Loughborough University
Leicestershire, UK
LE11 3TU
+44 (0)1509 222222
Loughborough University

Centre for Research in Social Policy

Minimum Income Standard for People with Visual Impairment

Basket full of food

CRSP has been undertaking a series of research looking at the additional costs of sight loss.  It follows on from an initial project that started to fill a long-standing gap in the understanding of the true financial cost of disability for households.  The project used the Minimum Income Standard (MIS) to calculate the additional costs of living for single working age people who are sight impaired and for people who are profoundly deaf.  The findings showed that households in the two groups in this study would require budgets of respectively 25 per cent and 82 per cent higher than for someone without such an impairment.

Thomas Pocklington Trust commissioned CRSP to extend this work to look at further groups of people with sight loss to explore different dimensions - of level of impairment and of life stage.  These studies now provide a picture of how the additional needs and costs of a single visually impaired person vary depending on their age and severity of sight loss. Total additional costs per week (excluding housing costs) for a single person, compared to someone who is fully sighted, are as follows:

 

Sight impaired

Severely sight impaired

Working age

£50.33

£120.43

Pension age

£77.82

£135.61

 

Key findings of the study include:

Using MIS research as a baseline, the research comprised discussions among groups of visually impaired people about what a person in each of the circumstances above needs for a minimum acceptable standard of living.  In each case, they talk through all the things that someone needs in the home, and for life outside the home e.g. travel/social life - and look at what might be different because someone is visually impaired, and how much extra it might cost. 

A new phase of research is now underway to place these findings in context.  The new research project has two strands.  The first will use quantitative analysis to provide evidence around the sources of income of visually impaired people and how these compare to MIS budgets.  The second will, through in-depth interviews, look at the experiences of visually impaired people whose incomes fall under the MIS level, to explore how this affects their ability to meet their needs, and how people adapt and cope in their daily lives.

To be a possible participant in our latest research please read this Information Document.

 

Series Publications

Latest publications, January 2017

The full report:

Sight Loss and Minimum Income Standards: the additional costs of severity and age – PDF version

Sight Loss and Minimum Income Standards: the additional costs of severity and age – Word version

A summary of the findings:

Sight Loss and Minimum Income Standards: the additional costs of severity and age - Research Findings PDF version

Sight Loss and Minimum Income Standards: the additional costs of severity and age - Research Findings Word version

Second set of publications, January 2016

The full report:

Sight Loss and Minimum Living Standards - pdf

Sight Loss and Minimum Living Standards Report_Word

A summary of the findings

Sight Loss and Minimum Living Standards Research Findings - pdf

Sight Loss and Minimum Living Standards Research Findings_Word


Original Publications, January 2015


The results are presented in:

A full report presenting the method and the results in full

Disability and Minimum Living Standards Report

Disability and Minimum Living Standards Report - Word

A summary of findings of the project as a whole

Findings - For people who are sight impaired and for people who are Deaf

Findings - For people who are sight impaired and people who are Deaf - Word

Separate summaries covering sight impaired and Deaf findings

Findings - Additional costs of living for people who are sight impaired

Findings - Additional costs of living for people who are sight impaired - Word

Findings - Additional costs of living for people who are Deaf

Findings - Additional costs of living for people who are Deaf - Word

A signed version of the Deaf findings, presented in British Sign Language, can be found by clicking here

 

Centre for Research
in Social Policy

Department of Social Sciences
Loughborough University
Leicestershire
LE11 3TU

+44 (0)1509 223372

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