Mechanical, Electrical and Manufacturing Engineering

Research

Design Engineering Research Group

Research focusses on models, methodologies, strategies and policies to support design in the current and future contexts, where issues related to people, product and process are inter-related.

The group consists of a number of academic staff with core skills and interests in design as it relates to the people, product and process. The goal is to develop methodologies, enabling technologies and strategies and policies to enable efficient, effective and optimised solutions through design. The research covers a broad spectrum of industry applications.

Keith Case

Keith is Professor of Computer Aided Engineering. He has a BSc in Production Engineering and Production Management, University of Nottingham 1971 and a PhD in Human Modelling, University of Nottingham, 1975. His research interests include CAD, ergonomics and human modelling. He is recognised originator of the GRASP (robot simulation) and SAMMIE (human simulation) systems which are exploited worldwide by BYG Systems and SAMMIE CAD respectively.

Yee Mey Goh

Mey has a BEng (Hons) in Mechanical Engineering from Universiti Tenaga Nasional, Malaysia and a PhD from University of Bristol, UK. She has worked with the aerospace, defence, energy and automotive sectors addressing challenges associated with delivering complex, high-value manufacturing and through-life engineering systems. She is a Member of the Design Society and a committee member of the Consortium of the UK University Manufacturing and Engineering (COMEH) and the IEOM Women in Industry and Academia.

Her interdisciplinary research interests lie in the interface of human and technical systems, specifically in:

Through-life knowledge management for product service systems.
Human skills extraction, wearable and virtual reality technologies for intelligent automation.
Uncertainty analysis and modelling to support decision-making.

Ella-Mae Hubbard

Ella completed her MEng in Systems Engineering, followed by Ph.D. in Human Sciences (Ergonomics), both at Loughborough University. Ella’s research interests involve understanding the impact of technology insertion on relevant process and organisational design, along with other human factors considerations. She is also interested in the design of training and support programmes for various groups.

Ella is involved in a number of projects:

Health and prognostic assessment of railway assets for predictive maintenance
Optimised selection of aircrew training media for future operations
The development of a culture based tool to predict team performance
Supporting multidisciplinary group projects

Laura Justham

Laura graduated from Loughborough University in 2003 with a Masters of Physics degree and Diploma of Industrial Studies. She completed her PhD at Loughborough University, graduating in 2007. Following a number of Postdoctoral research positions she was appointed as a lecturer in the Wolfson School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering in March 2012.

She is currently an academic member of the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Intelligent Automation at Loughborough and the lead academic for a number of the automation projects within the Centre. She has a particular interest in automation through robotics, methods of adopting better human-machine co-operation, advanced machine vision systems and the Centre’s outreach programme.

Ian Graham

Ian has a BEng Product Design and PhD Evolutionary Design, both from Loughborough University. He has previous Engineer-Designer-Manager roles in automotive (Toyota), portable electronics (GE), and architecture. Ian joined LU in 2006 as a Research Associate in the School of Civil and Building Engineering, moved to the Design School in 2007 as a Senior Research Associate then Enterprise Fellow, then to the Wolfson School in 2012.

Coining the term ‘Interactive Optimisation’ to describe his specialism within the field of Humanised Computational Intelligence, he applies this approach to generative computer aided design, additive manufacturing for heritage restoration, and decision making within remanufacturing service systems.

Generative Design, Interactive Evolutionary Design and Optimisation
Remanufacturing (including Circular Economy & Product Service Systems)
Additive Manufacturing and other digital technologies for cultural preservation

James Colwill

James obtained a BSc in Innovation and Design Management from the Open University whilst working full-time at the London Stock Exchange. He then spent a further 20 years in industry, primarily as a design and innovation consultant, working on global brands across a wide range of manufacturing sectors from food and drink, to pharmaceutical, cosmetics, electronics and fast moving consumer goods. James also has first-hand enterprise experience having established three successful companies with a combined annual turnover of £4.5 million, the latest based in the university innovation centre and focusing on material and technology innovations within 3D Printing.

In addition to his industrial experience and expertise, James has a PhD in the biopolymers and their selection / application for greater sustainability. In April 2012, James was appointed as a lecturer in Sustainable Design and Manufacturing at Loughborough University and is currently PI on the Resource Efficient Manufacturing grand challenge within the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing (CIM) in Industrial Sustainability and Co-I on another EPSRC CIM on Food.

His research interests include:

Sustainable Product and Process Design
Repurposing and Remanufacturing
Renewable Resources: Application, Management and Strategy
Resource Efficiency and Additive Manufacturing
Recycling Technologies and Processes
Product and Process Life Cycle Assessment

Carmen Torres-Sanchez

Carmen’s interest in the manufacture of porous materials whose internal architecture can be tailored to meet specific requirements (i.e. structural and biomimetic materials) has driven the development of a novel technique in the adjustment of cellular geometry of solid polymeric foams via controlled ultrasonic irradiation.

Other research interests include:

  • Added functionality in materials and structures
  • Acoustic applications for the manipulation and manufacture of materials
  • Materials and lightweight structures
  • Medical and Orthopaedic applications and devices
  • Bioengineering and scaffolds for Medical applications
  • Embedded intelligence in products, systems and environments
  • Architecture and design; intelligent buildings
  • Elimination and control of hazardous substances
  • Packaging and sacrificial structures
  • Use of renewable, biodegradable materials
  • Biologically inspired decision-making, optimisation strategies

Leila Sheldrick (Visiting academic, Imperial College)

Leila is a Lecturer in Design Engineering with expertise in Industrial Design based at the Dyson School of Design Engineering at Imperial College London, and a visiting academic here in the Wolfson School at Loughborough University.

Originally a graduate of the Wolfson, Leila holds a PhD in Sustainable Product Design Processes and an MEng in Product Design and Manufacture from Loughborough University and has studied Industrial Design and Design Thinking as a postgraduate at the Umeå Institute of Design in Sweden. Leila spent a number of years working in product design and development in various sectors including a long stint at Triumph Motorcycles and some time with Engineers without Borders, before returning to Loughborough to complete her PhD. Her research interests focus on realising more sustainable design processes, envisaging future systems of consumption and production, utilising ubiquitous computing and interactive technologies in design, and exploring the relationship between product and process design.