Working with business

Case studies

State-of-the-art optical diagnostic facilities and advanced computational modelling will revolutionise HDV efficiencies
State-of-the-art optical diagnostic facilities and advanced computational modelling will revolutionise HDV efficiencies

Improving HDV exhaust system efficiencies

  • A Loughborough-based lab will play a key role in developing word-leading NOx reduction technologies

Hosted by the Midlands Energy Consortium and a key tenant of LUSEP, the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) supports collaborative engineering projects that accelerate the development of affordable, secure and sustainable energy technologies including emissions reduction.

In December 2013, ETI launched a high-tech laboratory at the University as part of a £4.5m project to explore ways of improving the catalytic conversion efficiencies of exhaust systems in heavy duty vehicles (HDVs).

Led by clean technologies company Johnson Matthey, the collaborative project brings together the University’s expertise – particularly a team from the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering led by Professor Graham Hargrave – and ETI member, Caterpillar.

Using a range of state-of-the-art optical diagnostic facilities and advanced computational modelling, the laboratory is equipped to measure the fluid and gas flows within modern HDV exhaust systems.

The research will play a key role in developing word-leading NOx reduction technologies – specifically a more efficient HDV catalytic converter which should deliver fuel efficiency and CO2 benefits of between 3–4%.

Key milestones

  • Launch 

    The collaborative project was launched in November 2012.

  • Partners 

    Consortium partners include Loughborough University, Johnson Matthey and Caterpillar.

  • Loughborough's key role 

    Nicky Morgan MP visited the laboratory at its official launch in December 2013, noting: “I am pleased to see that two of the key organisations behind the project are from Loughborough.”