News and events

News

A man checks his fitness tracker in the gym

It’s not your fitness tracker that is wrong – it’s you

An international study has revealed that people, regardless of where they live and their age, poorly guess how physically active they actually are.

The study, led by the University of Southern California (USC), used fitness trackers to investigate how physically active people consider themselves to be, versus how physically active they really are.

The research, which was co-authored by Loughborough University’s Professor Mark Hamer and a team of international researchers, has revealed that no one gets it right.

The American responses suggest they are as active as the Dutch or the English. Older people think they are as active as young people. In reality, though, Americans are much less active than the Europeans and older people are less active than the young.

“It means people in different countries or at different age groups can have vastly different interpretations of the same survey questions,” says Arie Kapteyn, the study’s lead author and executive director of the Center for Economic and Social Research at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Kapteyn believes the differences in fitness perceptions are driven by cultural and environmental differences.

For instance, Americans are largely dependent on cars while the Dutch frequently walk or ride bicycles to work and for simple errands, Kapteyn says.

For the study, the scientists tracked 540 participants from the United States, 748 people from the Netherlands and 254 from England.

Men and women in the study, ages 18 and up, were asked in a survey to report their physical activity on a five-point scale, ranging from inactive to very active. They also wore a fitness-tracking device on their wrist (an accelerometer) so that scientists could measure their actual physical activity over a seven-day period.

The researchers found that the Dutch and English were slightly more likely to rate themselves toward the “moderate” center of the scale, while Americans tended to rate themselves at the extreme ends of the scale, either as “very active” or “inactive.” But overall, the differences in how people from all three countries self-reported their physical activity was modest or non-existent.

The wearable devices revealed hard truths: Americans were much less physically active than both the Dutch and English. In fact, the percentage of Americans in the inactive category was nearly twice as large as the percentage of Dutch participants.

A comparison of fitness tracker data by age group reveals that people in all three countries are generally less active as they get older. That said, inactivity appeared more widespread among older Americans than participants in the other countries: 60 percent of Americans were inactive, compared to 42 percent of the Dutch and 32 percent of the English.

The researchers found that, in all three countries, the disparities between perceived and real activity levels were greatest among participants who reported that they were either “very active” or “very inactive.”

“Individuals in different age groups simply have different standards of what it means to be physically active,” said Kapteyn. “They adjust their standards based on their circumstances, including their age.”

Kapteyn says that since physical activity is so central to a healthy life, accurate measurements are important to science. The findings indicate that scientists should proceed with caution when interpreting and comparing the results of international fitness studies that have utilized standardized questionnaires.

“When you rely on self-reported data, you’re not only relying on people to share a common understanding of survey terms, but to accurately remember the physical activity that they report,” says Kapteyn. “With the wide availability of low-cost activity tracking devices, we have the potential to make future studies more reliable.”

Professor Mark Hamer, from Loughborough’s School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences, added: “We suspected for a long time that self-reported physical activity is a poor measure. The majority of our current physical activity evidence is, however, based on self-reported information that has implications for providing accurate advice about healthy levels of activity for disease prevention.”

The study has been published today (April 11) in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.

The project was led by the University of Southern California, in partnership with Loughborough University, the University of Manchester, RAND Corp., University College London, Tilburg University, and Maastricht University.

Notes for editors

Press release reference number: PR 18/56

Loughborough University is equipped with a live in-house broadcast unit via the Globelynx network. To arrange an interview with one of our experts please contact the press office on 01509 223491. Bookings can be made online via www.globelynx.com.

Loughborough is one of the country’s leading universities, with an international reputation for research that matters, excellence in teaching, strong links with industry, and unrivalled achievement in sport and its underpinning academic disciplines.

It has been awarded five stars in the independent QS Stars university rating scheme, named the best university in the world to study sports-related subjects in the 2018 QS World University Rankings and top in the country for its student experience in the 2018 THE Student Experience Survey.

Loughborough is in the top 10 of every national league table, being ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Table 2018, 7th in the Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018 and 10th in The UK Complete University Guide 2018. It was also named Sports University of the Year by The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017.

Loughborough is consistently ranked in the top twenty of UK universities in the Times Higher Education’s ‘table of tables’ and is in the top 10 in England for research intensity. In recognition of its contribution to the sector, Loughborough has been awarded seven Queen's Anniversary Prizes.

The Loughborough University London campus is based on the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and offers postgraduate and executive-level education, as well as research and enterprise opportunities. It is home to influential thought leaders, pioneering researchers and creative innovators who provide students with the highest quality of teaching and the very latest in modern thinking.

Categories