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Exploring the macabre, championing the overlooked and exploding literary crrriticism
Exploring the macabre, championing the overlooked and exploding literary crrriticism Oliver Tearle at the launch of the Montblanc Daniel Defoe pen – September 2014.
Exploring the macabre, championing the overlooked and exploding literary crrriticism
Exploring the macabre, championing the overlooked and exploding literary crrriticism

Research rising star - Oliver Tearle

  • Exploring the macabre, championing the overlooked and exploding literary crrriticism

Having completed his undergraduate studies at Loughborough, Oliver stayed on to pursue his PhD, and was appointed as a Lecturer in 2013.

His thesis – an experimental work of criticism exploring why readers are prone to hallucinations while reading about the experience of hallucination – formed the basis of his first book Bewilderments of Vision: Hallucination and Literature, 1880-1914, published in 2012.

His second book – T.E. Hulme and Modernism (2013) – uniquely champions the influence on Modernism of the oft-overlooked writer and argues that his work provides new ways of thinking about 21st century writing – effectively re-evaluating literary criticism and writing itself.

Another more famous Modernist writer is the subject of his third in-progress work which considers

T. S. Eliot and the idea of citizenship during the first half of the 20th century.

He has also published articles on a range of topics – spanning T. S. Eliot, Oscar Wilde, dystopian fiction, and Edwardian paranormal detective stories – in numerous publications and journals including Notes and Queries, Critical Sense and the Modern Language Review.

As co-editor of Crrritic! (2011), Oliver worked with Professor John Schad (Lancaster University) to contribute to and publish a collection of writing by exponents of the emerging field of literary critical-creative writing.

In March 2013, he was invited to speak at Lancaster University on critical-creative writing as part of Language-Witness-Criticism: A Videoconference Symposium with Geoffrey Hartman, a collaboration with Yale University.

In September of the same year, he was invited to speak at the international T. E. Hulme Colloquium, at the University of Oxford.

Although his research tends to draw him back in time, he embraces 21st-century modes of communication to reach a wide and growing audience.

He writes a literature blog for the Huffington Post, and his online platform Interesting Literature: A Library of Literary Interestingness regularly engages over 10,000 readers every week. The site has wide appeal – its accompanying Twitter feed @InterestingLit has over 90,000 followers – and has hosted guest bloggers including author Warren Adler and Shakespeare scholar Stanley Wells CBE.