School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences

PhD opportunities

Jordan Dawson

Photo of  Jordan Dawson

Jordan graduated from Brunel University in 2012 with a BSc in Sport and Exercise Science. He went on to study for an MSc Globalization and Sport at Loughborough University writing his dissertation on the migration of British female footballers. He is currently a third year postgraduate researcher jointly supervised by the Geography Department and the School of Sport, Exercise and Health Sciences.

Jordan is the current PGR Programme President responsible for representing the PGR community at various university committees and events. He has also been part of the team who created the Loughborough University PhD Peer Support Network, a PhD led group who offer support and signposting in an informal setting (www.lboro.ac.uk/services/graduateschool/resources/phdsupportnetwork/). Within this Jordan has won several awards, both personally and as part of the PhD Support Network team. This has included ‘Most Innovative Peer Mentor’ and a £1000 development fund at the recent Graduate School Summer Showcase.

Project information

The impacts of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in East London on the practices and perceptions of park visitors and local youth

Jordan’s project explores the role of the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park on visitors and local youth perceptions and practices post London 2012. Three phases contribute to this study. Firstly, a longitudinal questionnaire survey of Olympic Park visitors, followed by a postal survey of school senior management and physical education staff, and finally a participatory focus group of KS4 students from the four boroughs of Hackney, Newham, Tower Hamlets and Waltham Forest.

As part of this research project, Jordan employs an actor-network theory (ANT) approach to understanding ‘legacy’. This has led to the development of a novel conceptual framework drawing on the body of legacy theory within sport sociology and an understanding of ANT led by Jöns development of dynamic hybrids. This has led to a PhD thesis which considers mega-event legacy as multi-faceted and comprehensive. This work has been presented at PSA Sport and Politics Group Conference (2015) and internally within the Geography department and is currently being written for journal publication.

Jordan has presented at several conferences, both internally and externally, since beginning his research. His poster presentation at the School of Sport, Exercise, and Health Sciences conference was awarded one of two first place prizes of £100.