Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 263171
Loughborough University

Peter Harrison Centre for Disability Sport

Team members

Ben Stone

PhD Student in Sport Performance

Ben is a PhD student at the PHC, under the supervision of Prof Vicky Tolfrey and Dr Barry Mason. 

Qualifications

  • BSc in Sports and Exercise Science, University of Bath (2014)

Current research interests

The title of Ben’s PhD is Hand-bike Set-up for Optimal Performance‏. His research interests lie in optimising sports performance primarily from a biomechanical and physiological perspective. This research will involve manipulating hand-bike set-up to optimise performance through the observation of biomechanical and physiological measures.

Previous research and experience

Whilst studying for his undergraduate at the University of Bath, Ben completed a 12 month placement in Adelaide at the South Australian Sports Institute. Ben worked as a biomechanist and performance analyst providing support for elite and developmental able bodied and disabled athletes from a variety of sports: the work was carried out in the field environment employing novel technologies for the purpose of athlete performance testing and progress monitoring.  These experiences sparked his interest in performance optimisation.

After graduating Ben spent a year with Hawkeye working with their electronic line calling system in tennis.  He spent the year travelling to tennis events around the world where he set-up and operated their ball tracking system.

Selected recent keynote and conference presentations

  • Stone, B.M. et al. (2014). Spinal muscle activity in simulated rugby union scrummaging is affected by different engagement conditions. 10th Bath Biomechanics Symposium, University of Bath, UK. 

Selected recent publications

  • Cazzola, D., Stone, B., Holsgrove, T.P., Trewartha, G. & Preatoni, E. (2015).Spinal muscle activity in simulated rugby union scrummaging is affected by different engagement techniques. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. doi: 10.1111/sms.12446