin, but Lee Barnett is the primary contact.

GradeMark

What is it?

GradeMark is the online marking tool that comes with the Turnitin suite.  Any document which has been submitted to Turnitin’s Originality Checking via the Turnitin Assignment activity on Learn can be marked using GradeMark.  Students can access the marked-up coursework and marks are automatically stored on Learn.

Tutors can define Frequently Used Comments and deploy them quickly and repeatedly, leaving more time for the reflective summative commentary.

It is also possible to define a rubric (or marking grid) for criteria-based marking to ensure consistency where an assignment has multiple markers.

Online marking isn’t for everybody, but where has been used it has been shown to increase student satisfaction with the feedback they receive.

What are the advantages?

  • Marking is paperless and comments are typed, which helps legibility
  • Students will have already submitted their coursework to Turnitin, and the Originality Report is available alongside the marking tools
  • Tutors can build up banks of frequently used comments as they go along, and re-use them later
  • Marginal comments can be placed anywhere on the document, even over illustrations and photos
  • Rubrics make the marking criteria explicit, making feedback more incisive

What are the challenges?

  • Tutor is marking on a computer which needs an internet connection
  • Any tutor on the module can mark any piece of coursework, but marking isn’t blind and double-marking is awkward to organise since there is no paper copy
  • Although re-usable setting up comment banks and criterion-based marking rubrics takes time
  • Where a group of students collaborate in the production of a joint report, it must be in the name of one student only

See Also:

GradeMark Tutor Manual

Who can I talk to about this?

All members of the e-Learning Team are conversant with TurnItIn, but Lee Barnett is the primary contact for the software.

Questionmark Perception (QMP)

What is it?

Questionmark Perception (QMP) is a tool which allows you to create objective questions including but not limited to multiple choice questions and deliver them anytime, anywhere via a web browser. This system runs independently to Learn, but any tests you create for your module can be accessed directly from the modules page on Learn. It is ideal for modules with relatively static material and assessing large groups/numbers of students.

What are the advantages?

  • Flexible/robust authoring environment – more feature rich than Moodle Quiz
  • Academics control the whole process of administering a test from the creation of questions to the scheduling of tests
  • Promotes collaborative working through sharing of question/assessment folders
  • Sophisticated question types that can include images, video, audio, drag and drop etc.
  • Instant feedback to participants at item, topic and/or assessment levels – great for diagnostic testing
  • Adaptive assessment branching based on how questions are answered
  • Extensive reporting capabilities, including detailed item analysis
  • Secure test-taking environment through the use of QM Secure

What are the challenges?

  • Scheduling is carried out outside of the VLE (although this may change)
  • Results are stored outside of the VLE
  • Authoring software limited to Windows platform
  • If tests are delivered via QM Secure then test-taking is restricted to Internet Explorer

What are the potential uses?

  • Diagnostic tests at the start of term, or periodically over the semester to gauge the ability of the students and identify problematic areas/topics
  • Summative tests which contribute towards modules marks. For example, four tests contributing 25% of the module marks

Who can I talk to about this?

All members of the E-learning Team are conversant with QMP, but Lee Barnett or Timothy Baseley (IT Services) are the primary contacts.

Camtasia

What is it?

TechSmith Camtasia Studio is a piece of software which enables you to:

  • Record your onscreen activity, including your mouse movements and typing, whilst recording the audio from both your microphone and your computer. In addition you can capture images from your webcam images (or other video recording devices attached to your PC)
  • Edit your recordings to create a professional video. You can zoom in and highlight screen elements; insert images and text to enrich the content; collate recordings and videos and clip and reorder as required; insert interactive elements such as buttons, quizzes etc.
  • Share your video in different formats for different locations such as Learn. You can also adjust the production settings to style your video and it’s controls, including adding a table of contents

What are the advantages?

  • Create a recording of a process which allows your students to view and review at their own pace
  • You are in control of when and where you record, whether you make them whilst you teach, or in your own time
  • Ability to enhance your recordings as much as you want to
  • May free up your student contact time to include different learning activities

What are the challenges?

  • There is a learning curve to be able to use the software, to record, edit and produce
  • Time is required to produce recordings, unlike the ReVIEW system which is more automated

What are the potential uses?

  • Capturing on screen activity to create support material, prior, during and/or post lectures
  • Record PowerPoint presentations including audio for students to review and revisit
  • Flip your classroom activity by creating instructional material for review outside of the classroom and use your face-to-face time for deeper learning
  • Software demonstrations
  • Create distance learning resources
  • Creating audio and visual feedback for students
  • Creating advertising material for your subject or department

How about students producing screencasts?

  • Recording their interaction with software
  • As part of their coursework

Similar tools you may be interested in…

  • Lecture capture; Personal Capture version.
  • Hand-held recording devices; Pocket camcorders.
  • Recording what you write; Smartpens.

Who can I talk to about this?

Contact your School E-learning Officer for more information, primary contacts within the e-learning team are Matt Hope and Lee Barnett.
You may also wish to consider attending one of our staff development courses on using Camtasia.

WebPA

What is it?

WebPA is an online peer assessment system, or more specifically, a peer-moderated marking system. It is designed for teams of students doing group-work, the outcome of which earns an overall group mark. Each student in a group grades their team-mates (and their own) performance, which is then used with the overall group mark to provide each student with an individual grade, reflecting their contribution to the group.

What are the advantages?

  • Academics save time and reduce their workload
  • Academics are able to assess hard to measure outcomes such as group working and leadership
  • Students have an opportunity to reflect upon the group work process
  • Students develop a better understanding of the assessment process and criteria
  • It can have a positive influence on student behaviour
  • Complaints about the assessment process being unfair are reduced
  • It is sophisticated, yet quick and easy to set up. It can be used in formative or summative assessment saving time and reducing workload
  • There is flexibility to create your own assessment criteria, scoring ranges and groups to suit the way you teach – in any subject discipline
  • It provides students with alternative forms of feedback within their assessment
  • The generation of individual student marks is automated using a pedagogically sound methodology
  • WebPA has been successfully used and evaluated for more than 10 years, giving confidence and access to a community of users

What are the challenges?

  • Specifying the criteria to mark against can take some time
  • Deciding what percentage of the overall mark should be peer-moderated
  • Some students still think that assessed groupwork disadvantages harder-working students by ‘dragging them down’

What are the potential uses?

  • Making the process of peer-moderated marking quicker and more efficient, both for the students and for the academic

Where can I found out more?

Go to the WebPA login page and click on ‘Take a tour’. There are academic and student versions of the tour.

Who can I talk to about this?

Any member of the e-learning team, in particular Lee Barnett.

Bristol Online Surveys (BOS)

What is it?

Bristol Online Surveys is an online survey creation tool. It enables you to create, run and analyse surveys without having any technical knowledge. 

What are the advantages?

  • BOS is free to use for any member of staff or student at Loughborough University.
  • BOS is available to use online and is fully functional. There is no limited or light version.
  • BOS is fully compatible with all browsers.
  • BOS supports multiple choice, multiple response, free text and sophisticated grid question types, as well as follow-on questions.
  • Your surveys can incorporate images, videos and links into surveys.
  • You can export your data into other software for analysis.
  • BOS enables you to preview, share and launch your survey URL for completion, as well as embed into other websites.

What are the challenges?

  • There is a learning curve to be able to use the tool; however, it’s very intuitive.
  • BOS workflow needs some understanding – it’s different from creating i.e. a word.doc
  • Time is required to produce questionnaires and help maybe required in questionnaire design and best practice.

Who can I talk to about this?

Talk to Sasha Dosanjh by email (s.s.dosanjh@lboro.ac.uk) for support on BOS or email IT.Services@lboro.ac.uk to request a BOS account.

 

 

 

Electronic Voting Systems (EVS)

What is it?

Electronic Voting Systems (EVS) enable you to encourage student interaction with the lecture content, which you can then use to guide learning direction, initiate formative assessment, get feedback on content, or just change the pace of learning.

The Electronic Voting System in use at Loughborough is called TurningPoint, and is a plugin for Microsoft PowerPoint.  This plugin allows you to build interactive questions as PowerPoint slides from within PowerPoint. In addition to the plugin (which is freely available from turningtechnologies.com) a wireless dongle and handsets are required.  The dongle is plugged in the PC or laptop from where you are running your TurningPoint PowerPoint questions slides from, and the handsets are given out to your students to allow them to vote.

What are the advantages?

  • An effective way of gaining engagement from your students
  • A way of introducing interactivity in large lectures
  • Ability to gain immediate responses and reporting of responses without delay
  • Students remain anonymous when ‘voting’ so are more willing to express their opinions, especially on contentious issues
  • Allows for demographic comparison of responses
  • Integrated into Powerpoint so feels familiar (for most people)
  • There is a Mac version
  • You can add questions on the fly during the lecture

What are the challenges?

  • Booking of handsets/dongle is required in advance via Teaching Support
  • With large groups, distributing handsets at the beginning of the lecture (and getting them back at the end!) can take time

What are the potential uses?

  • Quick diagnostic testing at the beginning of the semester
  • Check students’ understanding at the end of the lecture
  • Get students to discuss/vote in groups

Who can I talk to about this?

Lee Barnett and Matt Hope are the main contacts for advice on the software. Contact Teaching Support for hardware advice/availability.

IMPORTANT NOTE

If you’re intending to create a Turning Point presentation on your own laptop then take it on a memory stick to run on a podium PC, you can now install version 5 via the following steps:

  • On your PC click on Start/Control Panel
  • Click on 'Run Advertised Program (32 bit)'
  • Scroll down the list to 'Turning Technology TurningPoint 5 - install staff version' and click on 'Run'. If this is not listed, please send a request (with your computer name) to IT Services to have it added.

Version 5 is installed on all pool room podium PCs.

If you’re using a department-controlled room, check with your local technician.

Adobe Connect

What is it?

Adobe Connect is a web conferencing tool which allows users to

  • Speak to each other.
  • See each other.
  • Share presentations.
  • Share files with other users.
  • Allow remote control of presenter’s computer

Meetings are limited to 100 participants online at any one time.  External users can be given a meeting URL which gets them straight into the session, member of the university can gain access via a Learn activity.

Some of the most popular uses of this communications and teaching tool are for revision tutorials, sometimes held out of normal teaching hours and which students can access from home using their own PCs and broadband connections.

Using our portable equipment, any location with mains power and a wired network connection can host an online meeting.  The system has been successfully used to webcast a lecture presentation allowing remote participants to contribute to a conventional lecture situation.

Connect has three grades of user: the Host calls the meeting, invites the others and acts as the chair.  There must be at least one Host for every meeting.  A Presenter has most of the rights of the Host and can conduct the meeting. A Participant has fewest rights.  Meetings can be set up to automatically promote all Participants to Presenter status and this has successfully been used for groupwork amongst Distance Learning students.

What are the advantages?

  • Tutors can take a class without being on campus.
  • Reduction in travel for teaching or business meetings.
  • Records a teaching session.

What are the challenges?

  • The session needs to be set up as a module activity on Learn.
  • Presenters need a headset and (preferably) a webcam, but most of all they need a plan of what they want the session’s outcomes to be.

See Also:

Connect training videos      

Who can I talk to about this?

All members of the e-Learning Team are conversant with Connect, but Lee Barnett and Matt Hope are the primary contacts. ‌

GoogleDocs

What is it?

GoogleDocs is a suite of online tools, covered at Loughborough by a service level agreement between the University and Google, which allows staff and students to share and collaborate on documents of various kinds – word processor documents, spreadsheets and presentations. The terminology is confusing (even to the initiated!) because you will also hear and see reference to GoogleApps, GoogleSites, GoogleGroups, GoogleDrive, and Google+. In essence, GoogleDocs, Sites, Groups and Plus are all subsets of Apps, while Drive is officially the name for Google’s cloud-based storage solution (but seems to be what Docs is morphing into…)

If you can ignore these complexities, GoogleDocs does offer some powerful features that you can harness both in your teaching and in your research activities.

What are the advantages?

  • Covered by an agreement between the University and Google (unlike other external Web 2.0 services)
  • Easily share a document/spreadsheet/presentation with colleagues, students, or research collaborators in other institutions
  • Collaboratively edit these file types, with the ability to undo any changes
  • Google isn’t going to disappear overnight
  • The Google interface is already familiar to most people

What are the challenges?

  • It can be slow at times
  • Collaboratively editing a document is challenging full stop!
  • Google’s overall suite of tools is constantly evolving, and getting a grasp of which bit does what is not always straightforward

What are the potential uses?

  • Module groups can use GoogleDocs to work collaboratively on a groupwork report (instead of everyone sitting around a single laptop in the Library!)
  • Share project plans etc with research collaborators in other universities/countries
  • Consider using GoogleDocs for a teaching and learning activity where you might previously have used a wiki

How do I access it?

Log into http://docs.lboro.ac.uk using your Loughborough username and password.

Who can I talk to about this?

Contact your School E-learning Officer if you’d like to investigate how you could use the tools to support your research.

Digital OHPs (Visualisers)

What is it?

A Digital OHP or Visualiser is a presentation resource that directly connects to a PC or projector. It can pick up any kind of material placed under it be it photographs or objects. It is essentially a camera which sits over a flat surface on which you place an object whose image/video is projected on screen.

Over the summer of 2012, Digital OHPs (also known as ‘visualiser’) were installed in c.80% of pool teaching rooms on campus, replacing traditional OHPs.

 What are the advantages?

  • Not restricted to OHPs. You are able to project black and white paper, objects and much more besides
  • Available in almost all teaching rooms
  • Simple to use, no set up required
  • Portable version available from the E-Learning Office
  • Anything shown on the visualiser can also be captured by the ReVIEW lecture capture system

What are the disadvantages?

  • Display surface is restrictive in size

What are the potential uses?

  • Display of transparencies
  • Use as an alternative to a flipchart, eg to draw diagrams in realtime or to make notes of class discussions
  • Display objects (e.g. engineering components) on a large screen

 Who can I talk to about this?

 Teaching Support:

Learn

What is it? 

Learn is Loughborough’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), now based on the Moodle 2 system which is widely used across Further and Higher Education.

Learn is the online support ‘hub’ for every taught module, with each module listed on the LUSI student information system automatically having a module page on Learn.

Learn allows you to upload, or link to, resources of any kind – Word documents, Powerpoints, PDFs, spreadsheets, webpages, videos, etc. With the new version of Moodle/Learn it is possible to schedule the release of these resources to your students, so that (for instance) your Week 7 lecture notes are uploaded to the system but ‘greyed out’ until after the lecture.

Learn also has facilities for creating forums, wikis, glossaries, learning diaries, online assignments, and a range of other ‘interactive’ features. Support material on these aspects of Learn can be found in the Staff Hub module on Learn.

What are the advantages?

  • Consistent user interface and navigation for students across all their modules
  • The system has been very robust with little unplanned downtime since the introduction of Moodle
  • The editing screens for the various features such as forums, wikis, etc all work in a similar way
  • Most academic staff are now familiar with the way Moodle works

What are the challenges?

  • The new version of Moodle introduces a different approach to file upload/management which staff familiar with the previous version have found initially confusing
  • Staff are very busy and maintaining module pages on Learn takes time!
  • The system may be relatively straightforward but it’s still another IT system staff have to cope with

What are the potential uses?

  • It’s used (or should be) for every UG and PG module
  • It’s being used increasingly by support services, e.g. for staff development and communication

Who can I talk to about this?

Anyone in the E-learning Team, or if you have a specific technical query contact learn@lboro.ac.uk.

Learn Quiz

What is it?

Moodle Quiz is Learn’s inbuilt assessment engine and consists of two distinct parts:

  • Question banks
  • Quiz

For each module tutors can create banks of questions in a wide range of questions types (though not as many as QMP). These questions banks, although associated with an individual module, can be exported and shared with other tutors running different modules. The questions in these banks can also be used with other activities in a module like the ‘Lesson Activity’, not just with the ‘Quiz’ activity.

The quiz is basically a ‘container’ for the questions you have created in the question bank, but allows you to define how many questions from the bank are displayed, the duration of the test, when it is open to and from and all manner of other settings to control how the quiz operates.

What are the advantages?

  • Allows for sharing of questions
  • Marks recorded in the Moodle Gradebook
  • You control the whole process of administering a test from the creation of questions to the scheduling of tests
  • Usage logs easily available

What are the challenges?

  • Limited range of question types
  • Gives the look and feel of a ‘locked-down’ browser, but this can easily be evaded using keyboard shortcut keys
  • Tricky when needing to schedule different tests to different cohorts within the same module (for example, students with additional needs)

What are the potential uses?

  • Formative testing over the academic year to allow students to test themselves at their own pace
  • Diagnostic testing to allow the lecturer to see how students are performing and to highlight any problematic areas/topics

Who can I talk to about this?

All members of the e-Learning Team are conversant with Learn Quiz, but Lee Barnett and Matt Hope are the primary contact.

Optical Mark Recognition (OMR)

What is it?

Optical mark recognition (OMR) is a well-established means for automating the capture of paper-based data. OMR provides an opportunity to reduce workload for diagnostic, formative or summative assessment. Students fill in pre-printed forms, making a mark which an optical scanner will capture and interpret. OMR CAA (Computer Assisted Assessment) is particularly useful in assessing large student numbers.

What are the advantages?

  • Students don’t need a computer to sit test – just pencil and eraser
  • Whole process managed by CAA Support Officer – aims to reduce academic assessment workload
  • Flexible test layout – either single sheet or scannable test booklet
  • Flexible marking schemes, including subjective questions, weighting, number of responses, negative marking
  • Content is separate from layout – academics concentrate on content, the OMR Officer makes the content work with the OMR technology
  • Embedded into University Examination procedures
  • Extensive reporting capabilities, including detailed item analysis
  • Reduces lecturer administration

What are the challenges?

  • Feedback not immediate – can be a couple of hours or a couple of days, so not ideal for some formative tests
  • Some advanced question types unavailable
  • Whole process relies on CAA Support Officer

What are the potential uses?

  • End of year exams
  • Research/Course Surveys
  • Module feedback
  • Formative/summative/diagnostic testing

Who can I talk to about this?

Tim Baseley in IT Services is the primary contact.

Co-Tutor

What is it?

Co-Tutor is an online Staff and Student Relationship management system and is used by academic staff and administrators to communicate with and manage Personal Tutees, as well as project students, industrial placement activities, PG(R) supervision and course cohorts. The system is recognised by the University as an appropriate digital system to record these interactions, and retains the information in accordance with the Data Protection Act.

What are the advantages?

  • Provides one area for all Staff Student interactions to be recorded.
  • The system enables staff to record comments, meetings, and files related to individuals or for groups of students
  • Displays additional information relating to a student’s studies, such as attendance information, timetables, grades etc
  • Records are available throughout a student’s time at Loughborough and archived for the appropriate time after
  • If tutors change or leave, continuity of care can continue via reallocation of the tutees with no loss of records
  • Administration of allocating tutees is assisted via the export and import of CSV spreadsheets.
  • Copy co-tutorrecord@lboro.ac.uk to the cc field of your email, when sending the email to the student’s lboro email address, and automatically populate the student’s record
  • Communication can be made and/or recorded for individuals or groups of students as appropriate.

 What are the challenges?

  • There is a learning curve to be able to use the Co-Tutor. Training can be requested for individuals or groups via learn@lboro.ac.uk
  • Staff permissions and tutees allocations are assigned on a department basis. If you do not have the correct permissions or unable to view your tutees as expected contact your department Co-Tutor administrator, listed at https://co-tutor.lboro.ac.uk/support/deptcontacts/
  • Full benefits are obtained when all staff are engaged with recording information on Co-Tutor.

Who can I talk to about this?

Box of Broadcast (BoB)

What is it?

BoB (Box of Broadcasts) National is an innovative shared online off-air TV and radio recording service for UK higher and further education institutions.

BoB enables all staff and students in subscribing institutions to choose and record any broadcast programme from 60+ TV and radio channels. The recorded programmes are then kept indefinitely (no expiry) and added to a growing media archive (currently at over 1 million programmes), with all content shared by users across all subscribing institutions.

Think of it as an academic iPlayer or Sky Plus box, that allows you to flag up forthcoming programmes you’d like to ‘record’ and make available online to your students. You can also create clips and composite playlists if you want your students to focus on particular bits of programmes. The material you’ve recorded is then retained for others, including your own future cohorts, to access indefinitely (or as long as the institution continues to subscribe to the service).

What are the advantages?

  • BoB has a very simple intuitive interface, allowing you to quickly get to grips with its use
  • The licensing return to the ERA which manages off-air broadcasting in HE is automatically completed
  • You have access to an existing searchable media archive and can request any future 'free to air' TV or radio channel programme to be recorded
  • You have your own media 'play list' that never expires
  • Links to BoB recorded programmes can be embeded into modules on Learn, allowing students to easily access the resource directly from the module page.

What are the challenges?

  • Not all 'historic' broadcasts may be available.

 What are the potential uses?

  • To provide 'clips' to reinforce in class teaching.
  • To provide additional support materials (video and audio) both core and non-core.

How do I login to BoB? 

  • Go to the homepage of the BoB website at https://learningonscreen.ac.uk/ondemand/ 
  • Click on the 'Sign In' button.
  • In the "Where Are You From?" box, enter Loughborugh University and choose 'Loughborough University (ATHENS)' from the list that appears,then click the 'Go' button.
  • Use your Athens login details (available under the 'Staff Resources' drop-down menu on Learn) to sign in.

Who can I talk to about this?

Anyone in the E-learning Team.